Power light blinking (amber color)

Discussion in 'Dell' started by drw4e, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. drw4e

    drw4e Guest

    I shut down my Dell Dimension 8300 on Friday when I went away for th
    weekend and tried to turn it back on last night only to find out tha
    the power light blinks. Nothing turns on, no fan, no hard drive, jus
    complete silence. When I unplug the tower, there's a single click.
    get the same click when I plug it back in and the light continues t
    blink even without pushing the button.

    I checked the manual and it said to make sure the processor cable wa
    plugged into the motherboard, which it is. Not sure what else to do
    Any ideas? The computer's only 1.5 years old, so I'm kind of ticked
     
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  2. Ted Zieglar

    Ted Zieglar Guest

    I'm going to take an educated guess and say that you had what the power
    protection companies call a "power event". In your case, it was a power
    surge that burned your power supply and/or motherboard. The 'click' is an
    electric spark. I think you should have your computer examined by a
    technician. I also think it's time to consider a UPS, or to reconsider the
    one you have now.

    --
    Ted Zieglar
    "You can do it if you try."

    "drw4e" <> wrote in message
    news:lt7Gf.63625$...
    > I shut down my Dell Dimension 8300 on Friday when I went away for the
    > weekend and tried to turn it back on last night only to find out that
    > the power light blinks. Nothing turns on, no fan, no hard drive, just
    > complete silence. When I unplug the tower, there's a single click. I
    > get the same click when I plug it back in and the light continues to
    > blink even without pushing the button.
    >
    > I checked the manual and it said to make sure the processor cable was
    > plugged into the motherboard, which it is. Not sure what else to do.
    > Any ideas? The computer's only 1.5 years old, so I'm kind of ticked.
    >
     
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  3. S.Lewis

    S.Lewis Guest

    "Ted Zieglar" <> wrote in message
    news:dsb68j$d7j$...
    > I'm going to take an educated guess and say that you had what the power
    > protection companies call a "power event". In your case, it was a power
    > surge that burned your power supply and/or motherboard. The 'click' is an
    > electric spark. I think you should have your computer examined by a
    > technician. I also think it's time to consider a UPS, or to reconsider the
    > one you have now.
    >
    > --
    > Ted Zieglar
    > "You can do it if you try."
    >



    Ditto to Ted's remarks, if you DO have a UPS/surge, trying plugging the
    system directly to the wall just to verify the UPS itself. If it's already
    plugged to the wall, you're going to need to get your hands dirty or hire
    someone to do it for you and find out specifically what has gacked.


    Stew
     
  4. w_tom

    w_tom Guest

    More likely you have a manufacturing defect. Those who are quick to
    promote popular myths will blame destructive transients. Those
    transient occur typically once every eight years.

    Decide whether you will analyze it - or have a professional. Many
    first analysis steps are simple. Start with the foundation upon which
    the computer is constructed - power supply 'system'. Note, I did not
    say just 'power supply'. For this, a ubiquitous tools called a 3.5
    digit multimeter is required. A tool so common as to be sold in Home
    Depot, Lowes, Sears, and Radio Shack. In your case, the first voltage
    measurement starts with the purple wire from power supply to
    motherboard. Then the green and gray wire voltages must be recorded.
    Purple wire must measure more than 4.87 when power cord is connected -
    computer powered on or off. And what that actual number is should be
    reported because the value includes other useful information.

    The overall summary of what you are looking at - how those wire
    voltages change when power switch is pressed, etc - is found in
    previous posts:
    "Computer doesnt start at all" in alt.comp.hardware on 10 Jan 2004
    at
    http://tinyurl.com/2t69q and
    "I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5 Feb 2004
    at
    http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa

    Do not waste time and money replacing this and that. First learn
    what really is wrong. Remember it's a power supply 'system'. Numbers
    that you don't understand should be posted for further insight.
    However if you are not going to start with the multimeter, then get a
    professional to fix it. Numbers from that meter are important to fix
    it right first time.

    drw4e wrote:
    > I shut down my Dell Dimension 8300 on Friday when I went away for the
    > weekend and tried to turn it back on last night only to find out that
    > the power light blinks. Nothing turns on, no fan, no hard drive, just
    > complete silence. When I unplug the tower, there's a single click. I
    > get the same click when I plug it back in and the light continues to
    > blink even without pushing the button.
    >
    > I checked the manual and it said to make sure the processor cable was
    > plugged into the motherboard, which it is. Not sure what else to do.
    > Any ideas? The computer's only 1.5 years old, so I'm kind of ticked.
     
