1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

Sun Blade 2500 use of USB hard drive

Discussion in 'Sun Hardware' started by pne.chomko@comcast.net, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. Guest

    I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    as an NTSF file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    10. A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.

    Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized? I ask because an 8 GB flash
    drive works just fine.

    Any help with this is appreciated.

    Eric
    , Dec 18, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Huge Guest

    On 2008-12-18, <> wrote:
    > I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    > as an NTSF


    I assume you mean NTFS.

    > file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    > 10. A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    > and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    > a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    > appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.
    >
    > Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized?


    AFAIK, Solaris cannot read NTFS.

    Also, the USB is only V1, so it will be very slow, even if it worked.


    --
    I can't sing, I ain't good looking and my legs are thin.
    [email me at huge {at} huge (dot) org <dot> uk]
    Huge, Dec 19, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. writes:

    >I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    >as an NTSF file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    >10. A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    >and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    >a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    >appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.


    >Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized? I ask because an 8 GB flash
    >drive works just fine.


    There's no support for NTFS in Solaris.

    You could reformat it as a FAT32 on non Windows.

    Casper
    --
    Expressed in this posting are my opinions. They are in no way related
    to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
    Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
    be fiction rather than truth.
    Casper H.S. Dik, Dec 19, 2008
    #3
  4. Guest

    On Dec 19, 3:33 am, Huge <> wrote:
    > On 2008-12-18, <> wrote:
    >
    > > I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    > > as an NTSF

    >
    > I assume you mean NTFS.


    Yes

    >
    > > file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    > > 10.  A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    > > and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    > > a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    > > appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.

    >
    > > Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized?

    >
    > AFAIK, Solaris cannot read NTFS.
    >
    > Also, the USB is only V1, so it will be very slow, even if it worked.


    Not on a Sun Blade 2500. See:
    http://www.sun.com/desktop/workstation/sunblade2500/specs.xml

    Eric
    , Dec 19, 2008
    #4
  5. Hi,

    Huge wrote:
    > On 2008-12-18, <> wrote:
    >> I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    >> as an NTSF

    >
    > I assume you mean NTFS.
    >
    >> file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    >> 10. A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    >> and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    >> a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    >> appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.
    >>
    >> Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized?

    >
    > AFAIK, Solaris cannot read NTFS.
    >
    > Also, the USB is only V1, so it will be very slow, even if it worked.
    >
    >

    Only the motherboards USB is V1(for keyboard mouse), a V2 is in a PCI slot.

    /michael
    Michael Laajanen, Dec 19, 2008
    #5
  6. Guest

    On Dec 19, 11:41 am, erik magnuson <> wrote:
    > Huge wrote:
    > > On 2008-12-18, <> wrote:

    >
    > >>I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    > >>as an NTSF

    >
    > > I assume you mean NTFS.

    >
    > >>file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    > >>10.  A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    > >>and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    > >>a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    > >>appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.

    >
    > >>Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized?

    >
    > > AFAIK, Solaris cannot read NTFS.

    >
    > > Also, the USB is only V1, so it will be very slow, even if it worked.

    >
    > The OP has a Sun Blade *2500*, not a *2000*. The 1500 and 2500 both have
    >   USB V2 (this is being typed on a 1500).


    Actually I DO own a Sun Blade 2000 and use a Sun Blade 2500 at work.
    But that doesn't change your point that both support USB 2.0

    Eric
    , Dec 20, 2008
    #6
  7. Guest

    On Dec 19, 9:13 am, Casper H.S. Dik <> wrote:
    > writes:
    > >I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    > >as an NTSF file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    > >10.  A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    > >and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    > >a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    > >appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.
    > >Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized? I ask because an 8 GB flash
    > >drive works just fine.

    >
    > There's no support for NTFS in Solaris.
    >
    > You could reformat it as a FAT32 on non Windows.


    There is a 2 GB file size limit with FAT32, correct? Some of my files
    are bigger than 2 GB. But, if I must operate with FAT32 and use less
    that 2 GB files, then I must. I'll have to present my situation that
    way.

