Store Spare RAM in Anti-Static Bag

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Daddy, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. Daddy

    Daddy Guest

    I just increased the RAM in my Studio XPS 8100 from 4GB to 6GB. No
    problem. I had to replace a pair of 1GB modules with a pair of 2GB
    modules, so now I have two sticks of RAM for which I have no use.

    Maybe I'm superstitious, but I want to hold on to the old memory
    modules, just in case something goes wrong with the new memory. Which
    isn't likely, but anyway...

    The new memory (from Crucial) arrived on a tray sealed inside a plastic
    case. The plastic case got destroyed in the act of opening it. Can I
    store the old RAM inside an anti-static bag?

    Daddy
    Daddy, Jan 31, 2011
    #1
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  2. Daddy

    T i m Guest

    On Sun, 30 Jan 2011 23:59:59 -0500, Daddy <> wrote:

    >The new memory (from Crucial) arrived on a tray sealed inside a plastic
    >case. The plastic case got destroyed in the act of opening it. Can I
    >store the old RAM inside an anti-static bag?
    >

    You can but for RAM you may be safer with a static shielding bag (and
    that may be what you have).

    'Anti static' bags often look like a polythene bag with a tint and
    they are (were) often used for things like floppy drives.

    Static shielding bags are the near black bags you often get RAM, HDD
    and addon cards in and are much safer than the former.

    The bag also needs to be 'closed' (folded over) to provide the full
    protection (I have been handed cards half in / out a static shielding
    bag). ;-(

    Once in the right bag then they can put in a box for physical
    protection.

    For pairs / groups of RAM modules I often put one module in, fold the
    bag over, add another, fold the bag over etc. This keeps the modules
    apart and reduces the risk of any mechanical damage from each other.

    None of this may matter though /if/ you didn't maintain good
    antistatic practice whilst changing the modules (the damage may
    already have been done and may bite you at some time in the future).
    ;-(

    Cheers, T i m
    T i m, Jan 31, 2011
    #2
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  3. Daddy

    Daddy Guest

    T i m wrote:
    > On Sun, 30 Jan 2011 23:59:59 -0500, Daddy <> wrote:
    >
    >> The new memory (from Crucial) arrived on a tray sealed inside a plastic
    >> case. The plastic case got destroyed in the act of opening it. Can I
    >> store the old RAM inside an anti-static bag?
    >>

    > You can but for RAM you may be safer with a static shielding bag (and
    > that may be what you have).
    >
    > 'Anti static' bags often look like a polythene bag with a tint and
    > they are (were) often used for things like floppy drives.
    >
    > Static shielding bags are the near black bags you often get RAM, HDD
    > and addon cards in and are much safer than the former.
    >
    > The bag also needs to be 'closed' (folded over) to provide the full
    > protection (I have been handed cards half in / out a static shielding
    > bag). ;-(
    >
    > Once in the right bag then they can put in a box for physical
    > protection.
    >
    > For pairs / groups of RAM modules I often put one module in, fold the
    > bag over, add another, fold the bag over etc. This keeps the modules
    > apart and reduces the risk of any mechanical damage from each other.
    >
    > None of this may matter though /if/ you didn't maintain good
    > antistatic practice whilst changing the modules (the damage may
    > already have been done and may bite you at some time in the future).
    > ;-(
    >
    > Cheers, T i m


    Thanks for that great advice. I never knew there was a difference
    between an anti-static bag and a static shielding bag. (It turns out I
    have both kinds.)

    Daddy
    Daddy, Jan 31, 2011
    #3
  4. "T i m" wrote:
    > [....]
    > 'Anti static' bags often look like a polythene bag with a tint and
    > they are (were) often used for things like floppy drives.
    >
    > Static shielding bags are the near black bags you often get RAM, HDD
    > and addon cards in and are much safer than the former.


    What's the difference besides the name? Anything called
    "anti-static" would be conductive to prevent static charges
    from collecting on its surface, and anything called "static shielding"
    would also be conductive to prevent static charges from entering
    the bag. I would bet that any plastic bag made of metallized
    mylar sheet (such as what encloses new hard drives) would
    serve well under either nomenclature.

