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Replacement for D865PERL??

Discussion in 'Intel' started by cew, Nov 28, 2007.

  1. cew

    cew Guest

    After trying a new disk, a fresh W2K install, a new AGP card, switching
    RAM modules around, (nothing else except MB and CPU), and completely
    disassembling and re assembling the computer, it looks like my D865PERL
    is flaky. First it was silent, complete lockups after S3 wakeup, and now
    also when trying to cold boot. (cold literally means after the computer
    sits powered off for a few hours.)

    I don't need or want any more capability than the 865, and I'd like to
    reuse my CPU, RAM, and AGP.

    What do you recommend as a replacement MB - Intel or not.
    Thanks.
    cew, Nov 28, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 16:50:51 -0700, cew <> wrote:

    >I don't need or want any more capability than the 865, and I'd like to
    >reuse my CPU, RAM, and AGP.
    >What do you recommend as a replacement MB - Intel or not.
    >Thanks.


    The problem is that all of your components are no longer compatible with
    current offerings. You're just not going to find anything sold in the
    stores that accepts a socket 478 processor, DDR memory, and AGP card. If
    you find a motherboard that does accept a 478 CPU, it will only have PCI-E
    x16 for the video and/or DDR2 memory slots. Newer motherboards also
    require a 24-pin power supply, although you can still use a 20-pin power
    supply if your video card doesn't require a lot of current.

    If you browse to eBay a few people are selling your motherboard. Then
    there's your local Craigslist. Somebody there may have an older motherboard
    for sale. Asus is an ok brand. Another way to go is just buy a complete
    used system (less display) and forget about using your components. There
    are some great deals out there on systems only 2 or 3 years old.
    Especially with the holidays coming up, people are both looking to generate
    some cash or to get rid of a system replaced by something under the Holiday
    Tree:)

    Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this
    non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real
    reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an
    di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system
    Per maggiori informazioni |For more info
    https://www.mixmaster.it
    George Orwell, Nov 29, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. cew

    cew Guest

    George Orwell wrote:

    On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 16:50:51 -0700, cew &lt;&gt; wrote:



    I don't need or want any more capability than the 865, and I'd like to reuse my CPU, RAM, and AGP. What do you recommend as a replacement MB - Intel or not. Thanks.



    The problem is that all of your components are no longer compatible with current offerings. You're just not going to find anything sold in the stores that accepts a socket 478 processor, DDR memory, and AGP card. If you find a motherboard that does accept a 478 CPU, it will only have PCI-E x16 for the video and/or DDR2 memory slots. Newer motherboards also require a 24-pin power supply, although you can still use a 20-pin power supply if your video card doesn't require a lot of current. If you browse to eBay a few people are selling your motherboard. Then there's your local Craigslist. Somebody there may have an older motherboard for sale. Asus is an ok brand. Another way to go is just buy a complete used system (less display) and forget about using your components. There are some great deals out there on systems only 2 or 3 years old. Especially with the holidays coming up, people are both looking to generate some cash or to get rid of a system replaced by something under the Holiday Tree:) Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system Per maggiori informazioni |For more info https://www.mixmaster.it

    D865PESOL ? - 478 socket, DDR, AGP. Can a microATX be installed in a mid-size case?
    Asus P4P800-SE ? - 478 socket, DDR, AGP
    Abit IS7-E2G ? - 478 socket, DDR, AGP
    cew, Nov 29, 2007
    #3
  4. cew

    cew Guest

    George Orwell wrote:

    On Wed, 28 Nov 2007 16:50:51 -0700, cew &lt;&gt; wrote:



    I don't need or want any more capability than the 865, and I'd like to reuse my CPU, RAM, and AGP. What do you recommend as a replacement MB - Intel or not. Thanks.