    Can I reformat an NTFS USB hard drive to UFS to make it Solaris
    compatible?

    As a Sun employee, may I ask you what is the best way for me to obtain
    a SPARC laptop (mobile unit), given that Sun no longer makes them?

    I really appreciate the help.

    Thanks,
    Eric

    >
    > Casper
    > --
    > Expressed in this posting are my opinions.  They are in no way related
    > to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
    > Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
    > be fiction rather than truth.
    , Dec 20, 2008
    #7
  8. DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-12-19, Huge <> wrote:
    > On 2008-12-18, <> wrote:
    >> I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    >> as an NTSF

    >
    > I assume you mean NTFS.
    >
    >> file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    >> 10. A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    >> and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    >> a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    >> appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.
    >>
    >> Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized?

    >
    > AFAIK, Solaris cannot read NTFS.


    Unless someone is writing it into OpenSolaris as we type. :)
    But I think that NTFS is still proprietary enough so others can't get
    the information to write drivers for it on non-Windows systems.

    OpenBSD (and some linux system) have the ability to *read* NTFS,
    *if* you edit the kernel configuration file and re-compile the kernel.
    This is apparently from reverse-engineering NTFS. But they *can't* make
    it so it can *write* to NTFS without crashing the filesystem or the OS.
    And apparently there is a new variety of NTFS which can't even be read by
    these systems.

    If they *did* get full compatibility, you *know* that Microsoft
    would "enhance" the filesystem to render it incompatible again. :)

    If you are going to use it only on the Solaris system, can it
    format the drive as a UFS (unix file system) instead -- which would be a
    much better match to the OS anyway. Just because the drive may
    currently be formatted as NTFS does not mean that it must always be so
    formatted. (Of course, if you want to access data which is already on
    it, you don't want to format it at all. :)

    > Also, the USB is only V1, so it will be very slow, even if it worked.


    I know this to be the situation on my SB-2K and the SB-1K which
    preceded it, but it is possible to add a PCI board which will handle UFS
    2.0, so the speed can be dealt with at least.

    I don't know about the SB-2500, but my SB-1K and SB-2K also have
    a firewire port, which is much faster than USB 1.1 anyway. I've never
    tried stuffing a drive into that port, so I don't know what filesystems
    it supports. My only Firewire capable drive housing is currently
    supporting it on a Mac Mini, where things like a nice fast UltraSCSI or
    Fibre Channel are not present.

    O.K. I just looked up the SB-2500 in the FEH, and find (among
    other things):

    ======================================================================
    IEEE 1394 2 ports, provided by a plug in PCI card (I/O Combo Card)
    Keyboard and mouse USB (works only with onboard USB 1.1 ports)
    SCSI One Ultra160 SCSI multimode (SE/LVD)
    USB USB 1.1: 4 ports (back)
    USB 2.0: 3 ports, provided by a plug in PCI card (I/O Combo Card)
    ======================================================================

    So -- it looks as though you have USB 2.0 and Firewire (IEEE 1394)
    if you have the I/O combo card, which sounds like it is a standard part
    of the system. Yes -- it says that it is:

    "factory installed in PCI slot 0"

    for both the SB-1500 and SB-2500.

    I wonder whether it would work in a SB-2K? :)

    And you *don't* have the Fibre Channel at all -- unless you get
    an extra PCI card for the purpose.

    Enjoy,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Dec 20, 2008
    #8
  9. Guest

    On Dec 19, 10:52 pm, "DoN. Nichols" <> wrote:
    > On 2008-12-19, Huge <> wrote:
    >
    > > On 2008-12-18, <> wrote:
    > >> I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    > >> as an NTSF

    >
    > > I assume you mean NTFS.

    >
    > >> file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    > >> 10.  A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    > >> and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    > >> a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    > >> appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.

    >
    > >> Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized?

    >
    > > AFAIK, Solaris cannot read NTFS.

