1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

Sun Ultra 40 M2 hard drive sleds

Discussion in 'Sun Hardware' started by Benjamin Gawert, Sep 17, 2008.

  1. Are the SATA/SAS hard drive sleds in a Sun Ultra 40 M2 the same as the
    ones used in the old Enterprise Servers (i.e. E250, E450), the Ultra 60,
    and the Sun Blade 1000? I want to know if I can "recycle" old sleds for
    use in a Ultra 40 M2.

    Benjamin
    Benjamin Gawert, Sep 17, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Benjamin Gawert

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-09-17, Benjamin Gawert <> wrote:
    > Are the SATA/SAS hard drive sleds in a Sun Ultra 40 M2 the same as the
    > ones used in the old Enterprise Servers (i.e. E250, E450), the Ultra 60,
    > and the Sun Blade 1000? I want to know if I can "recycle" old sleds for
    > use in a Ultra 40 M2.


    Hmm ... I've never seen the Ultra-40 (nor the E250 and E450,
    FWIW), but the disk drive holders for the Ultra 60 and the Sun Blade
    1000 (and 2000) are called "spuds" not "sleds" (and don't look enough
    like what I would accept as "sleds" anyway, like the ones for the EMC
    Fiber Channel rack trays.)

    Now -- some drives will have a separate plate screwed onto the
    bottom to control airflow for proper cooling. In the Ultra-60, and the
    Sun Blade [12]000 these are fine. In a Multipack (which accepts the
    same spuds) they are deadly for a drive in the bottom slot on each side,
    as they get hung on the bottom plastic trim of the chassis. (You can get
    away with them in other slots, but it is safer to not use them at all,
    as there is a risk of someone in a hurry sticking one in the bottom
    slot, where it will be until you can devote a lot of attention to
    getting the drive back out. :)

    The simple thing to do is to try it. Will the drive slide in,
    and will the connector line up and mate? If they will, you have the
    answer to your question.

    The Ultra-40 is also a bit too new to be covered by my Sun FEH
    (Field Engineer's handbook), which could otherwise answer some of the
    questions.

    Good Luck,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Sep 18, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. * DoN. Nichols:

    > Hmm ... I've never seen the Ultra-40 (nor the E250 and E450,
    > FWIW), but the disk drive holders for the Ultra 60 and the Sun Blade
    > 1000 (and 2000) are called "spuds" not "sleds"


    I more often see the term "sled" reffering to them, and I am sure people
    understand what I mean.

    The sleds/spuds are all the same for internal SCSI/FC hard drives in the
    old UltraSPARC workstations and servers, bei it Ultra 2, Ultra 60, Ultra
    80, SB 1000, SB2000, E250, E450, E3000, E3500 etc.


    > Now -- some drives will have a separate plate screwed onto the
    > bottom to control airflow for proper cooling. In the Ultra-60, and the
    > Sun Blade [12]000 these are fine. In a Multipack (which accepts the
    > same spuds) they are deadly for a drive in the bottom slot on each side,
    > as they get hung on the bottom plastic trim of the chassis. (You can get
    > away with them in other slots, but it is safer to not use them at all,
    > as there is a risk of someone in a hurry sticking one in the bottom
    > slot, where it will be until you can devote a lot of attention to
    > getting the drive back out. :)


    I never used any of these cooling plates in any of my Suns, no problems
    so far. They can't help cooling the drive anyways, all they can do is
    prevent heat from another lower drive heating up the electronics.

    > The simple thing to do is to try it. Will the drive slide in,
    > and will the connector line up and mate? If they will, you have the
    > answer to your question.


    Which is definitely what I had done if I had a Ultra 40 M2. However, at
    the moment I don't. I'm thinking of ordering one but besides other
    factors it depends on if I can use these hard disk plastic thingies in
    the Ultra 40 or if I had to buy new ones (which then probably are hard
    to come by without hard drives). On the images I've seen they look the
    same, however I'd prefer if someone with an Ultra 40 could very that for me.

    Benjamin

    > The Ultra-40 is also a bit too new to be covered by my Sun FEH
    > (Field Engineer's handbook), which could otherwise answer some of the
    > questions.
    >
    > Good Luck,
    > DoN.
    >
    Benjamin Gawert, Sep 18, 2008
    #3
  4. * Trinean:

    > The SPUD Brackets are physically the same.


