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Southpaw Windows?

Discussion in 'Tablet PC' started by flibbertigibbet007, Feb 21, 2005.

  1. Chris maybe you can help or put in your advise for this.
    As I am a southpaw ("lefty" for people who dont understand) writing on a
    tablet makes it so much easier than writing in a binder with rings and oh god
    spiral binders... But now I want it easier (we always want things our way
    don't we?) I don't like too much reaching accross the screen to get to the
    scroll bars, in fact www.tabletpcbuzz.com has affectivly been able to move
    the vertical scroll for their pages if you change the setting for your
    profile. When or is MS going to impliment the ability to move the vertical
    scrolls to the left of the screen? (also other buttons, like minimize,
    restore, and close.) Or am i going to have to deal with blocking my veiw when
    trying to read long webpages with the scroll bar on the right side???
    -James
    flibbertigibbet007, Feb 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. flibbertigibbet007 wrote:
    > Chris maybe you can help or put in your advise for this.
    > As I am a southpaw ("lefty" for people who dont understand) writing on a
    > tablet makes it so much easier than writing in a binder with rings and oh god
    > spiral binders... But now I want it easier (we always want things our way
    > don't we?) I don't like too much reaching accross the screen to get to the
    > scroll bars, in fact www.tabletpcbuzz.com has affectivly been able to move
    > the vertical scroll for their pages if you change the setting for your
    > profile. When or is MS going to impliment the ability to move the vertical
    > scrolls to the left of the screen? (also other buttons, like minimize,
    > restore, and close.) Or am i going to have to deal with blocking my veiw when
    > trying to read long webpages with the scroll bar on the right side???


    If you search through history of this newsgroup, you'll see this has
    been asked & answered many times. It's not going to happen before the
    next version of Windows (code-named Longhorn). More details in the
    earlier posts, which you can find in the Google newsgroup archives.
    Mike Williams [MVP], Feb 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. flibbertigibbet007

    Chris H. Guest

    As Mike said, James, it isn't going to happen until the operating system
    itself changes. There are too many things, including most of the
    third-party applications, which cannot be moved or would be broken without
    rewriting the OS itself.

    The problem isn't that it can't be done on an individual basis with certain
    coding - like on the Buzz, within the web page structure itself - but, as
    you'll see if you review the history of posts here with this same question,
    it would force too many companies to spend lots and lots of money to be
    compatible.

    We've got a lefty daughter, and she copes with the scrolling by using the
    little down arrow (or up, as the case might be) without attempting to drag
    the scroll bar itself. That way, her hand is only in a corner and not fully
    across the screen itself.

    As a righty, I've found I prefer the Taskbar not at the bottom or top of the
    screen, but set on the left side using Auto Hide. You can drag the Taskbar
    to any of the four sides you'd like. My Start button is in the upper-left
    corner. My moving it to the left is so I can see what I want to select, so
    I would imagine you could use it on the right. :cool:

    Those three items in the upper-right corner of each program screen are fixed
    in the current operating system. Not only that, but they'll small and
    sometimes difficult to tap. I've heard talk of them automatically "zooming"
    when the pen is over them, giving us a larger target.

    One of the things to remember is Tablet PCs are less than three years old
    now, and the whole environment is really in its infancy. We've come a long
    way in less than 36 months, and it takes time to have adjustments to what
    "we" want. You have a solid suggestion, though, and I would submit it
    through the Product Feedback:
    http://register.microsoft.com/mswish/suggestion.asp Select "Other" in the
    Product: section and make sure you mention Tablet PC in the description box.
    --
    Chris H.
    Microsoft Windows MVP/Tablet PC
    Tablet Creations - http://nicecreations.us/
    Associate Expert
    Expert Zone - www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone


    "flibbertigibbet007" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > Chris maybe you can help or put in your advise for this.
    > As I am a southpaw ("lefty" for people who dont understand) writing on a
    > tablet makes it so much easier than writing in a binder with rings and oh
    > god
    > spiral binders... But now I want it easier (we always want things our way
    > don't we?) I don't like too much reaching accross the screen to get to the
    > scroll bars, in fact www.tabletpcbuzz.com has affectivly been able to move
    > the vertical scroll for their pages if you change the setting for your
    > profile. When or is MS going to impliment the ability to move the vertical
    > scrolls to the left of the screen? (also other buttons, like minimize,
    > restore, and close.) Or am i going to have to deal with blocking my veiw
    > when
    > trying to read long webpages with the scroll bar on the right side???
    > -James
    Chris H., Feb 21, 2005
    #3
  4. I read your website, and took your advice, and I too have my taskbar on the
    left side of the screen. And the start on the left top.
    I can't cope with the scroll bars on the (perverbial) 'wrong' side of the
    screen.
    And in responce to Mike, that was rude. I don't see everyone getting PO'd
    because of people posting in the wrong section.
    And a disapointment in longhorn, as I've heard (I hear lots of rumors), that
    it's designed for media center specifically? In this case also that it's to
    make use of the upcomming dual core proc's, which will outdate the tablet PC.
    And render the lightness and size of tablets useless. As I understand dual
    core would require bigger heat syncs, better cooling systems, and aren't
    expected for laptops (or tablets) any time soon.
    Plus I don't like the concept of needing to buy a new version of windows in
    2007. I'm happy with XP TPC with the few exceptions I note once in a while.
    But even if I do get longhorn, I don't want to have to buy a new tablet! (not
    at $2K a machine, and who knows what price it'll be in 2007), sure desktop
    prices are dropping, but with a dual core, and longhorn, I don't expect
    longhorn to do that well, people are going to want the bargain, and not spend
    the money for a high end (and this is going to be a highend thing.)

    Thats my few $'s worth.
    I think that abandoning XP, and TPC edition is a waste. Why not make what
    you've made better, instead of making a whole new thing.

    -James

    "Chris H." wrote:

    > As Mike said, James, it isn't going to happen until the operating system
    > itself changes. There are too many things, including most of the
    > third-party applications, which cannot be moved or would be broken without
    > rewriting the OS itself.
    >
    > The problem isn't that it can't be done on an individual basis with certain
    > coding - like on the Buzz, within the web page structure itself - but, as
    > you'll see if you review the history of posts here with this same question,
    > it would force too many companies to spend lots and lots of money to be
    > compatible.
    >
    > We've got a lefty daughter, and she copes with the scrolling by using the
    > little down arrow (or up, as the case might be) without attempting to drag
    > the scroll bar itself. That way, her hand is only in a corner and not fully
    > across the screen itself.
    >
    > As a righty, I've found I prefer the Taskbar not at the bottom or top of the
    > screen, but set on the left side using Auto Hide. You can drag the Taskbar
    > to any of the four sides you'd like. My Start button is in the upper-left
    > corner. My moving it to the left is so I can see what I want to select, so
    > I would imagine you could use it on the right. :cool:
    >
    > Those three items in the upper-right corner of each program screen are fixed
    > in the current operating system. Not only that, but they'll small and
    > sometimes difficult to tap. I've heard talk of them automatically "zooming"
    > when the pen is over them, giving us a larger target.
    >
    > One of the things to remember is Tablet PCs are less than three years old
    > now, and the whole environment is really in its infancy. We've come a long
    > way in less than 36 months, and it takes time to have adjustments to what
    > "we" want. You have a solid suggestion, though, and I would submit it
    > through the Product Feedback:
    > http://register.microsoft.com/mswish/suggestion.asp Select "Other" in the
    > Product: section and make sure you mention Tablet PC in the description box.
    > --
    > Chris H.
    > Microsoft Windows MVP/Tablet PC
    > Tablet Creations - http://nicecreations.us/
    > Associate Expert
    > Expert Zone - www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone
    >
    >
    > "flibbertigibbet007" <> wrote in
    > message news:...
    > > Chris maybe you can help or put in your advise for this.
    > > As I am a southpaw ("lefty" for people who dont understand) writing on a
    > > tablet makes it so much easier than writing in a binder with rings and oh
    > > god
    > > spiral binders... But now I want it easier (we always want things our way
    > > don't we?) I don't like too much reaching accross the screen to get to the
    > > scroll bars, in fact www.tabletpcbuzz.com has affectivly been able to move
    > > the vertical scroll for their pages if you change the setting for your
    > > profile. When or is MS going to impliment the ability to move the vertical
    > > scrolls to the left of the screen? (also other buttons, like minimize,
    > > restore, and close.) Or am i going to have to deal with blocking my veiw
    > > when
    > > trying to read long webpages with the scroll bar on the right side???
    > > -James

    >
    >
    >
    flibbertigibbet007, Feb 21, 2005
    #4
  5. flibbertigibbet007

    Chris H. Guest

    I wouldn't worry about whatever happens to be in Longhorn when it comes out.
    There's a very, very long way to go on that operating system yet. It is
    still only an Alpha version, and there has been no start of any beta for the
    test sites. Anything you may hear, unless it comes directly from Microsoft,
    is worth exactly what you pay for it. :cool:
    --
    Chris H.
    Microsoft Windows MVP/Tablet PC
    Tablet Creations - http://nicecreations.us/
    Associate Expert
    Expert Zone - www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone


    "flibbertigibbet007" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    >I read your website, and took your advice, and I too have my taskbar on the
    > left side of the screen. And the start on the left top.
    > I can't cope with the scroll bars on the (perverbial) 'wrong' side of the
    > screen.
    > And in responce to Mike, that was rude. I don't see everyone getting PO'd
    > because of people posting in the wrong section.
    > And a disapointment in longhorn, as I've heard (I hear lots of rumors),
    > that
    > it's designed for media center specifically? In this case also that it's
    > to
    > make use of the upcomming dual core proc's, which will outdate the tablet
    > PC.
    > And render the lightness and size of tablets useless. As I understand dual
    > core would require bigger heat syncs, better cooling systems, and aren't
    > expected for laptops (or tablets) any time soon.
    > Plus I don't like the concept of needing to buy a new version of windows
    > in
    > 2007. I'm happy with XP TPC with the few exceptions I note once in a
    > while.
    > But even if I do get longhorn, I don't want to have to buy a new tablet!
    > (not
    > at $2K a machine, and who knows what price it'll be in 2007), sure desktop
    > prices are dropping, but with a dual core, and longhorn, I don't expect
    > longhorn to do that well, people are going to want the bargain, and not
    > spend
    > the money for a high end (and this is going to be a highend thing.)
    >
    > Thats my few $'s worth.
    > I think that abandoning XP, and TPC edition is a waste. Why not make what
    > you've made better, instead of making a whole new thing.
    >
    > -James
    Chris H., Feb 22, 2005
    #5
  6. flibbertigibbet007 wrote:
    > I read your website, and took your advice, and I too have my taskbar on the
    > left side of the screen. And the start on the left top.
    > I can't cope with the scroll bars on the (perverbial) 'wrong' side of the
    > screen.
    > And in responce to Mike, that was rude. I don't see everyone getting PO'd
    > because of people posting in the wrong section.


    I didn't say that you'd posted in the wrong section. I said that you
    could find more information in this newsgroup's archives. It requires
    little effort for you to search if you're interested. It's rude to
    expect large personalized answers to every post. Left-hand issues are
    definitely in the top ten.

    > And a disapointment in longhorn, as I've heard (I hear lots of rumors), that
    > it's designed for media center specifically?


    Media Center, Tablet PC etc are all "editions" of a core Windows XP. So
    there are add-ons and tune-ins that differ according to the
    hardware/usage profile. That's about as much as can reasonably deduced
    so far. How many editions appear in the future is probably more of a
    marketing/packaging issue - most folks have trouble assimilating the 4
    current editions (Home, Pro, Tablet, MC). My guess is that MS will have
    to start offering retail versions of Tablet edition in future to provide
    an upgrade path for current Tablets. I would also hope that in future
    the differences between Tablet and "regular" versions of Windows will
    simply amount to driver-level support for specific peripherals. If you
    have Tablet hardware, setup would simply enable you to use the digitized
    screen; if not, then you could still view ink and manipulate it in
    simple fashion via keyboard/mouse operations.

    In this case also that it's to
    > make use of the upcomming dual core proc's, which will outdate the tablet PC.
    > And render the lightness and size of tablets useless. As I understand dual
    > core would require bigger heat syncs, better cooling systems, and aren't
    > expected for laptops (or tablets) any time soon.
    > Plus I don't like the concept of needing to buy a new version of windows in
    > 2007. I'm happy with XP TPC with the few exceptions I note once in a while.


    It's not compulsory to upgrade :). But if you want the features in the
    new model of anything, then you have to weigh the pros and cons.

    > But even if I do get longhorn, I don't want to have to buy a new tablet! (not
    > at $2K a machine, and who knows what price it'll be in 2007), sure desktop
    > prices are dropping, but with a dual core, and longhorn, I don't expect
    > longhorn to do that well, people are going to want the bargain, and not spend
    > the money for a high end (and this is going to be a highend thing.)
    >
    > Thats my few $'s worth.
    > I think that abandoning XP, and TPC edition is a waste. Why not make what
    > you've made better, instead of making a whole new thing.


    Many of the limitations in Tablet PC edition are limitations of the
    current Windows architecture (e.g. the left-hand issue). Many folks were
    happy with vinyl records, but unfortunately modifying one to play CDs is
    less productive than building one from scratch.

    Given the work going into building low-cost editions of Windows for
    emerging markets, I'm sure there will be a Longhorn package that will
    run on today's hardware. Microsoft's large corporate/government
    customers are the ones who take the longest to upgrade their hardware
    and they'll want a deployable system on current hardware.
    Mike Williams [MVP], Feb 22, 2005
    #6
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