    *TimDaniels*
    Timothy Daniels, Jan 31, 2011
    #4
  5. Daddy

    T i m Guest

    On Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:22:18 -0800, "Timothy Daniels"
    <> wrote:

    >"T i m" wrote:
    >> [....]
    >> 'Anti static' bags often look like a polythene bag with a tint and
    >> they are (were) often used for things like floppy drives.
    >>
    >> Static shielding bags are the near black bags you often get RAM, HDD
    >> and addon cards in and are much safer than the former.

    >
    > What's the difference besides the name?


    A lot.

    > Anything called
    >"anti-static" would be conductive to prevent static charges
    >from collecting on its surface,


    True.

    > and anything called "static shielding"
    >would also be conductive to prevent static charges from entering
    >the bag.


    Again true.

    > I would bet that any plastic bag made of metallized
    >mylar sheet (such as what encloses new hard drives) would
    >serve well under either nomenclature.


    And true again, so that would be 'static shielding'?

    So, we have 'anti-static' materials ... that don't produce and will
    try to distribute any electrostatic charges but /would not/ protect
    any static sensitive materials from an electrostatic discharge as a
    metalised film container might by providing a 'Faraday Cage'.

    I do like (well, I don't) these tips that often come with electronic
    gear where they tell you to 'touch something metal to earth yourself
    before opening ...' but no mention of continuing to do so after that
    initial touch? Not that you should be continually properly 'grounded'
    (ie, zero ohms) whilst working on anything of course.

    Cheers, T i m
    T i m, Jan 31, 2011
    #5
  6. Daddy

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:ii6jpk$f62$-september.org,
    Daddy typed on Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:17:07 -0500:
    > Thanks for that great advice. I never knew there was a difference
    > between an anti-static bag and a static shielding bag. (It turns out I
    > have both kinds.)
    >
    > Daddy


    If no antistatic bags around, tin foil works too.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era)
    Centrino Core2 Duo 1.83G - 2GB - Windows XP SP3
    BillW50, Feb 2, 2011
    #6
  7. Daddy

    T i m Guest

    On Wed, 2 Feb 2011 07:03:56 -0600, "BillW50" <> wrote:

    >In news:ii6jpk$f62$-september.org,
    >Daddy typed on Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:17:07 -0500:
    >> Thanks for that great advice. I never knew there was a difference
    >> between an anti-static bag and a static shielding bag. (It turns out I
    >> have both kinds.)
    >>
    >> Daddy

    >
    >If no antistatic bags around, tin foil works too.


    Back in the day, whilst at BT Factories and during the early use of
    CMOS ICs I saw a load of what looked like new IC's in the skip.

    It turned out they had a delivery of these new fangled 'chips' and the
    storeman sat there painstakingly unwrapping a load from the little
    foil wraps and lobbing the chips in the plastic storage bins before
    someone stopped him ...

    Cheers, T i m
    T i m, Feb 2, 2011
    #7
  8. Daddy

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    T i m typed on Wed, 02 Feb 2011 13:38:59 +0000:
    > On Wed, 2 Feb 2011 07:03:56 -0600, "BillW50" <> wrote:
    >
    >> In news:ii6jpk$f62$-september.org,
    >> Daddy typed on Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:17:07 -0500:
    >>> Thanks for that great advice. I never knew there was a difference
    >>> between an anti-static bag and a static shielding bag. (It turns
    >>> out I have both kinds.)
    >>>
    >>> Daddy

    >>
    >> If no antistatic bags around, tin foil works too.