    Thanks for the info! I already suspected that by looking at pictures of
    both brackets, but it could have been that there are small differences
    which are not noticeable by looking on pictures. Thanks for clarification!

    > The part number for the drive written on the bracket will differ if you
    > reuse them for other systems.
    > The Ultra 40 doesn't need the heat plate like some systems have on the
    > bottom of the disks.


    I doubt that any hard drives made in the last 8+ years or so do really
    put up enough heat to require a heat plate to prevent the heat from
    melting other drives' electronics.

    Benjamin
    Benjamin Gawert, Sep 18, 2008
    #4
  5. Benjamin Gawert

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-09-18, Benjamin Gawert <> wrote:
    > * DoN. Nichols:
    >
    >> Hmm ... I've never seen the Ultra-40 (nor the E250 and E450,
    >> FWIW), but the disk drive holders for the Ultra 60 and the Sun Blade
    >> 1000 (and 2000) are called "spuds" not "sleds"

    >
    > I more often see the term "sled" reffering to them, and I am sure people
    > understand what I mean.
    >
    > The sleds/spuds are all the same for internal SCSI/FC hard drives in the
    > old UltraSPARC workstations and servers, bei it Ultra 2, Ultra 60, Ultra
    > 80, SB 1000, SB2000, E250, E450, E3000, E3500 etc.


    Also the Sun Fire 280R (which is really a SB-2000 in rack-mount
    format, with the drives moved to the front panel for hot swap, and
    dual hot-swap power supplies.

    >> Now -- some drives will have a separate plate screwed onto the
    >> bottom to control airflow for proper cooling.


    [ ... ]

    > I never used any of these cooling plates in any of my Suns, no problems
    > so far. They can't help cooling the drive anyways, all they can do is
    > prevent heat from another lower drive heating up the electronics.


    The ones with louvers angled oppositely at either end will also
    redirect airflow (assuming that it is flowing from connector to spud
    lever end) so it flows over the chips to keep it a bit cooler. However,
    if the airflow is from side to side, that particular style would not do
    anything useful.

    The other style, with fingers at the sides, will probably only
    do some radiated heat control, and perhaps reduce turbulence with air
    flowing from side to side.

    The MultiPack has the airflow along the drive's length.

    The SB-[12]000 has it side to side. (I think that the Ultra-60
    does as well, but I would have to go dig one up to check for sure.

    The Ultra-2 is back-to-front, I think.

    So is the Sun Fire 280R.

    And the A-1000 RAID box and the D-1000 JBOD (same box, different
    logic card).

    >> The simple thing to do is to try it. Will the drive slide in,
    >> and will the connector line up and mate? If they will, you have the
    >> answer to your question.

    >
    > Which is definitely what I had done if I had a Ultra 40 M2. However, at
    > the moment I don't. I'm thinking of ordering one but besides other
    > factors it depends on if I can use these hard disk plastic thingies


    You have the ones which are all plastic -- or the ones with the
    metal extraction lever in front? I far prefer the latter.

    > in
    > the Ultra 40 or if I had to buy new ones (which then probably are hard
    > to come by without hard drives).


    You could always find out what Sun charges for them. :) I think
    that there is a separate barcode number for a bare spud, as well as one
    for spuds with specific drives pre-installed.

    > On the images I've seen they look the
    > same, however I'd prefer if someone with an Ultra 40 could very that for me.


    Well ... I can't do that I'm afraid. My newest machines are
    SB-2000, with SB-1000 and Sun Fire 280R coming close to that. :)

    Note that my FEH covers the SB-1000, but not the SB-2000 or the
    Sun Fire 280R. (The FEH has a 2000 date, and the badge on the SB-2000
    say "2002" and "Twenty years of innovation". :)

    Good Luck,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Sep 18, 2008
    #5
  6. Benjamin Gawert

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-09-18, Trinean <> wrote:

    [ ... ]

    > The SPUD Brackets are physically the same.
    > The part number for the drive written on the bracket will differ if you
    > reuse them for other systems.


    Good! That solves the OP's problem

    > The Ultra 40 doesn't need the heat plate like some systems have on the
    > bottom of the disks.


    Just out of curiosity -- which systems *do* need them? I've
    found them on drives in Ultra-2, and in a SB-2000, as well as some
    drives which I believe were in a A-1000 prior to them being offered by a
    local used computer store. :) But I don't think that I've ever found a
    situation where they were *needed*.

