Re: Netflix Oddity

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Patty Winter, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. Patty Winter

    Patty Winter Guest

    Has anyone here tried Netshade from the U.S. to access BBC iPlayer
    or ITV Player?


    Patty
    Patty Winter, Aug 26, 2012
    #1
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  2. Patty Winter

    Lewis Guest

    In message <5039a173$0$70426$>
    Patty Winter <> wrote:
    > Has anyone here tried Netshade from the U.S. to access BBC iPlayer
    > or ITV Player?


    I used Tunnelbear. As long as I set my DNS to some large public DNS it
    worked fine. If I used my ISPs DNS, it didn't work reliably. I used
    Google's DNS.

    --
    He'd never asked for an exciting life. What he really liked, what he
    sought on every occasion, was boredom. The trouble was that boredom
    tended to explode in your face. Just when he thought he'd found it he'd
    be suddenly involved in what he supposed other people - thoughtless,
    feckless people - would call an adventure. And he'd be forced to visit
    many strange lands and meet exotic and colourful people, although not
    for very long because usually he'd be running. He'd seen the creation of
    the universe, although not from a good seat, and had visited Hell and
    the afterlife. He'd been captured, imprisoned, rescued, lost and
    marooned. Sometimes it had all happened on the same day.
    Lewis, Aug 26, 2012
    #2
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  3. Patty Winter

    Patty Winter Guest

    In article <>,
    Lewis <> wrote:
    >
    >I used Tunnelbear. As long as I set my DNS to some large public DNS it
    >worked fine. If I used my ISPs DNS, it didn't work reliably. I used
    >Google's DNS.


    Where did you find a public UK DNS server that allows you to run
    the BBC and ITV players?

    I looked around for public DNSs several months ago and had trouble
    finding any in the UK. So that's why Netshade sounded interesting;
    they have their own servers if you don't want to use public ones.


    Patty
    Patty Winter, Aug 26, 2012
    #3
  4. Patty Winter

    Lewis Guest

    In message <503a5694$0$70346$>
    Patty Winter <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Lewis <> wrote:
    >>
    >>I used Tunnelbear. As long as I set my DNS to some large public DNS it
    >>worked fine. If I used my ISPs DNS, it didn't work reliably. I used
    >>Google's DNS.


    > Where did you find a public UK DNS server that allows you to run
    > the BBC and ITV players?


    That's not what I said. I said it didn't work with my ISPs DNS, so I
    used Google's public DNS.

    --
    The wages of sin is death, but so is the salary of virtue, and at least
    the evil get to go home early on Fridays. --Witches Abroad
    Lewis, Aug 27, 2012
    #4
  5. Patty Winter

    Patty Winter Guest

    In article <>,
    Lewis <> wrote:
    >In message <503a5694$0$70346$>
    > Patty Winter <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>,
    >> Lewis <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>I used Tunnelbear. As long as I set my DNS to some large public DNS it
    >>>worked fine. If I used my ISPs DNS, it didn't work reliably. I used
    >>>Google's DNS.

    >
    >> Where did you find a public UK DNS server that allows you to run
    >> the BBC and ITV players?

    >
    >That's not what I said. I said it didn't work with my ISPs DNS, so I
    >used Google's public DNS.



    Hmmm, okay, I thought that public DNS servers and Google's servers
    were two different things, both of which worked for you with Tunnelbear.
    But I just found this page on Google's website:

    https://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/

    which refers to Google as having public DNS servers, so I guess you
    were using "public" and "Google" interchangeably. However, I don't
    see any option of a UK-based Google DNS server.

    So can you tell me exactly which public and/or Google DNS servers
    you used to access BBC iPlayer and ITV Player with your browser
    through Tunnelbear? Or can you point me toward a list of those
    IP addresses? Thanks!


    Patty
    Patty Winter, Aug 27, 2012
    #5
  6. In article <5039a173$0$70426$>,
    Patty Winter <> wrote:

    > Has anyone here tried Netshade from the U.S. to access BBC iPlayer
    > or ITV Player?
    >
    >
    > Patty


    I use Witopia for that. You get what you pay for. I just bought one of
    these too:

    http://www.zotacusa.com/zbox-id41-plus.html

    to run XBMC in my living room through Witopia to get the BBC and ITV and
    all the American stuff, like Hulu.