    >
    > Back in the day, whilst at BT Factories and during the early use of
    > CMOS ICs I saw a load of what looked like new IC's in the skip.
    >
    > It turned out they had a delivery of these new fangled 'chips' and the
    > storeman sat there painstakingly unwrapping a load from the little
    > foil wraps and lobbing the chips in the plastic storage bins before
    > someone stopped him ...
    >
    > Cheers, T i m


    ROTFL! Those old CMOS chips were really sensitive to static too. Back in
    the 80's, I had a keyboard that looked a bit dusty. Pulled out the
    vacuum cleaner and dusted it off. Oops! That blew out the I/O CMOS chip
    in the computer. :-O

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era)
    Centrino Core2 Duo 1.83G - 2GB - Windows XP SP3
    BillW50, Feb 2, 2011
    #8
  9. Daddy

    T i m Guest

    On Wed, 2 Feb 2011 07:52:34 -0600, "BillW50" <> wrote:

    >
    >ROTFL! Those old CMOS chips were really sensitive to static too. Back in
    >the 80's, I had a keyboard that looked a bit dusty. Pulled out the
    >vacuum cleaner and dusted it off. Oops! That blew out the I/O CMOS chip
    >in the computer. :-O


    Ooops indeed.

    Talking of static, I have read suggestion that the wire to 'chip' that
    provides the personality (65W / 90W etc) in these Dell laptop power
    adaptors is effectively an aerial and therefore /could/ introduce some
    high level noise into the chip, killing it?

    Then with the chip dead the laptop stops charging (but will still
    run).

    I mention that because the replacement battery turned up for daughters
    Latitude D520 today and whilst the BIOS / system sees it, (it marks
    the original as 'not present') it still isn't charging it (and it says
    the genuine Dell charger is 'not present')?

    The modular battery still seems to be charging but I'm not sure if
    that is self sufficient (ie, doesn't use the charging circuitry of the
    primary battery).

    Cheers, T i m
    T i m, Feb 2, 2011
    #9
  10. Daddy

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    T i m typed on Wed, 02 Feb 2011 19:25:40 +0000:
    > Talking of static, I have read suggestion that the wire to 'chip' that
    > provides the personality (65W / 90W etc) in these Dell laptop power
    > adaptors is effectively an aerial and therefore /could/ introduce some
    > high level noise into the chip, killing it?
    >
    > Then with the chip dead the laptop stops charging (but will still
    > run).
    >
    > I mention that because the replacement battery turned up for daughters
    > Latitude D520 today and whilst the BIOS / system sees it, (it marks
    > the original as 'not present') it still isn't charging it (and it says
    > the genuine Dell charger is 'not present')?
    >
    > The modular battery still seems to be charging but I'm not sure if
    > that is self sufficient (ie, doesn't use the charging circuitry of the
    > primary battery).


    Yes I could see that wire and acting like an aerial and thus killing the
    chip. And this problem interests me greatly. And does the laptop run
    without any battery installed and run straight off of the AC? I have a
    610 here that won't charge the battery and won't run without the
    battery. And if the battery is drained, the laptop won't fire up at all.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era)
    Centrino Core Duo 1.83G - 2GB - Windows XP SP3
    BillW50, Feb 3, 2011
    #10
  11. Daddy

    T i m Guest

    On Thu, 3 Feb 2011 05:02:12 -0600, "BillW50" <> wrote:

    >In news:,
    >T i m typed on Wed, 02 Feb 2011 19:25:40 +0000:
    >> Talking of static, I have read suggestion that the wire to 'chip' that
    >> provides the personality (65W / 90W etc) in these Dell laptop power
    >> adaptors is effectively an aerial and therefore /could/ introduce some
    >> high level noise into the chip, killing it?
    >>
    >> Then with the chip dead the laptop stops charging (but will still
    >> run).
    >>
    >> I mention that because the replacement battery turned up for daughters
    >> Latitude D520 today and whilst the BIOS / system sees it, (it marks
    >> the original as 'not present') it still isn't charging it (and it says
    >> the genuine Dell charger is 'not present')?
    >>
    >> The modular battery still seems to be charging but I'm not sure if
    >> that is self sufficient (ie, doesn't use the charging circuitry of the
    >> primary battery).

    >
    >Yes I could see that wire and acting like an aerial and thus killing the
    >chip. And this problem interests me greatly. And does the laptop run
    >without any battery installed and run straight off of the AC?


    Yes.