    Thanks,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Sep 18, 2008
    #6
  7. * DoN. Nichols:
    > You have the ones which are all plastic -- or the ones with the metal
    > extraction lever in front? I far prefer the latter.


    I do prefer them, too. But I only have seen the ones with platic lever
    once, and found it somewhat cheap made. I also had some 3rd party spuds
    which were also completely plastic and already deformed when pulling
    them out during removal of a hard drive from a system.

    I find the ones with metal lever quite good, much better than most other
    sled/tray/rail system used by other manufacturers. They are simple,
    don't take up much space, and reliable.

    >> the Ultra 40 or if I had to buy new ones (which then probably are
    >> hard to come by without hard drives).

    >
    > You could always find out what Sun charges for them. :) I think that
    > there is a separate barcode number for a bare spud, as well as one
    > for spuds with specific drives pre-installed.


    Right, but I'm not really prepared to pay more for the spud than for the
    drive it should hold ;-)

    And since the only thing that seems to be different between the old
    FC/SCSI spuds and the Ultra 40 spuds is the color, well...

    > Well ... I can't do that I'm afraid. My newest machines are SB-2000,
    > with SB-1000 and Sun Fire 280R coming close to that. :)
    >
    > Note that my FEH covers the SB-1000, but not the SB-2000 or the Sun
    > Fire 280R. (The FEH has a 2000 date, and the badge on the SB-2000
    > say "2002" and "Twenty years of innovation". :)


    When speaking about the SB2000: do you know if all SB2000 had the "20
    years of innovation" writing, or where there certain "anniversary
    models" only?

    Benjamin, thinking of getting a SB200 front cover for his SB1000
    Benjamin Gawert, Sep 18, 2008
    #7
  8. Benjamin Gawert

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-09-18, Benjamin Gawert <> wrote:
    > * DoN. Nichols:
    >> You have the ones which are all plastic -- or the ones with the metal
    >> extraction lever in front? I far prefer the latter.

    >
    > I do prefer them, too. But I only have seen the ones with platic lever
    > once, and found it somewhat cheap made.


    I've got a few. They came with the drives in a 6-hole Multipack
    (9 GB drives), and I've had some failures when pulling drives using
    them. So they are not as satisfactory.

    I have seen *one* failure in the "good" kind. It broke along
    the left side, just behind the hinge. Unfortunately, it was one with
    the WWN for the drive on the lever's label. I wound up figuring out how
    to move the label to an unbroken body so the drive is properly labeled
    again. :)

    > I also had some 3rd party spuds
    > which were also completely plastic and already deformed when pulling
    > them out during removal of a hard drive from a system.


    Ouch!

    > I find the ones with metal lever quite good, much better than most other
    > sled/tray/rail system used by other manufacturers. They are simple,
    > don't take up much space, and reliable.


    Agreed. Not totally perfect, as evidence above. The drive came
    in a SB-1000 FWIW.

    >>> the Ultra 40 or if I had to buy new ones (which then probably are
    >>> hard to come by without hard drives).

    >>
    >> You could always find out what Sun charges for them. :) I think that
    >> there is a separate barcode number for a bare spud, as well as one
    >> for spuds with specific drives pre-installed.

    >
    > Right, but I'm not really prepared to pay more for the spud than for the
    > drive it should hold ;-)


    Understood.

    > And since the only thing that seems to be different between the old
    > FC/SCSI spuds and the Ultra 40 spuds is the color, well...


    Hmm ... color of the side rails and body under the metal lever?

    >> Well ... I can't do that I'm afraid. My newest machines are SB-2000,
    >> with SB-1000 and Sun Fire 280R coming close to that. :)
    >>
    >> Note that my FEH covers the SB-1000, but not the SB-2000 or the Sun
    >> Fire 280R. (The FEH has a 2000 date, and the badge on the SB-2000
    >> say "2002" and "Twenty years of innovation". :)

    >
    > When speaking about the SB2000: do you know if all SB2000 had the "20
    > years of innovation" writing, or where there certain "anniversary
    > models" only?


    I can only speak with certainty about three.

    The one which a friend and neighbor has had for a while.

    The one which I got from an eBay vendor which happened to have a
    1.2 GHz CPU instead of the stated 900 MHz one.