    >
    >         Unless someone is writing it into OpenSolaris as we type.:)
    > But I think that NTFS is still proprietary enough so others can't get
    > the information to write drivers for it on non-Windows systems.
    >
    >         OpenBSD (and some linux system) have the ability to *read* NTFS,
    > *if* you edit the kernel configuration file and re-compile the kernel.
    > This is apparently from reverse-engineering NTFS.  But they *can't* make
    > it so it can *write* to NTFS without crashing the filesystem or the OS.
    > And apparently there is a new variety of NTFS which can't even be read by
    > these systems.
    >
    >         If they *did* get full compatibility, you *know* that Microsoft
    > would "enhance" the filesystem to render it incompatible again. :)
    >
    >         If you are going to use it only on the Solaris system, can it
    > format the drive as a UFS (unix file system) instead -- which would be a
    > much better match to the OS anyway.  


    My thoughts as well as I suspect that UFS code access would work with
    little
    or no changes. That is where my group is headed.

    > Just because the drive may
    > currently be formatted as NTFS does not mean that it must always be so
    > formatted.  (Of course, if you want to access data which is already on
    > it, you don't want to format it at all. :)


    No, I have a clean NTFS 1 TB USB drive that I am willing to reformat
    for my purposes.

    >
    > > Also, the USB is only V1, so it will be very slow, even if it worked.

    >
    >         I know this to be the situation on my SB-2K and the SB-1Kwhich
    > preceded it, but it is possible to add a PCI board which will handle UFS
    > 2.0, so the speed can be dealt with at least.


    The Sun website doesn't make it clear, but you'd figure if it did have
    USB 2.0 it would say so.
    http://www.sun.com/desktop/workstation/sunblade2000/specs.xml

    >
    >         I don't know about the SB-2500, but my SB-1K and SB-2K also have
    > a firewire port, which is much faster than USB 1.1 anyway.  I've never
    > tried stuffing a drive into that port, so I don't know what filesystems
    > it supports.  My only Firewire capable drive housing is currently
    > supporting it on a Mac Mini, where things like a nice fast UltraSCSI or
    > Fibre Channel are not present.
    >
    >         O.K.  I just looked up the SB-2500 in the FEH, and find(among
    > other things):
    >
    >  ======================================================================
    > IEEE 1394               2 ports, provided by a plug in PCI card (I/O Combo Card)
    > Keyboard and mouse      USB (works only with onboard USB 1.1 ports)
    > SCSI                    One Ultra160 SCSI multimode (SE/LVD)
    > USB                     USB 1.1: 4 ports (back)
    >                         USB 2.0: 3 ports, provided by a plug in PCI card (I/O Combo Card)
    >  ======================================================================
    >
    >         So -- it looks as though you have USB 2.0 and Firewire (IEEE 1394)
    > if you have the I/O combo card, which sounds like it is a standard part
    > of the system.  Yes -- it says that it is:
    >
    >         "factory installed in PCI slot 0"
    >
    > for both the SB-1500 and SB-2500.
    >
    >         I wonder whether it would work in a SB-2K? :)
    >
    >         And you *don't* have the Fibre Channel at all -- unless you get
    > an extra PCI card for the purpose.
    >


    I may have to see what the USB PCI card does on the Sun Blade 2500 at
    work. I am les concerned with my SB 2000 at home as I mostly do
    development and provide myself with a code backup to my work Sun Blade
    2500 system.

    Anyone got a Sun SPARC laptop they want to sell?

    Eric
    , Dec 20, 2008
    #9
  10. Huge Guest

    On 2008-12-19, erik magnuson <> wrote:
    > Huge wrote:
    >> On 2008-12-18, <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    >>>as an NTSF

    >>
    >>
    >> I assume you mean NTFS.
    >>
    >>
    >>>file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    >>>10. A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    >>>and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    >>>a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    >>>appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.
    >>>
    >>>Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized?

