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Underclock?

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by Boon, Aug 13, 2007.

  1. Boon

    Boon Guest

    Folks,

    I have a 6-year old Asus A7V133 motherboard with an AMD T-bird 1000,
    running at 1 GHz. It's a nice computer, but the CPU throws off a lot of
    heat. What if I ran it at 900 MHz, or 800? Would it be substantially
    cooler or just a little cooler? I'd be happy to trade some speed for less
    heat, but I have no idea of the relationship between GHz and heat. Is it
    linear?

    Thanks for your thoughts.

    - Dave
    Boon, Aug 13, 2007
    #1
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  2. Boon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Dave' wrote:
    | I have a 6-year old Asus A7V133 motherboard with an AMD T-bird 1000,
    | running at 1 GHz. It's a nice computer, but the CPU throws off a lot of
    | heat. What if I ran it at 900 MHz, or 800? Would it be substantially
    | cooler or just a little cooler? I'd be happy to trade some speed for less
    | heat, but I have no idea of the relationship between GHz and heat. Is it
    | linear?
    _____

    If it's run six years, then I wouldn't worry about how heat is generated,
    unless, of course you don't have sufficient ventilation to keep the system
    case interior reasonably cool. I'd guess an AMD T-bird 1000 would create
    about 40 Watts of heat; +/- 10 extra watts is not going to make much
    difference in the overall system temperature, and that is about all the
    difference that a 100 MHz or 200 MHz speed reduction would make, even if the
    CPU core voltage can be reduced also. (ALL the power applied to a CPU is
    turned into heat - save for a very, very, very tiny amount carried out as
    data.)

    You can use archives from the AMD site to find more exact details.
    None of the power/speed/voltage relationships are linear. In a strictly
    resistive load, the power varies with the square of the voltage applied
    (double the voltage, the current doubles equaling 4 times the power. A CPU
    is not a resistive load, and also uses more power when a signal state is
    switched than when it is steady. You might be able to find power
    consumption vs. voltage and speeds for new CPUs.
    "Boon" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns998BBE5744D05ddboonastrawebnet@216.151.153.66...
    | Folks,
    |
    | I have a 6-year old Asus A7V133 motherboard with an AMD T-bird 1000,
    | running at 1 GHz. It's a nice computer, but the CPU throws off a lot of
    | heat. What if I ran it at 900 MHz, or 800? Would it be substantially
    | cooler or just a little cooler? I'd be happy to trade some speed for less
    | heat, but I have no idea of the relationship between GHz and heat. Is it
    | linear?
    |
    | Thanks for your thoughts.
    |
    | - Dave
    Phil Weldon, Aug 14, 2007
    #2
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  3. Boon

    Ed Light Guest

    I built an XP 2000+ for a friend and a good heatsink wouldn't fit
    because of a capacitor close to the cpu socket. So I put on a so-so
    heatsink, and it ran a bit hot for my taste. Lowering the fsb from 133
    to 100 totally solved it.
    ---
    Ed Light

    Bring the Troops Home:
    http://bringthemhomenow.org
    http://antiwar.com

    Send spam to the FTC at

    Thanks, robots.
    Ed Light, Aug 15, 2007
    #3
  4. Boon

    Boon Guest

    Thanks to Phil and Ed -- your comments motivated me to check things out a
    little.

    Following Ed's suggestion I changed the FSB from 133 to 100. This change
    also reduced the CPU from 1000 MHz to 750. The exhaust air and the case
    under the CPU air seemed a little cooler.

    I found and installed Asus "Probe" software that takes the CPU's
    temperature. It reported that the CPU is about 56 degrees C after half an
    hour at 1000 MHz idle, and about 52 degrees at 750. I say "about" because
    the temps drifted around a little. Probe reported voltages, too, but they
    were the same.

    Phil is right, if this computer hasn't burnt up in 6 years, it's not going
    to. But then, I just don't like this computer because of its heat, so I
    don't use it much. I think I'll run it at 100 FSB, and look for better
    fans.

    Thanks again, guys, for your thoughts.
    Boon, Aug 16, 2007
    #4
  5. Boon

    Ed Light Guest


    > I found and installed Asus "Probe" software that takes the CPU's
    > temperature. It reported that the CPU is about 56 degrees C after half an
    > hour at 1000 MHz idle, and about 52 degrees at 750.


    That's awful much too hot. That's only at idle and you never want it to
    touch 60 because it gets into the zone where it can make little errors.
    Best to download prime95 and run the torture test and see how hot it
    gets, and whether it makes any errors, or just load it up with something
    that uses 100% cpu to see how hot it gets, and first heat the room to as
    hot as it will get in summer.

    The 2000+ that's now at 1250 just reaches the low 50's at full load.
    ---
    Ed Light

    Bring the Troops Home:
    http://bringthemhomenow.org
    http://antiwar.com

    Send spam to the FTC at

    Thanks, robots.
    Ed Light, Aug 17, 2007
    #5
  6. Boon

    Boon Guest

    Ed,

    Right, this thing is too hot.

    I posted "Underclock?" to this newsgroup on Monday. On Wednesday NewEgg
    sent me an ad for a Centurion 522 case for $30, which I couldn't resist. I
    bought it, and it was delivered today. Looks like a nice case, especially
    for $30.

    I'm going to move my too-hot computer into this new case, which has 120 mm
    fans. (I'm using 80 now, front and back.) I'm sure this will help, but I
    probably also need a better heat sink and CPU fan. I just checked NewEgg
    and Tiger Direct -- both still stock Socket A heat sink/ fans.