    The problem is that all of your components are no longer compatible with current offerings. You're just not going to find anything sold in the stores that accepts a socket 478 processor, DDR memory, and AGP card. If you find a motherboard that does accept a 478 CPU, it will only have PCI-E x16 for the video and/or DDR2 memory slots. Newer motherboards also require a 24-pin power supply, although you can still use a 20-pin power supply if your video card doesn't require a lot of current. If you browse to eBay a few people are selling your motherboard. Then there's your local Craigslist. Somebody there may have an older motherboard for sale. Asus is an ok brand. Another way to go is just buy a complete used system (less display) and forget about using your components. There are some great deals out there on systems only 2 or 3 years old. Especially with the holidays coming up, people are both looking to generate some cash or to get rid of a system replaced by something under the Holiday Tree:) Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system Per maggiori informazioni |For more info https://www.mixmaster.it

    D875PBZ ? - 478 socket, DDR, AGP
    cew, Nov 29, 2007
    #4
  5. cew

    cew Guest

    Replaced RAM - better, but --

    cew wrote:
    > After trying a new disk, a fresh W2K install, a new AGP card,
    > switching RAM modules around, (nothing else except MB and CPU), and
    > completely disassembling and re assembling the computer, it looks like
    > my D865PERL is flaky. First it was silent, complete lockups after S3
    > wakeup, and now also when trying to cold boot. (cold literally means
    > after the computer sits powered off for a few hours.)
    >
    > I don't need or want any more capability than the 865, and I'd like to
    > reuse my CPU, RAM, and AGP.
    >
    > What do you recommend as a replacement MB - Intel or not.
    > Thanks.

    In case this is of interest to anyone ---
    I replaced my DRAM with a Crucial (Micron) 1G kit. Symptoms are much
    reduced. Sometimes the computer goes through several S3 standby cycles,
    even over night, with no problems. And no more multiple resets to get
    the computer to boot. But it does still hang sometimes after S3
    standby. I'll try a different PS, as Mr. Orwell suggested, before
    changing MBs.
    cew, Dec 8, 2007
    #5
  6. Re: Replaced RAM - better, but --

    On Sat, 08 Dec 2007 09:19:24 -0700, cew <> wrote:

    >I replaced my DRAM with a Crucial (Micron) 1G kit. Symptoms are much
    >reduced. Sometimes the computer goes through several S3 standby cycles,
    >even over night, with no problems. And no more multiple resets to get
    >the computer to boot. But it does still hang sometimes after S3
    >standby. I'll try a different PS, as Mr. Orwell suggested, before
    >changing MBs.


    If you can get your computer stable just booting an OS and running
    applications, maybe that's enough. I recently changed cases to an Antec
    Solo with Seasonic S12 430w PS. The system runs very quiet and stable.

    As an experiment I tried running Vista on the D865PERL. Everything works
    fine except the Analog Devices AD1985 onboard audio. There aren't any
    Vista audio drivers at the Intel website for this motherboard nor does it
    appear there ever will.

    Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this
    non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real
    reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an
    di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system
    Per maggiori informazioni |For more info
    https://www.mixmaster.it
    George Orwell, Dec 8, 2007
    #6
  7. cew

    cew Guest

    Re: Replaced RAM - better, but --

    George Orwell wrote:

    On Sat, 08 Dec 2007 09:19:24 -0700, cew &lt;&gt; wrote:



    I replaced my DRAM with a Crucial (Micron) 1G kit. Symptoms are much reduced. Sometimes the computer goes through several S3 standby cycles, even over night, with no problems. And no more multiple resets to get the computer to boot. But it does still hang sometimes after S3 standby. I'll try a different PS, as Mr. Orwell suggested, before changing MBs.



    If you can get your computer stable just booting an OS and running applications, maybe that's enough. I recently changed cases to an Antec Solo with Seasonic S12 430w PS. The system runs very quiet and stable. As an experiment I tried running Vista on the D865PERL. Everything works fine except the Analog Devices AD1985 onboard audio. There aren't any Vista audio drivers at the Intel website for this motherboard nor does it appear there ever will. Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system Per maggiori informazioni |For more info https://www.mixmaster.it

    I've only had two computers with S3 capability. The first one built on a VC820, with W98SE and W2K, worked fine for 5 years (and still does). This one worked fine for over a year, then started having problems. I would really like to get it working right again.
    At this point, it HAS to be either the PS or the MB. Neither very expensive to try. Right now, I'd guess S3 wakeup works about 2/3 of the time without a subsequent hang. Thanks for you help.
    btw, how can you not be related to a real person? Unless you're pure, self-writing software.
    cew, Dec 8, 2007
    #7
  8. cew

    Frito Lay Guest

    Re: Replaced RAM - better, but --

    On Sat, 08 Dec 2007 16:53:52 -0700, cew <> wrote:

    >btw, how can you not be related to a real person? Unless you're pure,
    >self-writing software.