    >>
    >>
    >> AFAIK, Solaris cannot read NTFS.
    >>
    >> Also, the USB is only V1, so it will be very slow, even if it worked.
    >>

    >
    > The OP has a Sun Blade *2500*, not a *2000*. The 1500 and 2500 both have
    > USB V2 (this is being typed on a 1500).


    Ahh, thank you. The speed of the keyboard exceeds that of the brain.

    --
    I'll rip the skin from God's face
    [email me at huge {at} huge (dot) org <dot> uk]
    Huge, Dec 20, 2008
    #10
  11. writes:

    >There is a 2 GB file size limit with FAT32, correct? Some of my files
    >are bigger than 2 GB. But, if I must operate with FAT32 and use less
    >that 2 GB files, then I must. I'll have to present my situation that
    >way.


    No, there isn't. Any camera will use FAT/FAT32 and you can easily get a
    64GB CF card. But Windows may not allow you to create such a large
    FAT32 system. Solaris could, but FAT32 support is slow.

    >Can I reformat an NTFS USB hard drive to UFS to make it Solaris
    >compatible?


    Yes, or use ZFS. (Which will work on SPARC and x86; UFS only works
    the type of system which created it)

    >As a Sun employee, may I ask you what is the best way for me to obtain
    >a SPARC laptop (mobile unit), given that Sun no longer makes them?


    We never made them (except the Voyager); Tadpole?

    Casper
    --
    Expressed in this posting are my opinions. They are in no way related
    to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
    Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
    be fiction rather than truth.
    Casper H.S. Dik, Dec 20, 2008
    #11
  12. * Casper H.S. Dik:

    >> There is a 2 GB file size limit with FAT32, correct? Some of my files
    >> are bigger than 2 GB. But, if I must operate with FAT32 and use less
    >> that 2 GB files, then I must. I'll have to present my situation that
    >> way.

    >
    > No, there isn't.


    Well, there is. FAT32 is limited to a file size of 4GB. It's a file
    system limit (32bit limitation) and thus not limited to Windows.

    Windows itself refuses to format partitions greater 32GB with FAT32 but
    this can be circumvented by one of the available tools or formatting on
    a non-Windows system (Mac, Solaris, Linux, whatever).

    Benjamin
    Benjamin Gawert, Dec 20, 2008
    #12
  13. Benjamin Gawert <> writes:

    >* Casper H.S. Dik:


    >>> There is a 2 GB file size limit with FAT32, correct? Some of my files
    >>> are bigger than 2 GB. But, if I must operate with FAT32 and use less
    >>> that 2 GB files, then I must. I'll have to present my situation that
    >>> way.

    >>
    >> No, there isn't.


    >Well, there is. FAT32 is limited to a file size of 4GB. It's a file
    >system limit (32bit limitation) and thus not limited to Windows.


    Yeah, you're right; I was looking at the "size of a filesystem". Not
    the size of a file.

    Casper
    --
    Expressed in this posting are my opinions. They are in no way related
    to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
    Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
    be fiction rather than truth.
    Casper H.S. Dik, Dec 20, 2008
    #13
  14. DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-12-20, Casper H.S Dik <> wrote:
    > writes:


    [ ... ]

    >>As a Sun employee, may I ask you what is the best way for me to obtain
    >>a SPARC laptop (mobile unit), given that Sun no longer makes them?

    >
    > We never made them (except the Voyager); Tadpole?


    Out of curiosity -- what was the largest plug-in disk for those?
    I picked up one at a hamfest, and while it works, the disk is way too
    small, and running from battery it almost finishes booting Solaris 2.6
    before it runs out of charge. :)

    Was there ever anything larger made for it? If so, I might work
    at getting better batteries into it and try using it a bit.

    Thanks,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Dec 21, 2008
    #14
  15. Dave Guest

    wrote:

    > Actually I DO own a Sun Blade 2000 and use a Sun Blade 2500 at work.
    > But that doesn't change your point that both support USB 2.0
    >
    > Eric



    The Sun Blade 2000 does NOT support USB 2.0 on the USB sockets provided.
    If you want USB 2.0 on a Blade 2000, you need to buy a PCI card, which
    is what I've done on my Blade 2000.