    No, it's not a Mac Mini. I don't need a Mac Mini in my living room. I'll
    install Arch Linux on it.

    --

    Fine then, I'm drinking coffee and rolling cigarettes and looking
    out at the hot baked street and a lady just walked by wiggling it
    in tight white pants, and we are not dead yet.
    Wilbur Eleven, Aug 27, 2012
    #6
  7. In article <503ad98f$0$70416$>,
    Patty Winter <> wrote:

    > So can you tell me exactly which public and/or Google DNS servers
    > you used to access BBC iPlayer and ITV Player with your browser
    > through Tunnelbear? Or can you point me toward a list of those
    > IP addresses? Thanks!


    These are the IP addresses for Google's DNS:

    8.8.8.8
    8.8.4.4

    I use them; they're assigned in my router. You do need a bit of spoon
    feeding, don't you, darlin'?

    https://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/docs/using#setup

    Still and all, you should look into Witopia.

    --

    Fine then, I'm drinking coffee and rolling cigarettes and looking
    out at the hot baked street and a lady just walked by wiggling it
    in tight white pants, and we are not dead yet.
    Wilbur Eleven, Aug 27, 2012
    #7
  8. Patty Winter

    Patty Winter Guest

    U.S. access to BBC iPlayer/ITV Player (was Re: Netflix Oddity)

    In article <k1fl5a$5b2$>,
    Wilbur Eleven <> wrote:
    >In article <503ad98f$0$70416$>,
    > Patty Winter <> wrote:
    >
    >> So can you tell me exactly which public and/or Google DNS servers
    >> you used to access BBC iPlayer and ITV Player with your browser
    >> through Tunnelbear? Or can you point me toward a list of those
    >> IP addresses? Thanks!

    >
    >These are the IP addresses for Google's DNS:
    >
    >8.8.8.8
    >8.8.4.4
    >
    >I use them; they're assigned in my router. You do need a bit of spoon
    >feeding, don't you, darlin'?


    No I don't, sweetheart. Those are the exact IP addresses I found
    on the Google webpage I cited. But they are not in blocks assigned
    to the UK, and there is no mention either on that page or the FAQ
    page of being able to use them to emulate being in the UK, only to
    hide one's own IP address.


    >https://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/docs/using#setup


    I know how to configure my Macs to use different DNS servers.
    I've done it a number of times over the years.


    >Still and all, you should look into Witopia.


    I think I did once, but considering how infrequently I would need
    a UK IP address, it didn't seem worth the cost to me. But if somone
    can assure me that it works with those remote video players, I'll
    check on it again.

    So anyone here who has accessed BBC iPlayer and/or ITV Player from
    the U.S. with a Mac, what software and DNS server have you used?
    Netshade? Tunnelbear? Witopia? Something else?


    Patty
    Patty Winter, Aug 27, 2012
    #8
  9. Re: U.S. access to BBC iPlayer/ITV Player (was Re: Netflix Oddity)

    In article <503ba515$0$70412$>,
    Patty Winter <> wrote:

    > In article <k1fl5a$5b2$>,
    > Wilbur Eleven <> wrote:
    > >In article <503ad98f$0$70416$>,
    > > Patty Winter <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> So can you tell me exactly which public and/or Google DNS servers
    > >> you used to access BBC iPlayer and ITV Player with your browser
    > >> through Tunnelbear? Or can you point me toward a list of those
    > >> IP addresses? Thanks!

    > >
    > >These are the IP addresses for Google's DNS:
    > >
    > >8.8.8.8
    > >8.8.4.4
    > >
    > >I use them; they're assigned in my router. You do need a bit of spoon
    > >feeding, don't you, darlin'?

    >
    > No I don't, sweetheart. Those are the exact IP addresses I found
    > on the Google webpage I cited. But they are not in blocks assigned
    > to the UK, and there is no mention either on that page or the FAQ
    > page of being able to use them to emulate being in the UK, only to
    > hide one's own IP address.
    >
    >
    > >https://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/docs/using#setup

    >
    > I know how to configure my Macs to use different DNS servers.
    > I've done it a number of times over the years.
    >
    >
    > >Still and all, you should look into Witopia.