    The second one which I got form the same vendor, to see whether
    there was another 1.2 GHz in it. (There was.) But that one
    arrived with the anti-theft block in place, and had been hit
    hard enough there to bend the back and stress the connector
    stack for TTYA and TTYB (and render the FC-AL disk invisible
    form the CPU, even though it was there.) Well ... it had the
    1.2 GHz in it, which was what mattered to me. Once I pulled the
    system board and installed it in a SB-1000 chassis the system
    would recognize the FC-AL drives again.

    Anyway -- all three have the "2002" and the text. I have no
    idea whether there were any which did not have that. But they also all
    seem to have that front panel which looks so different (and so gaudy)
    when illuminated by electronic flash. :) You've probably noticed this
    in many eBay auctions. :) A few auctions even have some shots with
    electronic flash, and some with the natural lighting in the room.

    > Benjamin, thinking of getting a SB200 front cover for his SB1000


    The front panel only needs two screws (in the CD-ROM cage) and a
    little clearance under the front to disconnect the hooks at the bottom
    to remove it and move it over.

    However -- note that it will look a little strange. The SB-2000
    also has a different color plastic "skin" over the metal chassis. The
    SB-1000 has a fairly light gray skin, while that on the SB-2000 is a
    dark gray-purple.

    If you strip the skin off and move it too, then you will look
    normal. There are tricks to getting them off intact, and the clips for
    the top skin were both broken in the impact which damaged the chassis.
    To get the right-side (the bulge side) off, you have to pull
    *everything* out of the rear chassis. The system board to free the
    power supply connectors, then the power supply itself, then you have to
    reach in with two small screwdrivers to lift two clips (once you figure
    out how they differ from other guides which are part of the skin), and
    then you can slide the skin forward and remove it. It helps to have
    three hands to do this. :) This is also easier to do when the front
    panel is already removed. I *think* that one of the clips for the top
    skin also has to be accessed through the power supply cavity.

    All in all -- if you have a chassis with the skin and front
    panel of an SB-2000 -- just move everything into it. It is easier. :)

    Enjoy,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Sep 19, 2008
    #8
  9. Benjamin Gawert

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-09-18, Trinean <> wrote:
    > "DoN. Nichols" <> wrote in message
    > news:-and-d.com...
    >> Just out of curiosity -- which systems *do* need them? I've
    >> found them on drives in Ultra-2, and in a SB-2000, as well as some
    >> drives which I believe were in a A-1000 prior to them being offered by a
    >> local used computer store. :) But I don't think that I've ever found a
    >> situation where they were *needed*.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> DoN.

    >
    > Servers like Sun Fire V210/240 have them.
    > Storage like the A1000/D1000, A5x00, S1 and D240 all have them.
    > Workstations like the Sun Blade 1000 and 2000 have them.


    O.K. I have only one in a Sun Blade 2000 which has one, and
    several drives without. But these are lower power 1" hight drives, so
    it does not matter.

    And I've run a nearly full 12-slot D-1000 with only a very few
    drives fitted with plates. No problems.

    My Sun Fire 280R came with no drives (picked up at a hamfest),
    so it has never had any drives with cooling plates. Granted, I'm
    running it with fairly recent 146 GB drives, so there is less heat than
    with older drives. (1" high drives are all that will fit in that
    system. :)

    FWIW, the lower drive (drive 0) is at 36 C, and the upper drive
    is at 38 C. The environmental status (according to RSC) is 35 C for the
    interior of the chassis, and 56 C and 55 C for the two 900 MHz Cu CPUs.

    The SB-2000 is running the disks at 32 C (drive 1) and no
    information from drive 1 (Seagate/Hitachi) ST3146807FC.

    And -- for the drives which specify maximum temperature, there
    is quite a bit of elbow room.

    > This is not a comprehensive list.
    > Just what I could think of without going through every system in the
    > handbook.


    Understood.

    > I don't know that they "need" them, but Sun ships the drives for these
    > systems with them on.


    :)

    > My guess is storage like the A1000/D1000 and A5x00 need them the most since
    > the drives are right up against one another.


    Especially the 12-slot A1000/D1000 fully loaded with drives. :)

    Enjoy,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Sep 19, 2008
    #9
  10. * DoN. Nichols:

    > And I've run a nearly full 12-slot D-1000 with only a very few
    > drives fitted with plates. No problems.


    The reason today is probably more to prevent people from touching the
    drive's electronics when pluging them in or removing them. I strongly
    doubt that they are necessary for heat dissipation or protection.