    Life is full of mysteries. How come your posts suddenly appear as HTML?
    In order to read your messages I have to change my newsreader to display
    the raw message vs. the plain text setting. I only mention this as you may
    be unaware that it's happening.
    Frito Lay, Dec 9, 2007
    #8
  9. cew

    cew Guest

    Re: Replaced RAM - better, but --

    Frito Lay wrote:
    > On Sat, 08 Dec 2007 16:53:52 -0700, cew <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> btw, how can you not be related to a real person? Unless you're pure,
    >> self-writing software.
    >>

    >
    > Life is full of mysteries. How come your posts suddenly appear as HTML?
    > In order to read your messages I have to change my newsreader to display
    > the raw message vs. the plain text setting. I only mention this as you may
    > be unaware that it's happening.
    >
    >

    Probably because I made a mistake and selected HTML when I sent them. Sorry.
    cew, Dec 9, 2007
    #9
  10. cew

    cew Guest

    Sorry, Intel

    I wrongly maligned you. Looks like my problem was the P/S, or maybe P/S and Ram.
    Replaced an Antec 450w Smart Power with an Antec 550w Truepower Trio, and no problems for 4 days
    now. Goes into S3 standby instantly on request, wakes up instantly on request with no hangups, and
    does not spontaneously wake up in the middle of the night anymore.
    I noticed that the new P/S output voltages, as reported by Intel Active Manager, are all rock solid.
    Looks like a static image. The old P/S showed a lot of ripple around nominal - never out of range
    that I saw, but ripple.
    The computer is also staying cool at lower fan speeds, and slightly quieter.

    Thanks for the help -- should have listened to Mr. Orwell at the start.
    cew, Dec 16, 2007
    #10
  11. Re: Sorry, Intel

    On Sun, 16 Dec 2007 10:14:24 -0700, cew <> wrote:

    >does not spontaneously wake up in the middle of the night anymore.


    I have a Microsoft wireless optical IntelliMouse. The receiver is USB and
    came with a green USB to PS/2 adapter. Using this setup I could never keep
    my computer asleep. The slightest breeze, vibration, or movement, even a
    piece of dust falling, would be enough to wake the system up. All my
    research came up with other people complaining of the same thing and no
    solution.

    What worked though was to ditch the USB to PS/2 adapter and plug the
    receiver directly into a USB port. With this setup the mouse is dead to
    the world when the system is asleep. Only by pressing any key on the wired
    PS/2 keyboard wakes the system up, which is how it should be. Why a funky
    power supply would cause your system to spontaneously wakeup is unknown.
    Do you have any pets or other critters in your house that could walk across
    the sleeping system keyboard?

    Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this
    non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real
    reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an
    di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system
    Per maggiori informazioni |For more info
    https://www.mixmaster.it
    George Orwell, Dec 16, 2007
    #11
  12. cew

    cew Guest

    Re: Sorry, Intel

    George Orwell wrote:
    > On Sun, 16 Dec 2007 10:14:24 -0700, cew <> wrote:
    >
    >> does not spontaneously wake up in the middle of the night anymore.

    >
    > I have a Microsoft wireless optical IntelliMouse. The receiver is USB and
    > came with a green USB to PS/2 adapter. Using this setup I could never keep
    > my computer asleep. The slightest breeze, vibration, or movement, even a
    > piece of dust falling, would be enough to wake the system up. All my
    > research came up with other people complaining of the same thing and no
    > solution.
    >
    > What worked though was to ditch the USB to PS/2 adapter and plug the
    > receiver directly into a USB port. With this setup the mouse is dead to
    > the world when the system is asleep. Only by pressing any key on the wired
    > PS/2 keyboard wakes the system up, which is how it should be. Why a funky
    > power supply would cause your system to spontaneously wakeup is unknown.
    > Do you have any pets or other critters in your house that could walk across
    > the sleeping system keyboard?
    >
    > Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this
    > non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real
    > reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an
    > di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system
    > Per maggiori informazioni |For more info
    > https://www.mixmaster.it
    >