  5. Fixer

    Fixer Guest

    Aflashing amber light requires a new Power supply problem and or motherboard
    its a known problem with Dell so if its under warranty just make the call if
    not then look on ebay for parts
    "S.Lewis" <> wrote in message
    news:1MbGf.211$...
    >
    > "Ted Zieglar" <> wrote in message
    > news:dsb68j$d7j$...
    >> I'm going to take an educated guess and say that you had what the power
    >> protection companies call a "power event". In your case, it was a power
    >> surge that burned your power supply and/or motherboard. The 'click' is an
    >> electric spark. I think you should have your computer examined by a
    >> technician. I also think it's time to consider a UPS, or to reconsider
    >> the
    >> one you have now.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ted Zieglar
    >> "You can do it if you try."
    >>

    >
    >
    > Ditto to Ted's remarks, if you DO have a UPS/surge, trying plugging the
    > system directly to the wall just to verify the UPS itself. If it's already
    > plugged to the wall, you're going to need to get your hands dirty or hire
    > someone to do it for you and find out specifically what has gacked.
    >
    >
    > Stew
    >
     
  6. drw4e

    drw4e Guest

    Thanks for the help so far.

    Anybody know if Dell uses a standard motherboard connection from the
    power supply or is it proprietary?
     
  7. Pen

    Pen Guest

    "drw4e" <> wrote in message
    news:azsGf.79709$...
    > Thanks for the help so far.
    >
    > Anybody know if Dell uses a standard motherboard connection from the
    > power supply or is it proprietary?
    >

    The 8300 is standard ATX.
     
  8. PC Medic

    PC Medic Guest

    "drw4e" <> wrote in message
    news:lt7Gf.63625$...
    >I shut down my Dell Dimension 8300 on Friday when I went away for the
    > weekend and tried to turn it back on last night only to find out that
    > the power light blinks. Nothing turns on, no fan, no hard drive, just
    > complete silence. When I unplug the tower, there's a single click. I
    > get the same click when I plug it back in and the light continues to
    > blink even without pushing the button.
    >
    > I checked the manual and it said to make sure the processor cable was
    > plugged into the motherboard, which it is. Not sure what else to do.
    > Any ideas? The computer's only 1.5 years old, so I'm kind of ticked.
    >


    This is the symptom that usually accompanies a failed power supply.
    If you have access to another (PS) you could try as they are standard in the
    8300, it would confirm this.
     
  9. drw4e

    drw4e Guest

    Just a quick update, the computer is actually an 8400. I tried tw
    other power supplies and they did no match up with the mother board.
    The connectors on the other power supplies had 20 pins while the Del
    connector has 24 pins. I'm guessing it's proprietary to Dell. I'l
    check Dell or ebay to see what I can find unless you guys have othe
    suggestions
     
  10. w_tom

    w_tom Guest

    Be very careful when wildly replacing things. Some may appear to be
    identical - only to create more damage later. Just another reason to
    first take those two minutes to collect simple measurement rather than
    'hope' a shotgun approach does not cause more damage. Some connectors
    with same number of pins may put one voltage on the wrong pin. Color
    and pin numbers for standard ATX supplies must match.

    That simple measurement procedure would help confirm whether a new
    supply is compatible as well as save time. How long did it take to
    swap a power supply? Collecting numbers with a multimeter should take
    about two minutes.