    Benjamin
    Benjamin Gawert, Sep 19, 2008
    #10
  11. * DoN. Nichols:
    >> I do prefer them, too. But I only have seen the ones with platic lever
    >> once, and found it somewhat cheap made.

    >
    > I've got a few. They came with the drives in a 6-hole Multipack
    > (9 GB drives), and I've had some failures when pulling drives using
    > them. So they are not as satisfactory.


    I think I got one with an Ultra 1 or 2. Felt quite flimsy.

    > I have seen *one* failure in the "good" kind. It broke along
    > the left side, just behind the hinge. Unfortunately, it was one with
    > the WWN for the drive on the lever's label. I wound up figuring out how
    > to move the label to an unbroken body so the drive is properly labeled
    > again. :)


    I never had ones of the spuds with metal levers failing, the only thing
    that happens is that one of the small metal ground clips get lost when
    there is no drive in the spud.

    >> I find the ones with metal lever quite good, much better than most other
    >> sled/tray/rail system used by other manufacturers. They are simple,
    >> don't take up much space, and reliable.

    >
    > Agreed. Not totally perfect, as evidence above. The drive came
    > in a SB-1000 FWIW.


    I noticed that in some Sun machines the drives sit somewhat tight, for
    example in the Ultra 60 I had. Removing a drive required a bit of force.
    I checked the backplane and the hard drive containment, but everything
    seemed ok.

    >> And since the only thing that seems to be different between the old
    >> FC/SCSI spuds and the Ultra 40 spuds is the color, well...

    >
    > Hmm ... color of the side rails and body under the metal lever?


    The color of the plastics body, he old ones are usually dark grey with a
    purple release latch...
    <http://i3.ebayimg.com/04/i/001/0d/2c/036c_1.JPG>

    ....the Ultra 40 ones I saw seemed to be light grey):
    <http://i275.photobucket.com/albums/jj306/Sun_Savings/Sun%20Inventory%20List/X8011A/Picture2005.jpg>

    > Anyway -- all three have the "2002" and the text. I have no
    > idea whether there were any which did not have that. But they also all
    > seem to have that front panel which looks so different (and so gaudy)
    > when illuminated by electronic flash. :) You've probably noticed this
    > in many eBay auctions. :) A few auctions even have some shots with
    > electronic flash, and some with the natural lighting in the room.


    Yes, indeed.

    >> Benjamin, thinking of getting a SB200 front cover for his SB1000

    >
    > The front panel only needs two screws (in the CD-ROM cage) and a
    > little clearance under the front to disconnect the hooks at the bottom
    > to remove it and move it over.


    So it's mechanically the same like a SB1000 front cover?

    > However -- note that it will look a little strange. The SB-2000
    > also has a different color plastic "skin" over the metal chassis.


    Ok.

    > The
    > SB-1000 has a fairly light gray skin, while that on the SB-2000 is a
    > dark gray-purple.
    >
    > If you strip the skin off and move it too, then you will look
    > normal. There are tricks to getting them off intact, and the clips for
    > the top skin were both broken in the impact which damaged the chassis.
    > To get the right-side (the bulge side) off, you have to pull
    > *everything* out of the rear chassis. The system board to free the
    > power supply connectors, then the power supply itself, then you have to
    > reach in with two small screwdrivers to lift two clips (once you figure
    > out how they differ from other guides which are part of the skin), and
    > then you can slide the skin forward and remove it. It helps to have
    > three hands to do this. :) This is also easier to do when the front
    > panel is already removed. I *think* that one of the clips for the top
    > skin also has to be accessed through the power supply cavity.
    >
    > All in all -- if you have a chassis with the skin and front
    > panel of an SB-2000 -- just move everything into it. It is easier. :)


    I start to think that's probably better. Or better just wait until a
    cheap SB2500 comes up ;-)

    Benjamin
    Benjamin Gawert, Sep 19, 2008
    #11
  12. Benjamin Gawert

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-09-19, Benjamin Gawert <> wrote:
    > * DoN. Nichols:
    >>> I do prefer them, too. But I only have seen the ones with platic lever
    >>> once, and found it somewhat cheap made.

    >>
    >> I've got a few. They came with the drives in a 6-hole Multipack
    >> (9 GB drives), and I've had some failures when pulling drives using
    >> them. So they are not as satisfactory.

    >
    > I think I got one with an Ultra 1 or 2. Felt quite flimsy.