    Not that are ever in this part of the house. I have PS/2 mouse and keyboard, and always had that
    problem with this computer - even when there were no other, hang up problems. Same problem with
    previous computer I built. Don't know if the power supply or new Ram fixed that problem, but it does
    seem to be fixed.
    cew, Dec 16, 2007
    #12
  13. cew

    Ian D Guest

    Re: Sorry, Intel

    "cew" <> wrote in message
    news:%0d9j.79$...
    >I wrongly maligned you. Looks like my problem was the P/S, or maybe P/S and
    >Ram.
    > Replaced an Antec 450w Smart Power with an Antec 550w Truepower Trio, and
    > no problems for 4 days now. Goes into S3 standby instantly on request,
    > wakes up instantly on request with no hangups, and does not spontaneously
    > wake up in the middle of the night anymore.
    > I noticed that the new P/S output voltages, as reported by Intel Active
    > Manager, are all rock solid. Looks like a static image. The old P/S showed
    > a lot of ripple around nominal - never out of range that I saw, but
    > ripple.
    > The computer is also staying cool at lower fan speeds, and slightly
    > quieter.
    >
    > Thanks for the help -- should have listened to Mr. Orwell at the start.


    If the old P/S had a noisy +5V standby line, a sufficient negative pulse
    could, in turn,
    cause a momentary negative pulse from the keyboard or mouse, that is
    interpreted by
    the system as a keypress, causing it to wake up.
    Ian D, Dec 17, 2007
    #13
  14. cew

    malik.ayat

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    difference between 89C51RD2 and 89C51RD2BN

    plz tell me
    what is the difference between 89C51RD2 and 89C51RD2BN
    malik.ayat, Dec 17, 2007
    #14
  15. cew

    cew Guest

    Re: Sorry, Intel

    Ian D wrote:
    > "cew" <> wrote in message
    > news:%0d9j.79$...
    >> I wrongly maligned you. Looks like my problem was the P/S, or maybe P/S and
    >> Ram.
    >> Replaced an Antec 450w Smart Power with an Antec 550w Truepower Trio, and
    >> no problems for 4 days now. Goes into S3 standby instantly on request,
    >> wakes up instantly on request with no hangups, and does not spontaneously
    >> wake up in the middle of the night anymore.
    >> I noticed that the new P/S output voltages, as reported by Intel Active
    >> Manager, are all rock solid. Looks like a static image. The old P/S showed
    >> a lot of ripple around nominal - never out of range that I saw, but
    >> ripple.
    >> The computer is also staying cool at lower fan speeds, and slightly
    >> quieter.
    >>
    >> Thanks for the help -- should have listened to Mr. Orwell at the start.

    >
    > If the old P/S had a noisy +5V standby line, a sufficient negative pulse
    > could, in turn,
    > cause a momentary negative pulse from the keyboard or mouse, that is
    > interpreted by
    > the system as a keypress, causing it to wake up.
    >
    >

    As good a explanation as I've heard. Haven't had any way to monitor +5sb.
    cew, Dec 17, 2007
    #15
  16. cew

    w_tom Guest

    Re: Sorry, Intel

    On Dec 17, 10:09 am, cew <> wrote:
    > As good a explanation as I've heard. Haven't had any way to monitor +5sb.


    Appreciate that your 'old supply' problem may have existed even when
    the computer was built. It is normal for a computer to boot and work
    even if the power supply is defective. As the defective power supply
    ages, then the failure only gets worse enough to finally create other
    strange problems.

    Same thing that could have been done to avoid the problem months ago
    should also be performed on the new supply. Then you 'know' a power
    supply is working properly - not just hoping after four days.

