Re: need RAM recommendation - please help

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Adam, Jul 1, 2012.

  1. Adam

    Adam Guest

    "glee" <> wrote in message
    news:jsok8q$n35$...
    > "Paul" <> wrote in message
    > news:jsnbfg$83k$...
    >> Adam wrote:
    >>> Need RAM recommendation for the following motherboard ...
    >>>
    >>> - ASUS M5A99X Evo - AM3+ - 990X - SATA 6Gbps and USB 3.0 - ATX DDR3 2133
    >>> Motherboards
    >>>
    >>> I am thinking about the following ...
    >>>
    >>> - Crucial Ballistix 240-Pin DDR3
    >>>
    >>> but need help with the specific model and amount (at least 8 GB due to
    >>> VirtualBox/VM usage).
    >>>

    >>
    >> Check the customer reviews on Newegg, for each product you are
    >> interested in.
    >>
    >> Some RAM has a high enough failure rate, you should stay away
    >> from it.
    >>
    >> The customer reviews, tells you what to avoid.

    >
    > Well I wouldn't go solely by some customer reviews. RAM by all the major
    > suppliers (Crucial, Corsair, etc) is all good. Better to use RAM from the
    > approved list suggested by the board maker Asus.
    > --
    > Glen Ventura
    > MS MVP Oct. 2002 - Sept. 2009
    > CompTIA A+



    Thanks, the customer reviews led me to the following ...

    G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3
    12800) Desktop Memory Model
    F3-12800CL9Q-16GBRL [$95]
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231315

    G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3
    12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9Q-16GBXL [$95]
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231429

    But, they are not listed in the approved list suggested by the board maker
    Asus.
    Are these models okay or not?

    What is the difference between the two models above?
    And, how is G.SKILL vs Crucial vs Corsair?
     
    Adam, Jul 1, 2012
    #1
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  2. Adam

    Paul Guest

    Adam wrote:
    > "glee" <> wrote in message
    > news:jsok8q$n35$...
    >> "Paul" <> wrote in message
    >> news:jsnbfg$83k$...
    >>> Adam wrote:
    >>>> Need RAM recommendation for the following motherboard ...
    >>>>
    >>>> - ASUS M5A99X Evo - AM3+ - 990X - SATA 6Gbps and USB 3.0 - ATX DDR3 2133
    >>>> Motherboards
    >>>>
    >>>> I am thinking about the following ...
    >>>>
    >>>> - Crucial Ballistix 240-Pin DDR3
    >>>>
    >>>> but need help with the specific model and amount (at least 8 GB due to
    >>>> VirtualBox/VM usage).
    >>>>
    >>> Check the customer reviews on Newegg, for each product you are
    >>> interested in.
    >>>
    >>> Some RAM has a high enough failure rate, you should stay away
    >>> from it.
    >>>
    >>> The customer reviews, tells you what to avoid.

    >> Well I wouldn't go solely by some customer reviews. RAM by all the major
    >> suppliers (Crucial, Corsair, etc) is all good. Better to use RAM from the
    >> approved list suggested by the board maker Asus.
    >> --
    >> Glen Ventura
    >> MS MVP Oct. 2002 - Sept. 2009
    >> CompTIA A+

    >
    >
    > Thanks, the customer reviews led me to the following ...
    >
    > G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3
    > 12800) Desktop Memory Model
    > F3-12800CL9Q-16GBRL [$95]
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231315
    >
    > G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3
    > 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9Q-16GBXL [$95]
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231429
    >
    > But, they are not listed in the approved list suggested by the board maker
    > Asus.
    > Are these models okay or not?
    >
    > What is the difference between the two models above?
    > And, how is G.SKILL vs Crucial vs Corsair?
    >
    >


    F3-12800CL9Q-16GBXL "XMP for Intel capable"

    http://www.gskill.com/products.php?index=358

    F3-12800CL9Q-16GBRL (looks to be the same, only the tested motherboard list,
    as tested by them, looks older...)

    http://www.gskill.com/products.php?index=335

    Note that the modules are pretty tall, and you should check there
    is sufficient clearance underneath the CPU cooler. When modules get
    tall, sometimes the modules can't be pulled out of the motherboard,
    while a third party CPU cooler is installed. (This might not matter
    if installing just two sticks, but with four sticks, all slots
    are likely to be occupied, and then clearance might be a
    "convenience issue".)