    O.K. My first Ultra, an Ultra-1, came with no drives, so I had
    to find spuds for it. After that, I've always had a few spare spuds
    around.

    >> I have seen *one* failure in the "good" kind. It broke along
    >> the left side, just behind the hinge. Unfortunately, it was one with
    >> the WWN for the drive on the lever's label. I wound up figuring out how
    >> to move the label to an unbroken body so the drive is properly labeled
    >> again. :)

    >
    > I never had ones of the spuds with metal levers failing, the only thing
    > that happens is that one of the small metal ground clips get lost when
    > there is no drive in the spud.


    I went to Staples and bought a bag of tiny Ziploc baggies --
    about 1" by 1.5" I think. The screws go in there, and Ic heck whether
    the ground clips are loose enough to come out, and if so, they go in the
    bag too. Then after sealing it, I fold the zipper section double and
    tuck it through one of the slots in the side rails to keep it associated
    with the spud.

    >>> I find the ones with metal lever quite good, much better than most other
    >>> sled/tray/rail system used by other manufacturers. They are simple,
    >>> don't take up much space, and reliable.

    >>
    >> Agreed. Not totally perfect, as evidence above. The drive came
    >> in a SB-1000 FWIW.

    >
    > I noticed that in some Sun machines the drives sit somewhat tight, for
    > example in the Ultra 60 I had. Removing a drive required a bit of force.
    > I checked the backplane and the hard drive containment, but everything
    > seemed ok.


    This SB-1000 did not seem particularly stiff once I got the
    drive with the broken spud out and put in a new spud.

    >>> And since the only thing that seems to be different between the old
    >>> FC/SCSI spuds and the Ultra 40 spuds is the color, well...

    >>
    >> Hmm ... color of the side rails and body under the metal lever?

    >
    > The color of the plastics body, he old ones are usually dark grey with a
    > purple release latch...
    ><http://i3.ebayimg.com/04/i/001/0d/2c/036c_1.JPG>
    >
    > ...the Ultra 40 ones I saw seemed to be light grey):
    ><http://i275.photobucket.com/albums/jj306/Sun_Savings/Sun%20Inventory%20List/X8011A/Picture2005.jpg>


    O.K. Quite similar -- Weird color, though.

    [ ... ]

    >>> Benjamin, thinking of getting a SB200 front cover for his SB1000

    >>
    >> The front panel only needs two screws (in the CD-ROM cage) and a
    >> little clearance under the front to disconnect the hooks at the bottom
    >> to remove it and move it over.

    >
    > So it's mechanically the same like a SB1000 front cover?


    Yes. Pop the shroud off the DVD-ROM (and possible SmartCard and
    Floppy), pull the system forward so the front overhands the edge of the
    table/bench by a half inch or so, and remove the two screws. Tilt the
    top gently forward until it clears the drives, slip the bottom down
    about a half inch, and it all lifts clear. I've done such a swap, in
    part because the original front had the top bar broken so it was more
    difficult to install and remove the shroud.

    The logo LEDs are clipped into holders in the metal underpanel,
    so they just stay put.

    >> However -- note that it will look a little strange. The SB-2000
    >> also has a different color plastic "skin" over the metal chassis.

    >
    > Ok.
    >
    >> The
    >> SB-1000 has a fairly light gray skin, while that on the SB-2000 is a
    >> dark gray-purple.
    >>
    >> If you strip the skin off and move it too, then you will look
    >> normal.


    [ ... ]

    >> All in all -- if you have a chassis with the skin and front
    >> panel of an SB-2000 -- just move everything into it. It is easier. :)

    >
    > I start to think that's probably better. Or better just wait until a
    > cheap SB2500 comes up ;-)


    Hmm ... I haven't yet seen a SB-2500. What processor series do
    those use -- and how many?

    Enjoy,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Sep 20, 2008
    #12
  13. * DoN. Nichols:
    >>> All in all -- if you have a chassis with the skin and front
    >>> panel of an SB-2000 -- just move everything into it. It is easier. :)

    >> I start to think that's probably better. Or better just wait until a
    >> cheap SB2500 comes up ;-)

    >
    > Hmm ... I haven't yet seen a SB-2500. What processor series do
    > those use -- and how many?



    http://www.sun.com/desktop/workstation/sunblade2500/specs.xml

    They use UltraSPARC IIIi processors. The main advantage is that on the
    SB2500 both CPUs do have their own RAM (on the SB1000/2000 only the
    primary CPU has directly connected RAM while the secondary CPU doesn't
    which means RAM access from the second CPU takes much longer than from
    the primary one). Besides that, the SB2500 uses faster DDR-SDRAM.