    I can't speak for the Blade 2500 - that is another machine, which I know
    very little about.

    There was a talk recently at the London OpenSolaris User Group (LOSUG)
    about FUSE, which is a framework for writing filesystem drivers in
    userland. You might want to look at FUSE. I got the impression an NTFS
    driver was either under development, or did exist.

    Here's one link - Google will find you others

    http://opensolaris.org/os/project/fuse/
    Dave, Dec 21, 2008
    #15
  16. "DoN. Nichols" <> writes:

    >On 2008-12-20, Casper H.S Dik <> wrote:
    >> writes:


    > [ ... ]


    >>>As a Sun employee, may I ask you what is the best way for me to obtain
    >>>a SPARC laptop (mobile unit), given that Sun no longer makes them?

    >>
    >> We never made them (except the Voyager); Tadpole?


    > Out of curiosity -- what was the largest plug-in disk for those?
    >I picked up one at a hamfest, and while it works, the disk is way too
    >small, and running from battery it almost finishes booting Solaris 2.6
    >before it runs out of charge. :)


    What I can find in the handbook says "810MB"; it's a strange form factor:
    2 1/4". SCSI

    Casper
    --
    Expressed in this posting are my opinions. They are in no way related
    to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
    Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
    be fiction rather than truth.
    Casper H.S. Dik, Dec 22, 2008
    #16
  17. Guest

    On Dec 19, 9:13 am, Casper H.S. Dik <> wrote:
    > writes:
    > >I'm trying to hook up a 1 terabyte USB hard drive, which is fornatted
    > >as an NTSF file system, to a Sun Blade 2500 system, running Solaris
    > >10.  A pop-up window appears stating 'PCFS' as some sort of choice,
    > >and that it is trying to havre the user select a low-level (quick) or
    > >a regular long format. I can't change the 'PCFS' to 'NTFS' and it
    > >appears that the NTFS hard drive is otherwise not being recognized.
    > >Can only FAT32 and not NTFS be recognized? I ask because an 8 GB flash
    > >drive works just fine.

    >
    > There's no support for NTFS in Solaris.
    >
    > You could reformat it as a FAT32 on non Windows.


    I routinely work with files over 2GB. FAT32 has a 2 GB file limit like
    Sun used to have back in the 1990s. I was using SGIs at that time for
    that very reason. I was using 5 and 6 GB files and SGI's xfs handled
    them just fine. Sun finally caught up to that.

    Eric

    >
    > Casper
    > --
    > Expressed in this posting are my opinions.  They are in no way related
    > to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
    > Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
    > be fiction rather than truth.
    , Dec 22, 2008
    #17
  18. Guest

    On Dec 20, 8:23 am, Casper H.S. Dik <> wrote:
    > writes:
    > >There is a 2 GB file size limit with FAT32, correct? Some of my files
    > >are bigger than 2 GB. But, if I must operate with FAT32 and use less
    > >that 2 GB files, then I must. I'll have to present my situation that
    > >way.

    >
    > No, there isn't.  Any camera will use FAT/FAT32 and you can easily get a
    > 64GB CF card.  But Windows may not allow you to create such a large
    > FAT32 system.  Solaris could, but FAT32 support is slow.


    The point of using FAT32 or NTFS is to allow the same hard drive get
    access by two different OS's. I know that FAT32 has a 2GB file limit
    whther it is Windows of the FS. The point is that I can't save a 4GB
    file onto a hard drive and have Windows read it. THAT is a 2 GB file
    limit!

    >
    > >Can I reformat an NTFS USB hard drive to UFS to make it Solaris
    > >compatible?

    >
    > Yes, or use ZFS.  (Which will work on SPARC and x86; UFS only works
    > the type of system which created it)
    >


    I'll check into ZFS.

    > >As a Sun employee, may I ask you what is the best way for me to obtain
    > >a SPARC laptop (mobile unit), given that Sun no longer makes them?