    The tool is so inexpensive and 'so complex' as to be sold even to
    Kmart shoppers. The two minute procedure is described in "When your
    computer dies without warning....." starting 6 Feb 2007 in the
    newsgroup alt.windows-xp at:
    http://tinyurl.com/yvf9vh

    The relevant part, in your case, is measuring voltages on any one of
    orange, red, yellow, and purple wires when all peripherals are
    accessed (multitasked) simultaneously. That means complex graphics on
    the video controller, while sound card is making sound, why searching
    is ongoing on hard drive, while internet is being accessed, while ...
    get the idea? A full load - and only then are those voltages
    measures. Numbers must exceed 3.23, 4.87, and 11.7. If yes, then
    power supply is 100% functional. Again, the power supply could be
    defective and will still boot the computer. But those numbers can
    discover a power supply 'system' (which is more than just a power
    supply) as 'definitively good'. Your only useful answer is
    'definitive'.

    That motherboard voltage monitor also needs calibrating. Again, the
    meter is what calibrates those numbers so that the monitor can
    actually monitor.

    Was the monitor reporting excessive ripple? Not likely. Ripple
    voltages vary too fast for the monitor to see ripple. However the two
    minute procedure would also eliminate excessive ripple as a reason for
    failure.

    Another possible reason for unexpected wake ups were missing
    functions in that original power supply. When selling to computer
    assemblers, many power supplies are missing functions so that power
    supply price is a little lower and profits are significantly higher.
    Yes, the cheaper supply can even provide higher profits. How many
    computer assemblers would know of those missing functions?

    What is your best way to know those required functions are
    included? The power supply comes with a long list of written numeric
    specs. What is common among supplies that are missing essential
    functions? No written specs. Of course this is irrelevant to the
    more important point here. Until those voltage numbers are taken when
    supply is under full load, then you don't even know if the new supply
    is OK. Those same numbers may have identified the old supply as
    defective long before surprises were occurring. Power supply may have
    been defective even when the system was first built. Only numbers
    taken under full load would have identified the defective part - long
    before anomalies occurred.

    BTW, this also identified a good or bad +5VSB (purple wire) problem.
    w_tom, Dec 18, 2007
    #16
  17. cew

    cew Guest

    Re: Sorry, Intel

    w_tom wrote:
    > On Dec 17, 10:09 am, cew <> wrote:
    >> As good a explanation as I've heard. Haven't had any way to monitor +5sb.

    >
    > Appreciate that your 'old supply' problem may have existed even when
    > the computer was built. It is normal for a computer to boot and work
    > even if the power supply is defective. As the defective power supply
    > ages, then the failure only gets worse enough to finally create other
    > strange problems.
    >
    > Same thing that could have been done to avoid the problem months ago
    > should also be performed on the new supply. Then you 'know' a power
    > supply is working properly - not just hoping after four days.
    >
    > The tool is so inexpensive and 'so complex' as to be sold even to
    > Kmart shoppers. The two minute procedure is described in "When your
    > computer dies without warning....." starting 6 Feb 2007 in the
    > newsgroup alt.windows-xp at:
    > http://tinyurl.com/yvf9vh
    >
    > The relevant part, in your case, is measuring voltages on any one of
    > orange, red, yellow, and purple wires when all peripherals are
    > accessed (multitasked) simultaneously. That means complex graphics on
    > the video controller, while sound card is making sound, why searching
    > is ongoing on hard drive, while internet is being accessed, while ...
    > get the idea? A full load - and only then are those voltages
    > measures. Numbers must exceed 3.23, 4.87, and 11.7. If yes, then
    > power supply is 100% functional. Again, the power supply could be
    > defective and will still boot the computer. But those numbers can
    > discover a power supply 'system' (which is more than just a power
    > supply) as 'definitively good'. Your only useful answer is
    > 'definitive'.
    >
    > That motherboard voltage monitor also needs calibrating. Again, the
    > meter is what calibrates those numbers so that the monitor can
    > actually monitor.
    >
    > Was the monitor reporting excessive ripple? Not likely. Ripple
    > voltages vary too fast for the monitor to see ripple. However the two
    > minute procedure would also eliminate excessive ripple as a reason for
    > failure.
    >
    > Another possible reason for unexpected wake ups were missing
    > functions in that original power supply. When selling to computer
    > assemblers, many power supplies are missing functions so that power
    > supply price is a little lower and profits are significantly higher.
    > Yes, the cheaper supply can even provide higher profits. How many
    > computer assemblers would know of those missing functions?
    >
    > What is your best way to know those required functions are
    > included? The power supply comes with a long list of written numeric
    > specs. What is common among supplies that are missing essential
    > functions? No written specs. Of course this is irrelevant to the
    > more important point here. Until those voltage numbers are taken when
    > supply is under full load, then you don't even know if the new supply
    > is OK. Those same numbers may have identified the old supply as
    > defective long before surprises were occurring. Power supply may have
    > been defective even when the system was first built. Only numbers
    > taken under full load would have identified the defective part - long
    > before anomalies occurred.
    >
    > BTW, this also identified a good or bad +5VSB (purple wire) problem.
    >
    >