    SB2500's seem to pup up on ebay increasingly often now.

    Benjamin
    Benjamin Gawert, Sep 20, 2008
    #13
  14. Benjamin Gawert

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-09-20, Benjamin Gawert <> wrote:
    > * DoN. Nichols:
    >>>> All in all -- if you have a chassis with the skin and front
    >>>> panel of an SB-2000 -- just move everything into it. It is easier. :)
    >>> I start to think that's probably better. Or better just wait until a
    >>> cheap SB2500 comes up ;-)

    >>
    >> Hmm ... I haven't yet seen a SB-2500. What processor series do
    >> those use -- and how many?

    >
    >
    > http://www.sun.com/desktop/workstation/sunblade2500/specs.xml


    Hmm ... nice looking from what I can see.

    > They use UltraSPARC IIIi processors. The main advantage is that on the
    > SB2500 both CPUs do have their own RAM (on the SB1000/2000 only the
    > primary CPU has directly connected RAM while the secondary CPU doesn't
    > which means RAM access from the second CPU takes much longer than from
    > the primary one). Besides that, the SB2500 uses faster DDR-SDRAM.


    And apparently both CPUs *must* be present -- at least to get up
    to 16 GB of RAM.

    Hmm ... gone back to SCSI internal drives, I see. And I've juts
    made the switchover to FC-AL drives for most systems. :)

    Lots of PCI slots.

    Up to three framebuffers? But they don't explain where to put
    the extra monitors. :) If I could figure that out, I would be running
    two at present, instead of my current one.

    Hmm ... both Solaris 8 and Solaris 10 pre-installed? Dual boot?

    > SB2500's seem to pup up on ebay increasingly often now.


    Hmm ... not very affordable yet, I suspect.

    Thanks,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Sep 21, 2008
    #14
  15. * DoN. Nichols:

    >>> Hmm ... I haven't yet seen a SB-2500. What processor series do
    >>> those use -- and how many?

    >>
    >> http://www.sun.com/desktop/workstation/sunblade2500/specs.xml

    >
    > Hmm ... nice looking from what I can see.


    There are two versions, the older red one and the newer silver one. The
    latter has a different mobo and takes CPUs up to 1.6GHz.

    >> They use UltraSPARC IIIi processors. The main advantage is that on the
    >> SB2500 both CPUs do have their own RAM (on the SB1000/2000 only the
    >> primary CPU has directly connected RAM while the secondary CPU doesn't
    >> which means RAM access from the second CPU takes much longer than from
    >> the primary one). Besides that, the SB2500 uses faster DDR-SDRAM.

    >
    > And apparently both CPUs *must* be present -- at least to get up
    > to 16 GB of RAM.


    Yes. But then it probably doesn't make much sense in most cases to have
    a single processor system with 16GB anyways ;-)

    > Hmm ... gone back to SCSI internal drives, I see. And I've juts
    > made the switchover to FC-AL drives for most systems. :)


    One advantage of SCSI is that it's much easier to find reasonable priced
    146GB and 300GB drives for it. I've seen a 300GB FC-AL drive once on
    ebay, and it did cost a lot more than I paid for my SB1000 with two
    900MHz CPUs and 2GB memory.

    I finally found a reasonable priced 146GB FC-AL drive for my SB1000, though.

    > Lots of PCI slots.
    >
    > Up to three framebuffers? But they don't explain where to put
    > the extra monitors. :) If I could figure that out, I would be running
    > two at present, instead of my current one.


    Personally I prefer a single large one. But up to three gfx cards isn't bad.

    > Hmm ... both Solaris 8 and Solaris 10 pre-installed? Dual boot?
    >
    >> SB2500's seem to pup up on ebay increasingly often now.

    >
    > Hmm ... not very affordable yet, I suspect.


    Just wait, it wasn't too long ago when SB2000's were equally expensive.
    There also are OEM versions (SB2500 with beige case) which pop up
    occasionally on ebay. The only difference between the OEM version and
    the "real" Sun version is the case color (OEM even has the Sun logo).