    Pictures of standard connectors that may also help - to avoid more
    damage:
    http://techrepublic.com.com/5102-10586-5566528.html
    www.ochardware.com/articles/psuvolt/psuvolt.html

    drw4e wrote:
    > Just a quick update, the computer is actually an 8400. I tried two
    > other power supplies and they did no match up with the mother board.
    > The connectors on the other power supplies had 20 pins while the Dell
    > connector has 24 pins. I'm guessing it's proprietary to Dell. I'll
    > check Dell or ebay to see what I can find unless you guys have other
    > suggestions.
     
  11. S.Lewis

    S.Lewis Guest

    "drw4e" <> wrote in message
    news:Cm2Hf.120574$...
    > Just a quick update, the computer is actually an 8400. I tried two
    > other power supplies and they did no match up with the mother board.
    > The connectors on the other power supplies had 20 pins while the Dell
    > connector has 24 pins. I'm guessing it's proprietary to Dell. I'll
    > check Dell or ebay to see what I can find unless you guys have other
    > suggestions.
    >



    The Dim8400 has a (24-pin) BTX power supply. These are now becoming
    industry standard. The Dim8300 had a standard (20-pins) P1 connect.....



    Stew
     
  12. Ben Myers

    Ben Myers Guest

    Standard ATX-12v, actually. I forget whether the power supply cutout on the
    back of the Dimension 8300 case is large enough to handle the external switch
    found on many aftermarket power supplies. It is something to be aware of.

    .... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 20:32:06 GMT, lid (drw4e) wrote:

    >Thanks for the help so far.
    >
    >Anybody know if Dell uses a standard motherboard connection from the
    >power supply or is it proprietary?
     
  13. Steve Urbach

    Steve Urbach Guest

    My P300 had a bad video card that caused the Amber blinking power led.
    BAD hardware somewhere. Strip the system down to as little as possible
    and see what shows.

    On 8 Feb 2006 07:14:28 -0800, "w_tom" <> wrote:

    > More likely you have a manufacturing defect. Those who are quick to
    >promote popular myths will blame destructive transients. Those
    >transient occur typically once every eight years.
    >
    > Decide whether you will analyze it - or have a professional. Many
    >first analysis steps are simple. Start with the foundation upon which
    >the computer is constructed - power supply 'system'. Note, I did not
    >say just 'power supply'. For this, a ubiquitous tools called a 3.5
    >digit multimeter is required. A tool so common as to be sold in Home
    >Depot, Lowes, Sears, and Radio Shack. In your case, the first voltage
    >measurement starts with the purple wire from power supply to
    >motherboard. Then the green and gray wire voltages must be recorded.
    >Purple wire must measure more than 4.87 when power cord is connected -
    >computer powered on or off. And what that actual number is should be
    >reported because the value includes other useful information.
    >
    > The overall summary of what you are looking at - how those wire
    >voltages change when power switch is pressed, etc - is found in
    >previous posts:
    >"Computer doesnt start at all" in alt.comp.hardware on 10 Jan 2004
    >at
    > http://tinyurl.com/2t69q and
    >"I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5 Feb 2004
    >at
    > http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa
    >
    > Do not waste time and money replacing this and that. First learn
    >what really is wrong. Remember it's a power supply 'system'. Numbers
    >that you don't understand should be posted for further insight.
    >However if you are not going to start with the multimeter, then get a
    >professional to fix it. Numbers from that meter are important to fix
    >it right first time.
    >
    >drw4e wrote:
    >> I shut down my Dell Dimension 8300 on Friday when I went away for the
    >> weekend and tried to turn it back on last night only to find out that
    >> the power light blinks. Nothing turns on, no fan, no hard drive, just
    >> complete silence. When I unplug the tower, there's a single click. I
    >> get the same click when I plug it back in and the light continues to
    >> blink even without pushing the button.
    >>
    >> I checked the manual and it said to make sure the processor cable was
    >> plugged into the motherboard, which it is. Not sure what else to do.
    >> Any ideas? The computer's only 1.5 years old, so I'm kind of ticked.
     
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