    >
    > We never made them (except the Voyager); Tadpole?


    I was speaking about the mobile 3 systems.
    http://sunsolve.sun.com/handbook_pub/validateUser.do?target=Systems/Ultra3/Ultra3

    Since Sun doesn't make them anymore I don't think people care too much
    that Sun doesn't like the term 'laptop' and prefers 'mobile' instead.
    , Dec 22, 2008
    #18
  19. Guest

    On Dec 20, 9:05 pm, erik magnuson <> wrote:
    > Benjamin Gawert wrote:
    > > * Casper H.S. Dik:

    >
    > >>> There is a 2 GB file size limit with FAT32, correct? Some of my files
    > >>> are bigger than 2 GB. But, if I must operate with FAT32 and use less
    > >>> that 2 GB files, then I must. I'll have to present my situation that
    > >>> way.

    >
    > >> No, there isn't.  

    >
    > > Well, there is. FAT32 is limited to a file size of 4GB. It's a file
    > > system limit (32bit limitation) and thus not limited to Windows.

    >
    > The 4GB filesize limit for FAT filesystems dates back to 1980 when Tim
    > Paterson was implementing the FAT filesystem for QDOS/86-DOS. Since the
    > original version of FAT only had 12 bits for the allocation entries, a
    > 4GB disk would have required 1 MB clusters... Keep in mind that QDOS was
    > written specifically to allow easy porting of CP/M-80 programs to QDOS -
    > 86-DOS shipped with utilities to read CP/M floppies and had a program to
    > do most of the work translating Z-80 ASM to the 8086 assembler shipped
    > with 86-DOS.
    >
    > The QDOS/86-DOS INT-21H API was written to be agnostic towards the
    > number of bits in the allocation table, so a properly wriiten program
    > from 1980 should have no problem handling a 4GB file (w-e-l-l-l).


    What about a 6 GB or 24 GB file?

    Eric

    >
    > - Erik
    , Dec 22, 2008
    #19
  20. DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-12-22, Casper H.S Dik <> wrote:
    > "DoN. Nichols" <> writes:
    >
    >>On 2008-12-20, Casper H.S Dik <> wrote:


    [ ... ]

    >>> We never made them (except the Voyager); Tadpole?

    >
    >> Out of curiosity -- what was the largest plug-in disk for those?
    >>I picked up one at a hamfest, and while it works, the disk is way too
    >>small, and running from battery it almost finishes booting Solaris 2.6
    >>before it runs out of charge. :)

    >
    > What I can find in the handbook says "810MB"; it's a strange form factor:
    > 2 1/4". SCSI


    Hmm ... I think that mine actually has a somewhat larger drive,
    but not nearly enough larger. :) It's not bad with a large enough drive
    hung on the external SCSI (once I found an adaptor from the weird
    connector, which appears to be the same as was used on some earlier
    pre-unix-based Macs). I got some cables from MicroCenter just in time,
    they were closing them out.

    I did some web searches for drives which would fit within the
    existing plug-in housing and would offer sufficient disk space, and
    eventually found one maker who had a built-in bridge from IDE to SCSI,
    but the price, while perhaps reasonable if I had paid the full list
    price for the computer, was not at all reasonable for a computer which I
    picked up for something like $35.00 at a hamfest. -- so I dropped the
    idea.

    Thanks,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Dec 23, 2008
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Nikolaj Johansen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    797
    Nikolaj Johansen
    Dec 12, 2003
  2. Martin Bochnig
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    896
    Tim Bradshaw
    May 31, 2005
  3. ohaya
    Replies:
    26
    Views:
    1,253
    ohaya
    Mar 27, 2006
  4. Dave

    Re: Hard drives for Sun Blade 2500

    Dave, Jul 12, 2009, in forum: Sun Hardware
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    629
  5. Michael Laajanen

    Re: Hard drives for Sun Blade 2500

    Michael Laajanen, Jul 12, 2009, in forum: Sun Hardware
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,264
    Andreas Wacknitz
    Jul 12, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page