    Benjamin
    Benjamin Gawert, Sep 23, 2008
    #15
  16. Benjamin Gawert

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    On 2008-09-23, Benjamin Gawert <> wrote:
    > * DoN. Nichols:
    >
    >>>> Hmm ... I haven't yet seen a SB-2500. What processor series do
    >>>> those use -- and how many?
    >>>
    >>> http://www.sun.com/desktop/workstation/sunblade2500/specs.xml

    >>
    >> Hmm ... nice looking from what I can see.

    >
    > There are two versions, the older red one and the newer silver one. The
    > latter has a different mobo and takes CPUs up to 1.6GHz.


    O.K.

    >>> They use UltraSPARC IIIi processors. The main advantage is that on the
    >>> SB2500 both CPUs do have their own RAM (on the SB1000/2000 only the
    >>> primary CPU has directly connected RAM while the secondary CPU doesn't
    >>> which means RAM access from the second CPU takes much longer than from
    >>> the primary one). Besides that, the SB2500 uses faster DDR-SDRAM.

    >>
    >> And apparently both CPUs *must* be present -- at least to get up
    >> to 16 GB of RAM.

    >
    > Yes. But then it probably doesn't make much sense in most cases to have
    > a single processor system with 16GB anyways ;-)


    So I would guess that you could load up to 8 GB of RAM with a
    single processor, and to go beyond that, you would need two.

    >> Hmm ... gone back to SCSI internal drives, I see. And I've juts
    >> made the switchover to FC-AL drives for most systems. :)

    >
    > One advantage of SCSI is that it's much easier to find reasonable priced
    > 146GB and 300GB drives for it. I've seen a 300GB FC-AL drive once on
    > ebay, and it did cost a lot more than I paid for my SB1000 with two
    > 900MHz CPUs and 2GB memory.


    Hmm ... I've recently seen 146 GB FC-AL drives go for less than
    $20.00 on eBay.

    > I finally found a reasonable priced 146GB FC-AL drive for my SB1000, though.


    Good!

    I would love to stumble over a lot of 20 of them at a hamfest as
    I did with the 73 GB ones. Another cycle of upgrades in the zfs pools,
    without having to shut down the system at all -- just swap in one drive
    at a time and let it resilver. :) I've done that in the upgrade from
    36 GB drives to 73 GB drives. The pool still stays the same size until
    the last drive is replaced, when it jumps to the larger capacity.

    >> Lots of PCI slots.
    >>
    >> Up to three framebuffers? But they don't explain where to put
    >> the extra monitors. :) If I could figure that out, I would be running
    >> two at present, instead of my current one.

    >
    > Personally I prefer a single large one. But up to three gfx cards isn't bad.


    Where two would be nice is when doing CAD or similar graphics
    work -- one for the image being built/modified, and the other for the
    command line and such.

    >> Hmm ... both Solaris 8 and Solaris 10 pre-installed? Dual boot?
    >>
    >>> SB2500's seem to pup up on ebay increasingly often now.

    >>
    >> Hmm ... not very affordable yet, I suspect.

    >
    > Just wait, it wasn't too long ago when SB2000's were equally expensive.


    Sure.

    > There also are OEM versions (SB2500 with beige case) which pop up
    > occasionally on ebay. The only difference between the OEM version and
    > the "real" Sun version is the case color (OEM even has the Sun logo).


    Of course you can always disable the custom logo in the OBP and
    go back to Sun's default logo. :)

    Enjoy,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
    DoN. Nichols, Sep 23, 2008
    #16
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Books4bars

    WTB 595-3286 Quad Box Sleds (340-2848-01)

    Books4bars, Jun 30, 2004, in forum: Sun Hardware
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    200
    Books4bars
    Jun 30, 2004
  2. Johnny Chong

    Sun Ultra 5 is similar to Sun Ultra 10

    Johnny Chong, Aug 4, 2004, in forum: Sun Hardware
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    243
    WilliamREMOVEWyattTHIS
    Aug 4, 2004
  3. Chong YL

    Sun Ultra 5 similar to Sun Ultra 10

    Chong YL, Aug 4, 2004, in forum: Sun Hardware
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    257
    Aule Mahal
    Aug 4, 2004
  4. ohaya
    Replies:
    26
    Views:
    1,255
    ohaya
    Mar 27, 2006
  5. Cool dude

    Drive sleds for CD-ROM's

    Cool dude, Oct 25, 2003, in forum: Apple
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    202
    Peter KERR
    Oct 26, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page