    Both their Latitude D520 and Inspiron 1545s were doing the same
    things. Main batteries flat and not charging but would run directly
    from the adaptors (that were not detected correctly). The only
    difference was on D520 it reported the original primary battery as
    'not present' and the 1545 battery was 'healthy' but 0% charge.

    > I have a
    >610 here that won't charge the battery and won't run without the
    >battery.


    Ah, not seen that one recently (I have seen it before though).

    > And if the battery is drained, the laptop won't fire up at all.


    Hmm.

    Not sure it helps but the new battery on the D520 gave me the
    encouragement to play further and to that end found am old / broken
    90W Dell charger that was dead. However, when I powered it up there
    was a distinct 'click' and a sorta pulsating whining noise that made
    me think it was trying to fire up. Measuring the resistance across the
    DC Plug (so measuring the output resistance of the charger) showed a
    'good' one at about 200 ohms whilst this was scct. I cracked the PSU
    open and long - short, it was the output lead as it exited the brick.
    A quick trim back and re terminated had a charger that was now
    recognised as a '90W adaptor' by the D520 /and/ the 1545. ;-)

    However, leaving the charger on the 1545 only saw a charge increase to
    about 3% after an hour and then the flashing power LED issue returned.

    We then popped into my mates PC shop and with some swapping and trying
    different laptops, batteries and chargers, concluded that his battery
    was shot (another battery and my recovered charger worked / charged
    fine).

    So, we came home with the thought of buying another battery when I
    thought I'd try my Targus charger on it. After about an hour of him
    running the laptop this way he announced that it was showing 14%
    charge! Left charging it now shows 100% and I've even been able to
    update the BIOS from A12 to 14. ;-)

    We managed to pick up a clone Dell charger (that shows as a 150W in
    the BIOS <shrug>) and that also seems to work ok.

    I split both the original chargers open and found both had breaks in
    the data wire at the plug end (unfortunately). I've got some
    replacement leads coming for a fiver each. If they work they should be
    quite cheap for genuine Dell chargers. ;-)

    I found this very informative re how the data side works.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUZ_-4NxtSs&playnext=1&list=PLF659AEFE1F67471C

    http://tinyurl.com/5r8rl79


    I'm tempted (for the s n giggles) putting the 'chip' in an in-line
    adaptor box so that you can see if that's all that's stopping a
    particular charger from doing it's stuff.


    Cheers, T i m
    T i m, Feb 3, 2011
    #11
  12. Daddy

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    T i m typed on Thu, 03 Feb 2011 23:21:38 +0000:
    > On Thu, 3 Feb 2011 05:02:12 -0600, "BillW50" <> wrote:
    >
    >> In news:,
    >> T i m typed on Wed, 02 Feb 2011 19:25:40 +0000:
    >>> Talking of static, I have read suggestion that the wire to 'chip'
    >>> that provides the personality (65W / 90W etc) in these Dell laptop
    >>> power adaptors is effectively an aerial and therefore /could/
    >>> introduce some high level noise into the chip, killing it?
    >>>
    >>> Then with the chip dead the laptop stops charging (but will still
    >>> run).
    >>>
    >>> I mention that because the replacement battery turned up for
    >>> daughters Latitude D520 today and whilst the BIOS / system sees it,
    >>> (it marks the original as 'not present') it still isn't charging it
    >>> (and it says the genuine Dell charger is 'not present')?
    >>>
    >>> The modular battery still seems to be charging but I'm not sure if
    >>> that is self sufficient (ie, doesn't use the charging circuitry of
    >>> the primary battery).

    >>
    >> Yes I could see that wire and acting like an aerial and thus killing
    >> the chip. And this problem interests me greatly. And does the laptop
    >> run without any battery installed and run straight off of the AC?

    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > Both their Latitude D520 and Inspiron 1545s were doing the same
    > things. Main batteries flat and not charging but would run directly
    > from the adaptors (that were not detected correctly). The only
    > difference was on D520 it reported the original primary battery as
    > 'not present' and the 1545 battery was 'healthy' but 0% charge.
    >
    >> I have a 610 here that won't charge the battery and won't run without
    >> the battery.