    Then I might try overclocking!

    - Dave
    Boon, Aug 18, 2007
    #6
  7. Boon

    Ed Light Guest

    Ed Light, Aug 18, 2007
    #7
  8. Boon

    Ed Light Guest

    Ed Light, Aug 18, 2007
    #8
  9. Boon

    Ed Light Guest

    Ed Light, Aug 18, 2007
    #9
  10. Boon

    Ed Light Guest

    BTW, was that an Athlon 1000? I don't think those are hard to cool.
    > Then I might try overclocking!

    If it's a 1000, I don't think there's alot of room there.

    ---
    Ed Light

    Bring the Troops Home:
    http://bringthemhomenow.org
    http://antiwar.com

    Send spam to the FTC at

    Thanks, robots.
    Ed Light, Aug 18, 2007
    #10
  11. Boon

    Boon Guest

    Ed,

    Thank you very much for the references. I'm still studying them. I am
    experimenting with lower CPU voltages based on the references, and finding
    substantial temperature reductions and so far, no problems. My CPU is an
    AMD Athlon ThunderBird 1000, Model AMT3C.

    Thanks again for your help.

    - Dave
    Boon, Aug 18, 2007
    #11
  12. Boon

    Ed Light Guest

    Hi, Dave.

    Yes, those are neat articles. Glad they're so fascinating!

    Sort of off-topic:

    It's amazing how great that cpu can run XP, especially with a 7200 rpm
    hard disk and enough memory. I upgraded a person's Win ME rig with that
    very cpu in it. It just had a little aluminum heatsink, and the temps
    were ok, but it had a very loud, fast little fan on the heatsink. It had
    128mb of ram, and I added 256. XP starts up using 256, so it was enough.

    I did another rig Win 98 to XP that was the Athlon XP running at 1250,
    where I had to lower the bus to cool it off.

    On both rigs, I ordered the memory online and set up the software while
    waiting for it, with only 128Mb installed. That radically inhibited the
    one with the 5400 rpm disk, but the one with the 7200 wasn't that bad.
    Nice disk swapping. Of course, when the memory came, it was like night
    and day.

    Both users are really happy.

    I'm really glad I imaged their hard drives, though, because one of the
    XPs became unbootable. I stuck that hd in my computer and lifted all the
    data, then just replaced C: from the image (using bootitng) and copied
    the data in.

    With the NTFS file system, huge Outlook Express mailboxes open many
    times faster than with the old fat32.
    ---
    Ed Light

    Bring the Troops Home:
    http://bringthemhomenow.org
    http://antiwar.com

    Send spam to the FTC at

    Thanks, robots.
    Ed Light, Aug 19, 2007
    #12
  13. Boon

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Boon wrote:
    > Thanks to Phil and Ed -- your comments motivated me to check things
    > out a little.
    >
    > Following Ed's suggestion I changed the FSB from 133 to 100. This
    > change also reduced the CPU from 1000 MHz to 750. The exhaust air
    > and the case under the CPU air seemed a little cooler.
    >
    > I found and installed Asus "Probe" software that takes the CPU's
    > temperature. It reported that the CPU is about 56 degrees C after
    > half an hour at 1000 MHz idle, and about 52 degrees at 750. I say
    > "about" because the temps drifted around a little. Probe reported
    > voltages, too, but they were the same.
    >
    > Phil is right, if this computer hasn't burnt up in 6 years, it's not
    > going to. But then, I just don't like this computer because of its
    > heat, so I don't use it much. I think I'll run it at 100 FSB, and
    > look for better fans.
    >
    > Thanks again, guys, for your thoughts.


    I have an XP2500+ Barton that will run at XP3200+ speed at default vcore
    (actually at default - 0.05V). It's quite well cooled so heat isn't an
    issue. However, for a while there I wasn't doing anything demanding and the
    beast was on 24/7 torrenting etc. so I decided to slow it down a bit. I
    dropped it from 2.2GHz and 1.60Vcore to 1.5GHz and 1.35Vcore (tested stable)
    and it worked well. Not *that* much slower responding (I kept it on a 200MHz
    FSB) and significantly less power consumption/heat. I used to have a site
    bookmarked that allowed you to input your CPU details, family, speed and
    voltage, and give you a 100% consumption figure (in watts) and an idle
    figure. (Lost the URL). The drop I did with mine reduced the CPU power
    consumption (and heat production) by 50%.
    --
    TTFN.

    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Aug 19, 2007
    #13
  14. Boon

    Ed Light Guest

    Ed Light, Aug 31, 2007
    #14
  15. Boon

    Boon Guest

    Ed,

    Sorry for the delayed reply -- I haven't visited this newsgroup in a
    while. The new case works fine. I'm still using the underclock settings
    I mentioned on August 16, running a 1 GHz Thunderbird CPU at 750 MHz.
    The result is a very cool system that I use regularly. The CPU gets up
    to about 49 degrees under heavy use.

    Thanks, guys, for your advice.

    - Boon


    Ed Light <> wrote in news:3vIBi.219095$g86.148201
    @newsfe14.lga:

    >
    > Boon -- how did things turn out? How's you new case?
    >
    > ---
    > Ed Light
    >
    > Bring the Troops Home:
    > http://bringthemhomenow.org
    > http://antiwar.com
    >
    > Send spam to the FTC at
    >
    > Thanks, robots.
    Boon, Nov 11, 2007
    #15
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