    The Newegg marketing material mentions AMD compatibility, whereas
    the Gskill web page is pushing the XMP tables in the SPD on the DIMM
    as the desirable feature.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_Presence_Detect#Extreme_Memory_Profile_.28XMP.29

    *******

    You tell by the Newegg reviews, whether they know how to make
    modules or not. The "79% with 5 stars" reviews, tells you
    something.

    These Crucial modules, got "83% with 5 starts", but not nearly
    as many people bought them. And these have "flashing LEDS" :)

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148519

    These Corsair modules, got "83% with 5 stars" on a fairly large
    sample size.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145345

    "Cons: Failed 2 weeks after putting into a new build."

    "Faulty Ram in under a year"

    "After 1 week, one of the sticks died"

    I'd probably scroll down, and see how common that was.

    *******

    They call this an "arbitrary judgment system" for a reason :)

    The trick is to detect "signal from noise".

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jul 1, 2012
    #2
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  3. Adam

    Adam Guest

    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:jsp9ih$emt$...
    > Adam wrote:
    >> "glee" <> wrote in message
    >> news:jsok8q$n35$...
    >>> "Paul" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:jsnbfg$83k$...
    >>>> Adam wrote:
    >>>>> Need RAM recommendation for the following motherboard ...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> - ASUS M5A99X Evo - AM3+ - 990X - SATA 6Gbps and USB 3.0 - ATX DDR3
    >>>>> 2133 Motherboards
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I am thinking about the following ...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> - Crucial Ballistix 240-Pin DDR3
    >>>>>
    >>>>> but need help with the specific model and amount (at least 8 GB due to
    >>>>> VirtualBox/VM usage).
    >>>>>
    >>>> Check the customer reviews on Newegg, for each product you are
    >>>> interested in.
    >>>>
    >>>> Some RAM has a high enough failure rate, you should stay away
    >>>> from it.
    >>>>
    >>>> The customer reviews, tells you what to avoid.
    >>> Well I wouldn't go solely by some customer reviews. RAM by all the
    >>> major suppliers (Crucial, Corsair, etc) is all good. Better to use RAM
    >>> from the approved list suggested by the board maker Asus.
    >>> --
    >>> Glen Ventura
    >>> MS MVP Oct. 2002 - Sept. 2009
    >>> CompTIA A+

    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks, the customer reviews led me to the following ...
    >>
    >> G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3
    >> 12800) Desktop Memory Model
    >> F3-12800CL9Q-16GBRL [$95]
    >> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231315
    >>
    >> G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3
    >> 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9Q-16GBXL [$95]
    >> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231429
    >>
    >> But, they are not listed in the approved list suggested by the board
    >> maker Asus.
    >> Are these models okay or not?
    >>
    >> What is the difference between the two models above?
    >> And, how is G.SKILL vs Crucial vs Corsair?
    >>