    >
    > Ah, not seen that one recently (I have seen it before though).
    >
    >> And if the battery is drained, the laptop won't fire up at all.

    >
    > Hmm.
    >
    > Not sure it helps but the new battery on the D520 gave me the
    > encouragement to play further and to that end found am old / broken
    > 90W Dell charger that was dead. However, when I powered it up there
    > was a distinct 'click' and a sorta pulsating whining noise that made
    > me think it was trying to fire up. Measuring the resistance across the
    > DC Plug (so measuring the output resistance of the charger) showed a
    > 'good' one at about 200 ohms whilst this was scct. I cracked the PSU
    > open and long - short, it was the output lead as it exited the brick.
    > A quick trim back and re terminated had a charger that was now
    > recognised as a '90W adaptor' by the D520 /and/ the 1545. ;-)
    >
    > However, leaving the charger on the 1545 only saw a charge increase to
    > about 3% after an hour and then the flashing power LED issue returned.
    >
    > We then popped into my mates PC shop and with some swapping and trying
    > different laptops, batteries and chargers, concluded that his battery
    > was shot (another battery and my recovered charger worked / charged
    > fine).
    >
    > So, we came home with the thought of buying another battery when I
    > thought I'd try my Targus charger on it. After about an hour of him
    > running the laptop this way he announced that it was showing 14%
    > charge! Left charging it now shows 100% and I've even been able to
    > update the BIOS from A12 to 14. ;-)
    >
    > We managed to pick up a clone Dell charger (that shows as a 150W in
    > the BIOS <shrug>) and that also seems to work ok.
    >
    > I split both the original chargers open and found both had breaks in
    > the data wire at the plug end (unfortunately). I've got some
    > replacement leads coming for a fiver each. If they work they should be
    > quite cheap for genuine Dell chargers. ;-)
    >
    > I found this very informative re how the data side works.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUZ_-4NxtSs&playnext=1&list=PLF659AEFE1F67471C
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/5r8rl79
    >
    >
    > I'm tempted (for the s n giggles) putting the 'chip' in an in-line
    > adaptor box so that you can see if that's all that's stopping a
    > particular charger from doing it's stuff.
    >
    >
    > Cheers, T i m


    All very interesting Tim. And I am surprised that nobody seems to talk
    about moving the ROM chip to inside of the computer itself. And
    disconnecting the data wire from the jack. Thus it wouldn't matter if
    the adapter had a working ROM or not.

    I also like your idea of having in-line adapter with a working chip. As
    that would be a great troubleshooting tool for sure.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era)
    Centrino Core Duo 1.83G - 2GB - Windows XP SP3
    BillW50, Feb 6, 2011
    #12
  13. Daddy

    T i m Guest

    On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 06:06:07 -0600, "BillW50" <> wrote:


    >> I'm tempted (for the s n giggles) putting the 'chip' in an in-line
    >> adaptor box so that you can see if that's all that's stopping a
    >> particular charger from doing it's stuff.
    >>

    >
    >All very interesting Tim.


    Well ... ;-)

    >And I am surprised that nobody seems to talk
    >about moving the ROM chip to inside of the computer itself. And
    >disconnecting the data wire from the jack. Thus it wouldn't matter if
    >the adapter had a working ROM or not.


    I've not thought much about the reality of doing so but when I do it
    might be an issue with then it would be always connected and I'm not
    sure that in itself wouldn't be / cause a problem. I guess it would be
    easy to test by disconnecting the +ve lead at the adaptor.
    >
    >I also like your idea of having in-line adapter with a working chip. As
    >that would be a great troubleshooting tool for sure.


    And I think that might be more doable (because of the above).

    I've not yet seen any solid description of the same process at work
    with the batteries though (but believe it may also be present in some
    cases).

    I'd like (partly for the crack) to have a go at re-celling a battery.
    [1] I have a few now that are declared as 'dead' by the host machines
    and older ones that are just very low on capacity. The latter would
    make the best test case as I know any electronics in there work and
    that any increase in capacity would be very noticeable. I'm also aware
    that the economics may not be great in some cases and that it's not
    without some risk.