    >
    > I think I did once, but considering how infrequently I would need
    > a UK IP address, it didn't seem worth the cost to me. But if somone
    > can assure me that it works with those remote video players, I'll
    > check on it again.
    >
    > So anyone here who has accessed BBC iPlayer and/or ITV Player from
    > the U.S. with a Mac, what software and DNS server have you used?
    > Netshade? Tunnelbear? Witopia? Something else?
    >
    >
    > Patty


    I'm sorry. Srsly. I'm used to people asking silly questions that are a
    right-click away. I haven't changed those DNS settings for a
    couple-three years; your VPN wormhole uses its own DNS wherever it pops
    out.

    Witopia allow you to install their stuff on all the computers in your
    house, but they restrict you to two connections at a time. That's fine
    for us. The Mac Pro gets one and the Zotac/XBMC box in the living room
    gets the other. The oul' Woman doesn't use her MacBook for that kind of
    thing.

    I live in Canada. I use Witopia to get the BBC etc. and also to get Hulu
    and the US Netflix. Here's the big secret about Netflix: you can sign up
    with a Canadian account and then set your VPN to Denver or somewhere and
    you get access to the US Netflix which has about 10000000000% more
    content the the Canukistani Netflix. It's all one big company, though.
    If they think you're in Denver then you get the Denver content.

    --

    Fine then, I'm drinking coffee and rolling cigarettes and looking
    out at the hot baked street and a lady just walked by wiggling it
    in tight white pants, and we are not dead yet.
    Wilbur Eleven, Aug 27, 2012
    #9
  10. Patty Winter

    Patty Winter Guest

    Re: U.S. access to BBC iPlayer/ITV Player (was Re: Netflix Oddity)

    In article <k1gebj$bos$>,
    Wilbur Eleven <> wrote:

    [snip]


    >I live in Canada. I use Witopia to get the BBC etc. and also to get Hulu
    >and the US Netflix.


    Good to know, thanks.


    >Here's the big secret about Netflix: you can sign up
    >with a Canadian account and then set your VPN to Denver or somewhere and
    >you get access to the US Netflix which has about 10000000000% more
    >content the the Canukistani Netflix.


    I've heard that complaint from Netflix customers in Europe, too.


    Patty
    Patty Winter, Aug 27, 2012
    #10
  11. Patty Winter

    Lewis Guest

    In message <503ad98f$0$70416$>
    Patty Winter <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Lewis <> wrote:
    >>In message <503a5694$0$70346$>
    >> Patty Winter <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Lewis <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>I used Tunnelbear. As long as I set my DNS to some large public DNS it
    >>>>worked fine. If I used my ISPs DNS, it didn't work reliably. I used
    >>>>Google's DNS.

    >>
    >>> Where did you find a public UK DNS server that allows you to run
    >>> the BBC and ITV players?

    >>
    >>That's not what I said. I said it didn't work with my ISPs DNS, so I
    >>used Google's public DNS.



    > Hmmm, okay, I thought that public DNS servers and Google's servers
    > were two different things, both of which worked for you with Tunnelbear.
    > But I just found this page on Google's website:


    > https://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/


    > which refers to Google as having public DNS servers, so I guess you
    > were using "public" and "Google" interchangeably. However, I don't
    > see any option of a UK-based Google DNS server.


    In this case, "Google" was used as a subset of "public".

    > So can you tell me exactly which public and/or Google DNS servers
    > you used to access BBC iPlayer and ITV Player with your browser
    > through Tunnelbear? Or can you point me toward a list of those
    > IP addresses? Thanks!


    I used 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 which, as far as I know, are the only public
    Google DNS servers. There are other public servers (OpenDNS, for
    example), which also seem to work just fine with TunnelBear. ISP DNS did
    not work (neither did my own DNS servers, but that is understandable).

    --
    I leave symbols to the symbol-minded - George Carlin
    Lewis, Aug 28, 2012
    #11
  12. Patty Winter

    Lewis Guest

    Re: U.S. access to BBC iPlayer/ITV Player (was Re: Netflix Oddity)

    In message <k1gebj$bos$>
    Wilbur Eleven <> wrote:
    > I live in Canada. I use Witopia to get the BBC etc. and also to get Hulu
    > and the US Netflix. Here's the big secret about Netflix: you can sign up
    > with a Canadian account and then set your VPN to Denver or somewhere and
    > you get access to the US Netflix which has about 10000000000% more
    > content the the Canukistani Netflix. It's all one big company, though.
    > If they think you're in Denver then you get the Denver content.