    >
    > F3-12800CL9Q-16GBXL "XMP for Intel capable"
    >
    > http://www.gskill.com/products.php?index=358
    >
    > F3-12800CL9Q-16GBRL (looks to be the same, only the tested motherboard
    > list,
    > as tested by them, looks older...)
    >
    > http://www.gskill.com/products.php?index=335
    >
    > Note that the modules are pretty tall, and you should check there
    > is sufficient clearance underneath the CPU cooler. When modules get
    > tall, sometimes the modules can't be pulled out of the motherboard,
    > while a third party CPU cooler is installed. (This might not matter
    > if installing just two sticks, but with four sticks, all slots
    > are likely to be occupied, and then clearance might be a
    > "convenience issue".)
    >
    > The Newegg marketing material mentions AMD compatibility, whereas
    > the Gskill web page is pushing the XMP tables in the SPD on the DIMM
    > as the desirable feature.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_Presence_Detect#Extreme_Memory_Profile_.28XMP.29
    >
    > *******
    >
    > You tell by the Newegg reviews, whether they know how to make
    > modules or not. The "79% with 5 stars" reviews, tells you
    > something.
    >
    > These Crucial modules, got "83% with 5 starts", but not nearly
    > as many people bought them. And these have "flashing LEDS" :)
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148519
    >
    > These Corsair modules, got "83% with 5 stars" on a fairly large
    > sample size.
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145345
    >
    > "Cons: Failed 2 weeks after putting into a new build."
    >
    > "Faulty Ram in under a year"
    >
    > "After 1 week, one of the sticks died"
    >
    > I'd probably scroll down, and see how common that was.
    >
    > *******
    >
    > They call this an "arbitrary judgment system" for a reason :)
    >
    > The trick is to detect "signal from noise".
    >
    > Paul



    Thanks (Guru Paul), I will likely go with the first one on your list ...

    > F3-12800CL9Q-16GBXL "XMP for Intel capable"
    >
    > http://www.gskill.com/products.php?index=358



    after checking for height/space clearance at Fry's (or Microcenter).
     
    Adam, Jul 1, 2012
    #3
  4. Adam wrote:
    >
    > the customer reviews led me to the following ...
    >
    > G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3
    > 12800) Desktop Memory Model
    > F3-12800CL9Q-16GBRL [$95]
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231315
    >
    > G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3
    > 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9Q-16GBXL [$95]
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231429
    >
    > But, they are not listed in the approved list suggested by the board maker
    > Asus.
    > Are these models okay or not?
    >
    > What is the difference between the two models above?
    > And, how is G.SKILL vs Crucial vs Corsair?


    Corsair, G.Skill, Geil, Patriot, Mushkin, OCZ, Kingston are nothing
    special. Most of those companies (actually probably all but one of
    them) don't even test their products extensively but simply use PC-
    based testers, rather than the million-dollar machines that chip
    manufacturers use. One of those module companies even said it was OK
    for a module to show 2 errors during testing (except for their 2133
    MHz/PC17000 modules, which had to show 0 errors).

    Crucial is always good as long as you avoid anything with heatsinks on
    it. Another brand that's always good is Samsung, and their 1.35V DDR3
    modules will work in 1.5V motherboards.

    In general you should avoid any memory with heatsinks on it because
    they don't help at all and are actually a sign of low quality -- the
    manufacturer can hide no-name or overclocked chips under the
    heatsinks, and it's cheaper to slap on highly decorated heatsinks than
    to use better quality or faster chips. Also before buying modules
    with tall heatsinks, check the clearance between the DIMMs and the CPU
    heatsink.

    That's not to say everything without heatsinks is high quality. It's
    necessary to check the individual chips, and you want chips where the
    chip maker or their part number is clearly visible. Chip makers
    include Samsung/SEC, Elpida/RexChip, ProMOS, Hynix, Micron, Nanya/
    Inotera, and PowerChip.

    As for RipJaws specifically, APHnetworks reviewed a PC17000 model
    (2133 MHz) and found it was made with Hynix H5TQ2G83BFR-H9C chips.
    "H9C" means 1333 MHz:

    http://aphnetworks.com/reviews/g_skill_ripjaws_x_f3_17000cl9d_8gbxld_2x4gb/2

    I don't think G.Skill is worse in this respect than the vast majority
    of its competitors, but the use of overclocked chips could explain why
    plain-looking, no-heatsink Samsung PC12800 modules (1600 MHz) are so
    well known for being able to run faster than many heatsinked modules
    that are "rated" for 2133 MHz.
     
    larry moe 'n curly, Jul 2, 2012
    #4
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