    Cheers, T i m

    [1] I've re-celled many a RC 'packs' and also the likes of
    rechargeable torches and power tools etc.
    T i m, Feb 6, 2011
    #13
  14. Daddy

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    T i m typed on Sun, 06 Feb 2011 13:59:49 +0000:
    > On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 06:06:07 -0600, "BillW50" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> I'm tempted (for the s n giggles) putting the 'chip' in an in-line
    >>> adaptor box so that you can see if that's all that's stopping a
    >>> particular charger from doing it's stuff.
    >>>

    >>
    >> All very interesting Tim.

    >
    > Well ... ;-)
    >
    >> And I am surprised that nobody seems to talk
    >> about moving the ROM chip to inside of the computer itself. And
    >> disconnecting the data wire from the jack. Thus it wouldn't matter if
    >> the adapter had a working ROM or not.

    >
    > I've not thought much about the reality of doing so but when I do it
    > might be an issue with then it would be always connected and I'm not
    > sure that in itself wouldn't be / cause a problem. I guess it would be
    > easy to test by disconnecting the +ve lead at the adaptor.


    It should act just like having the adapter plugged into the laptop, but
    the AC input disconnected.

    >> I also like your idea of having in-line adapter with a working chip.
    >> As that would be a great troubleshooting tool for sure.

    >
    > And I think that might be more doable (because of the above).
    >
    > I've not yet seen any solid description of the same process at work
    > with the batteries though (but believe it may also be present in some
    > cases).
    >
    > I'd like (partly for the crack) to have a go at re-celling a battery.
    > [1] I have a few now that are declared as 'dead' by the host machines
    > and older ones that are just very low on capacity. The latter would
    > make the best test case as I know any electronics in there work and
    > that any increase in capacity would be very noticeable. I'm also aware
    > that the economics may not be great in some cases and that it's not
    > without some risk.
    >
    > Cheers, T i m
    >
    > [1] I've re-celled many a RC 'packs' and also the likes of
    > rechargeable torches and power tools etc.


    I don't know if you have seen any videos on when things goes wrong with
    lithium batteries, but they can turn into a torch that can cut right
    through steel. This can easily happen if you do either of the following:

    1) Charging them once the cell voltage drops below 2.8v

    2) Overcharging

    3) Short circuiting them

    Laptop manufactures have safe guards to prevent any of the above from
    happening. Although opening up a battery pack, all bets are off. If you
    either accidentally cut into a cell, or short the two terminals
    together... you can have flames shooting out. So I dunno Tim, I don't
    think it is worth it to me.

    And other battery packs can be Ni-Cad and/or Ni-MH cells. Such a mistake
    is far less deadly. As the worse that usually happens with them is that
    they can get really hot during a short circuit. Usually no fire unless
    something nearby can't take the heat.

    So if you still want to take a lithium pack apart, I would do it in a
    lot of ventilation and around nothing that could be burned. And be very,
    very careful! I personally would not recommend it though.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era)
    Centrino Core Duo 1.83G - 2GB - Windows XP SP3
    BillW50, Feb 6, 2011
    #14
  15. Daddy

    T i m Guest

    On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 12:45:44 -0600, "BillW50" <> wrote:


    >> I've not thought much about the reality of doing so but when I do it
    >> might be an issue with then it would be always connected and I'm not
    >> sure that in itself wouldn't be / cause a problem. I guess it would be
    >> easy to test by disconnecting the +ve lead at the adaptor.

    >
    >It should act just like having the adapter plugged into the laptop, but
    >the AC input disconnected.


    Good point.
    >


    >> [1] I've re-celled many a RC 'packs' and also the likes of
    >> rechargeable torches and power tools etc.

    >
    >I don't know if you have seen any videos on when things goes wrong with
    >lithium batteries, but they can turn into a torch that can cut right
    >through steel.


    Cool, might save me some oxyacetylene or angle grinder disks then. ;-)
    (No, I 'get' the warning so thanks).