    OH, so *you* were the rat who was hacking my VPN?

    I probably shouldn't have set the password to "netflix4all", huh?

    That's ok, it's fixed now, I changed it to nsv8DSp9P@6p89aw4e$89

    Good luck getting in now!


    --
    i wasn't born a programmer. i became one because i was impatient. - Dave
    Winer
    Lewis, Aug 28, 2012
    #12
  13. Patty Winter

    Patty Winter Guest

    In article <>,
    Lewis <> wrote:
    >In message <503ad98f$0$70416$>
    > Patty Winter <> wrote:


    [big snip]


    >> So can you tell me exactly which public and/or Google DNS servers
    >> you used to access BBC iPlayer and ITV Player with your browser
    >> through Tunnelbear? Or can you point me toward a list of those
    >> IP addresses? Thanks!

    >
    >I used 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 which, as far as I know, are the only public
    >Google DNS servers.


    Interesting, thanks for the info. I would have expected the BBC
    and ITV websites to consider those as California IPs and block
    them from their video players.


    >There are other public servers (OpenDNS, for
    >example), which also seem to work just fine with TunnelBear.


    Okay, thanks for that, too.


    Patty
    Patty Winter, Aug 28, 2012
    #13
  14. In article <503c552a$0$70381$>,
    Patty Winter <> wrote:

    > Interesting, thanks for the info. I would have expected the BBC
    > and ITV websites to consider those as California IPs and block
    > them from their video players.


    The whole point of the SSL rabbit/worm hole is to make you look like
    you're somewhere else. Once you pop out, your DNS is the DNS of the
    server on the other side of that looking glass.

    Bad news on the Netflix front: it won't run on Linux through lack of
    Silverlight and intransigence on the part of the Netflix assholes. Hulu
    works a treat, though. That kind of thing (intransigence) annoys hacker,
    and I can bet that someone somewhere is just about to release a hacked
    Netflix. Netflix runs fine on OS X.

    --

    Fine then, I'm drinking coffee and rolling cigarettes and looking
    out at the hot baked street and a lady just walked by wiggling it
    in tight white pants, and we are not dead yet.
    Wilbur Eleven, Aug 28, 2012
    #14
  15. Patty Winter

    Paul Sture Guest

    On Tue, 28 Aug 2012 05:20:42 +0000, Patty Winter wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Lewis <> wrote:
    >>In message <503ad98f$0$70416$>
    >> Patty Winter <> wrote:

    >
    > [big snip]
    >
    >
    >>> So can you tell me exactly which public and/or Google DNS servers you
    >>> used to access BBC iPlayer and ITV Player with your browser through
    >>> Tunnelbear? Or can you point me toward a list of those IP addresses?
    >>> Thanks!

    >>
    >>I used 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 which, as far as I know, are the only public
    >>Google DNS servers.

    >
    > Interesting, thanks for the info. I would have expected the BBC and ITV
    > websites to consider those as California IPs and block them from their
    > video players.


    Patty, I don't think any website has access to which DNS server you are
    using. How DNS works is that some combination of your computer /
    router / external DNS service translates a text address to a numeric IP
    address, and the actual request that gets sent is via that numeric
    address.

    I have come across a fair few recommendations for Google DNS, OpenDNS and
    others from folks spread across Europe, simply because they found those
    services faster, more reliable or less restrictive than their own ISP's
    offerings.

    To expand on the "less restrictive" there, back in Panther/Tiger days I
    had difficulty getting my cheap router to do DNS properly, so I simply
    put my ISP's DNS servers into Network Preferences. That worked like a
    charm since that ISP let me get into their DNS servers when I was away
    from home. They have since tightened their policy so that only folks
    coming in from their own network can use their DNS servers: enter the
    likes of Google or OpenDNS which can be accessed from anywhere.


    Yes, an internet service you are using might do a reverse lookup of the
    IP address, but they will be using their own DNS servers to do that, and
    if you are routing via a service located in the UK, that is what they
    will see.

