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Re: Any ideas why my new RAM won't work?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Mike Walsh, Sep 7, 2008.

  1. Mike Walsh

    Mike Walsh Guest

    David wrote:
    >
    > On Sat, 06 Sep 2008 10:06:13 -0600, Ken <> wrote:
    >
    > >You should download the complete manual on your MB if you have not
    > >already done so. Some MBs will not accept what is called high density
    > >RAM. That is determined most often by how many ICs are on each stick.
    > >This could be your problem. Get all the info possible before coming to
    > >any conclusions.

    >
    > Thanks to all those who responded. Taking it back to the shop is a
    > last alternative, as I didn't buy them in my own town, and it's a bit
    > tricky getting back. But that's by the by. This concept of high and
    > low density is completely new to me, and I thought I'd make this my
    > first avenue of investigation.
    >
    > I found from the internet the LOW is 64x8 and HIGH is 128x8. I don't
    > understand how these figures related to 256, but ignoring that for the
    > moment, it rung a bell. I HAVE seen (eg) 64x8 mentioned on an (old)
    > ram stick before, in amongst all the various serial nos. on the
    > sticker (sometimes several stickers!)
    >
    > Unfortunately there is no such indication on these new sticks. I've
    > also spent a good half an hour browsing the net with the serial
    > number, and yes, I found dozens and dozens of references (usually from
    > shops!) but whilst they all said SDRAM, PC133 etc., not one single
    > person mentioned if it was a high or low density item.
    >
    > I'm feeling right now that they must be high, and that my motherboard
    > does not cater for them (will start my search for a manual to confirm
    > that shortly) but all the same, I'd love to know if there is any other
    > way I can tell high from low? (In case I ever buy ram in the future,
    > new or used, and it doesn't say which).


    High density and low density are relative terms. A chip that was considered high density a few years ago is now considered low density. A rule of thumb is a DIMM with 8 chips is considered low density (relative to the motherboard) and a DIMM with 4 or 2 chips is high density.

    --
    Mike Walsh
     
    Mike Walsh, Sep 7, 2008
    #1
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  2. Mike Walsh

    jaster Guest

    On Sun, 07 Sep 2008 12:27:01 -0400, Mike Walsh thoughfully wrote:

    > David wrote:
    >>
    >> On Sat, 06 Sep 2008 10:06:13 -0600, Ken <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >You should download the complete manual on your MB if you have not
    >> >already done so. Some MBs will not accept what is called high density
    >> >RAM. That is determined most often by how many ICs are on each stick.
    >> >This could be your problem. Get all the info possible before coming
    >> >to any conclusions.

    >>
    >> Thanks to all those who responded. Taking it back to the shop is a last
    >> alternative, as I didn't buy them in my own town, and it's a bit tricky
    >> getting back. But that's by the by. This concept of high and low
    >> density is completely new to me, and I thought I'd make this my first
    >> avenue of investigation.
    >>
    >> I found from the internet the LOW is 64x8 and HIGH is 128x8. I don't
    >> understand how these figures related to 256, but ignoring that for the
    >> moment, it rung a bell. I HAVE seen (eg) 64x8 mentioned on an (old) ram
    >> stick before, in amongst all the various serial nos. on the sticker
    >> (sometimes several stickers!)
    >>
    >> Unfortunately there is no such indication on these new sticks. I've
    >> also spent a good half an hour browsing the net with the serial number,
    >> and yes, I found dozens and dozens of references (usually from shops!)
    >> but whilst they all said SDRAM, PC133 etc., not one single person
    >> mentioned if it was a high or low density item.
    >>
    >> I'm feeling right now that they must be high, and that my motherboard
    >> does not cater for them (will start my search for a manual to confirm
    >> that shortly) but all the same, I'd love to know if there is any other
    >> way I can tell high from low? (In case I ever buy ram in the future,
    >> new or used, and it doesn't say which).

    >
    > High density and low density are relative terms. A chip that was
    > considered high density a few years ago is now considered low density. A
    > rule of thumb is a DIMM with 8 chips is considered low density (relative
    > to the motherboard) and a DIMM with 4 or 2 chips is high density.


    Number of chips does not indicate density.
     
    jaster, Sep 7, 2008
    #2
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