    >This can easily happen if you do either of the following:
    >
    >1) Charging them once the cell voltage drops below 2.8v


    Is this a function of the charging current do you know? I ask because
    I know these things are being used in EVs etc where I could imagine
    the currents could get quite high?
    >
    >2) Overcharging


    Understood.
    >
    >3) Short circuiting them


    Yup.
    >
    >Laptop manufactures have safe guards to prevent any of the above from
    >happening. Although opening up a battery pack, all bets are off.


    Of course.

    > If you
    >either accidentally cut into a cell, or short the two terminals
    >together... you can have flames shooting out.


    Oooerr.

    > So I dunno Tim, I don't
    >think it is worth it to me.


    Whilst I agree I'm assuming someone must have assembled them
    somewhere? Plus as a Motorcyclist and a user of some nasty power tools
    that I believe could be equally dangerous I think understanding and
    managing risk are just part of the task. That said I may not bother
    .... ;-)

    FWIW I have (also) seen a fair few videos of people successfully
    re-celling laptop and other packs and I believe at least some of them
    were Lithium?

    I guess it might be the same thoughts as when daughter told us she
    wanted a chainsaw for Xmas (and got one). ;-)
    >
    >And other battery packs can be Ni-Cad and/or Ni-MH cells. Such a mistake
    >is far less deadly. As the worse that usually happens with them is that
    >they can get really hot during a short circuit. Usually no fire unless
    >something nearby can't take the heat.


    I have seen a few Nicads going up (low tech un-timed resistor
    chargers) and saw an RC car nearly catch fire when the battery lead
    disconnected mid race.
    >
    >So if you still want to take a lithium pack apart, I would do it in a
    >lot of ventilation and around nothing that could be burned. And be very,
    >very careful! I personally would not recommend it though.


    Understood and your consideration is duly noted and appreciated. ;-)

    Cheers, T i m

    p.s. If you drop an air-bomb in and old PC case ...
    T i m, Feb 6, 2011
    #15
  16. Daddy

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:,
    T i m typed on Sun, 06 Feb 2011 21:00:20 +0000:
    > On Sun, 6 Feb 2011 12:45:44 -0600, "BillW50" <> wrote:

    [...]
    >> This can easily happen if you do either of the following:
    >>
    >> 1) Charging them once the cell voltage drops below 2.8v

    >
    > Is this a function of the charging current do you know? I ask because
    > I know these things are being used in EVs etc where I could imagine
    > the currents could get quite high?


    No! The way I understand this, it is due to chemistry. Once it hits this
    point, as charging cannot chemically reverse it anymore. And trying to
    do so can cause the cells to shoot out flames like a torch.

    [...]

    >> So I dunno Tim, I don't think it is worth it to me.

    >
    > Whilst I agree I'm assuming someone must have assembled them
    > somewhere? Plus as a Motorcyclist and a user of some nasty power tools
    > that I believe could be equally dangerous I think understanding and
    > managing risk are just part of the task. That said I may not bother
    > ... ;-)


    I too am a motorcyclist. ;-)

    > FWIW I have (also) seen a fair few videos of people successfully
    > re-celling laptop and other packs and I believe at least some of them
    > were Lithium?


    Yes it can be done. Although lots of precautions and care should be
    employed. Although I would imagine some people just get lucky.

    > I guess it might be the same thoughts as when daughter told us she
    > wanted a chainsaw for Xmas (and got one). ;-)


    Wow!

    >> And other battery packs can be Ni-Cad and/or Ni-MH cells. Such a
    >> mistake is far less deadly. As the worse that usually happens with
    >> them is that they can get really hot during a short circuit. Usually
    >> no fire unless something nearby can't take the heat.

    >
    > I have seen a few Nicads going up (low tech un-timed resistor
    > chargers) and saw an RC car nearly catch fire when the battery lead
    > disconnected mid race.


    Fascinating.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era)
    Centrino Core Duo 1.83G - 2GB - Windows XP SP3
    BillW50, Feb 10, 2011
    #16
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