    --
    Paul Sture
    Paul Sture, Aug 28, 2012
    #15
  16. Patty Winter

    Lewis Guest

    In message <503c552a$0$70381$>
    Patty Winter <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Lewis <> wrote:
    >>In message <503ad98f$0$70416$>
    >> Patty Winter <> wrote:


    > [big snip]



    >>> So can you tell me exactly which public and/or Google DNS servers
    >>> you used to access BBC iPlayer and ITV Player with your browser
    >>> through Tunnelbear? Or can you point me toward a list of those
    >>> IP addresses? Thanks!

    >>
    >>I used 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 which, as far as I know, are the only public
    >>Google DNS servers.


    > Interesting, thanks for the info. I would have expected the BBC
    > and ITV websites to consider those as California IPs and block
    > them from their video players.


    I don't think you understand what DNS is. You are connecting to BBC and
    ITV with a UK IP address, that's what tunnelbear does.

    --
    MEGAHAL: within my penguin lies a torrid story of hate and love.
    Lewis, Aug 28, 2012
    #16
  17. Patty Winter

    JF Mezei Guest

    Wilbur Eleven wrote:

    > Netflix. Netflix runs fine on OS X.


    Netflix does not run "fine" on OS-X. It doesn't run unless you agree to
    install that Silverlight aberration.
    JF Mezei, Aug 28, 2012
    #17
  18. JF Mezei <> writes:

    > Wilbur Eleven wrote:
    >
    > > Netflix. Netflix runs fine on OS X.

    >
    > Netflix does not run "fine" on OS-X. It doesn't run unless you agree to
    > install that Silverlight aberration.


    I think that is what Wilbur said, but you snipped it out. In
    particular he wrote that Netflix doesn't run on linux because of the
    unavailablility of Silverfish^W - I mean Silverlight for that
    platform.
    Doug Anderson, Aug 28, 2012
    #18
  19. Patty Winter

    Patty Winter Guest

    In article <k1ipg4$dv3$>,
    Lewis <> wrote:
    >
    > You are connecting to BBC and
    >ITV with a UK IP address, that's what tunnelbear does.


    And who is supplying the UK IP address?


    Patty
    Patty Winter, Aug 28, 2012
    #19
  20. Patty Winter

    JF Mezei Guest

    Patty Winter wrote:

    >> You are connecting to BBC and
    >>ITV with a UK IP address, that's what tunnelbear does.

    >
    > And who is supplying the UK IP address?


    You have IP address 1 (IP-1) which is supplied by your local ISP. This
    IP routes from internet to your computer and can be identified to your
    country.

    Using IP-1, you connect to a VPN server in the UK. This creates a tunnel
    between your computer and the VPN server through which you can funnel
    entire IP packets. The tunnel is a point to point service and packets
    inside those containers are treated as data and not routed.

    The VPN software also includes an IP negotiation protocole which will
    give your computer a UK based IP address (IP-2) that routes back to the
    VPN server and geolocated in the UK.

    So your computer will build a packet using IP-2 as the source and BBC IP
    address as destination. It then encapsulates this packet into another on
    where the source is IP-1 and destination is the VPN server.

    That container packet then gets on the internet and is delivered to the
    VPN server. VPN server unpacks the container and takes the original
    packet and puts it onto the internet. So, from the BBC's point of view,
    they get a packet where the "from" IP address belongs to the VPN server
    in the UK and is thus geolocated in the UK.

    When the BBC sends a packet to you, it sends it to IP_2 which is routed
    to the VPN server in the UK. That VPN server gets the pacets and builds
    a container around it with the destination IP being your IP-1 (your
    local) one and thus it gets delivered to your computer which then
    unpacks the packet from the container and processes the response from BBC.

    Note that in the case of Netflix, there are different twists to this.
    Because they use CDNs, they do the geolocation tricks with DNS. Netflix
    may point you to "server.netflix.com" in all of its forms. But it is
    when you try to translate server.netflix.com to an IP address that the
    geolocation magic happens and the IP given in the response depends on
    whether you are in USA or Canada (or UK now that netflix is there too)

    A service such as unblock-us acts as a DNS which filters those requests.
    So instead of forwarding the request to translate "server.netflix.com"
    to to netflix geolocating servers, unblock-us pretends it is
    authoritative and provides its own response which points to the IP
    address used to serve USA based requests.
    JF Mezei, Aug 28, 2012
    #20
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