    http://www.antec.com/specs/SP450_spe.html
    How does 'under full load' have anything to do with +5Vstandby - no load on anything but that circuit.
    cew, Dec 18, 2007
    #17
  18. cew

    w_tom Guest

    Re: Sorry, Intel

    On Dec 18, 9:56 am, cew <> wrote:
    > http://www.antec.com/specs/SP450_spe.html
    > How does 'under full load' have anything to do with +5Vstandby - no load on anything but that circuit.


    First, +5VSB measurement requires full load from motherboard to be
    valid. Second, all voltages including +5VSB are powered from a common
    source. A failing part where +5VSB and other voltages obtain power
    would may only be obvious under full load. And finally, is the +5VSB
    completely independent from other voltages? Can you guarantee that?
    No.

    Numerous reasons why +5VSB must also be in spec when entire power
    supply is under full load. Numerous possible reasons for failure
    identified in but two minutes using numbers from a simple procedure.
    Numbers that, when posted here, may also result in further useful
    information. All those voltages must be stable when system is under
    maximum load to identify a defective (and maybe will fail in the
    future) power supply 'system'. Much useful information obtained in
    two minutes.

    BTW, better replies result from posting the numbers - not just
    posting some GO/NOGO (good or bad) conclusions. That means numbers
    even for the green and gray wires may expose a problem.

    Meanwhile, how did that motherboard BIOS measure ripple voltage?
    w_tom, Dec 19, 2007
    #18
  19. cew

    cew Guest

    Not so fast

    cew wrote:
    > After trying a new disk, a fresh W2K install, a new AGP card, switching
    > RAM modules around, (nothing else except MB and CPU), and completely
    > disassembling and re assembling the computer, it looks like my D865PERL
    > is flaky. First it was silent, complete lockups after S3 wakeup, and now
    > also when trying to cold boot. (cold literally means after the computer
    > sits powered off for a few hours.)
    >
    > I don't need or want any more capability than the 865, and I'd like to
    > reuse my CPU, RAM, and AGP.
    >
    > What do you recommend as a replacement MB - Intel or not.
    > Thanks.


    After a week and a half of working perfectly --
    my computer spontaneously woke up during the night,
    then hung up after wakeup the next day,
    then hung up twice more trying to reboot.
    It's DEFINITELY aliens messin' me. pssttsst-poof.
    cew, Dec 23, 2007
    #19
  20. Re: Not so fast

    On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 11:09:59 -0700, cew <> wrote:

    >> After trying a new disk, a fresh W2K install, a new AGP card, switching
    >> RAM modules around, (nothing else except MB and CPU), and completely
    >> disassembling and re assembling the computer, it looks like my D865PERL
    >> is flaky.

    >It's DEFINITELY aliens messin' me. pssttsst-poof.


    I just retired what appeared to work fine a D865PERL motherboard. Once out
    of the case I noticed 2 capacitors that are bulging on top. The one on the
    right looks like it might have oozed something.

    The two capacitors are tall cans directly above and on opposite ends of the
    first DDR socket. All the other capacitors on the board look normal.
    Maybe check your board again and look for any caps that are bulging or
    leaking on top. Overall I'm glad to have a new motherboard.

    Il mittente di questo messaggio|The sender address of this
    non corrisponde ad un utente |message is not related to a real
    reale ma all'indirizzo fittizio|person but to a fake address of an
    di un sistema anonimizzatore |anonymous system
    Per maggiori informazioni |For more info
    https://www.mixmaster.it
    George Orwell, Dec 28, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

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