Value of Launchpad?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Peter Clemenza, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. I'm not sure I see any value added to Launchpad in Lion. What more does
    it offer than just clicking on the Applications folder in the Dock?

    --
    Leave the gun, take the cannoli.
    Peter Clemenza, Jan 3, 2012
    #1
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  2. Peter Clemenza

    nospam Guest

    In article <je042d$951$>, Peter Clemenza
    <> wrote:

    > I'm not sure I see any value added to Launchpad in Lion. What more does
    > it offer than just clicking on the Applications folder in the Dock?


    it brings the os x one step closer merging with ios and ipads.
    nospam, Jan 4, 2012
    #2
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  3. Peter Clemenza

    sbt Guest

    In article <030120121637110441%>, nospam
    <> wrote:

    > In article <je042d$951$>, Peter Clemenza
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > I'm not sure I see any value added to Launchpad in Lion. What more does
    > > it offer than just clicking on the Applications folder in the Dock?

    >
    > it brings the os x one step closer merging with ios and ipads.


    This is an oft-repeated and not completely accurate assessment.
    Launchpad (and the iOS interface) are both derivative of Finder
    alternatives from Apple that date back over a decade, such as Simple
    Finder. They used to be spoken of as "HyperCard-like."

    Remember, everything old is new again :)

    LaunchPad, like SimpleFinder and other alternatives, have benefit for
    users that are organizationally-challenged, including small children,
    some technophobic individuals, and some seniors with visual/dexterity
    issues.

    --
    Spenser
    sbt, Jan 4, 2012
    #3
  4. Peter Clemenza

    Király Guest

    Peter Clemenza <> wrote:
    > I'm not sure I see any value added to Launchpad in Lion. What more does
    > it offer than just clicking on the Applications folder in the Dock?


    The iOS-inspired app launcher offers nothing to the experienced OS X
    user. Hunting around a grid of icons to find the app you want and then
    clicking to open it was how the original Mac worked in 1984, and was
    revolutionary at the time. It became obsolete when app launcing was
    added to the Apple menu in 1991 and then to the Dock in 2001. In 2005,
    Spotlight introduced app launching with a few keystrokes, no more
    mouse/trackpad needed. Was anyone by 2005 still opening a Finder window
    in icon view anymore, just to find and open an app?

    So why return to the obsolete-for-20-years regimen of hunting around a
    grid of icons just to open an app?

    Because it's designed to appeal to a millions-strong set of users that
    Apple sees as ripe for the picking: People who know their iPhones and
    iPads inside out, but who have not yet switched from Windows to the Mac.

    Longtime MacOS/OS X user on Launchpad: It works just like on my iPad.
    How silly.

    Windows switcher on Launchpad: It works just like on my iPad. How cool.

    See the point now? iOS-device-toting Windows users will love it for its
    instant familiarity. OS X users who can recognize an
    obsolete-for-20-years way to open apps when they see it, can simply
    ignore it.

    --
    K.

    Lang may your lum reek.
    Király, Jan 4, 2012
    #4
  5. On 1/3/12 9:08 PM, Király wrote:
    > Peter Clemenza<> wrote:
    >> I'm not sure I see any value added to Launchpad in Lion. What more does
    >> it offer than just clicking on the Applications folder in the Dock?

    >
    > The iOS-inspired app launcher offers nothing to the experienced OS X
    > user. Hunting around a grid of icons to find the app you want and then
    > clicking to open it was how the original Mac worked in 1984, and was
    > revolutionary at the time. It became obsolete when app launcing was
    > added to the Apple menu in 1991 and then to the Dock in 2001. In 2005,
    > Spotlight introduced app launching with a few keystrokes, no more
    > mouse/trackpad needed. Was anyone by 2005 still opening a Finder window
    > in icon view anymore, just to find and open an app?
    >
    > So why return to the obsolete-for-20-years regimen of hunting around a
    > grid of icons just to open an app?
    >
    > Because it's designed to appeal to a millions-strong set of users that
    > Apple sees as ripe for the picking: People who know their iPhones and
    > iPads inside out, but who have not yet switched from Windows to the Mac.
    >
    > Longtime MacOS/OS X user on Launchpad: It works just like on my iPad.
    > How silly.
    >
    > Windows switcher on Launchpad: It works just like on my iPad. How cool.
    >
    > See the point now? iOS-device-toting Windows users will love it for its
    > instant familiarity. OS X users who can recognize an
    > obsolete-for-20-years way to open apps when they see it, can simply
    > ignore it.
    >


    Thanks. Poof--- I just gained an inch of space my Dock!

    --
    Leave the gun, take the cannoli.
    Peter Clemenza, Jan 4, 2012
    #5
  6. Peter Clemenza

    Király Guest

    Peter Clemenza <> wrote:
    > Thanks. Poof--- I just gained an inch of space my Dock!


    Be glad that you can. In early developer builds of Lion it was not
    possible to remove Launchpad from the Dock.

    --
    K.

    Lang may your lum reek.
    Király, Jan 5, 2012
    #6
  7. Launchpad could be very useful except it's almost impossible (without taking a week) to configure now. You can't move more than one item at a time and you can't have nested folders and it doesn't even have the fast multi-screen arranging that iTunes lets you do for your iPhone and iPad!

    If it had these features, I would use it, but I spent about an hour trying to clean up the 8 screens worth of icons that it created for me from all myapps. I realized it would take days to make it how I wanted, and then still not really without nested folders.

    Back to Launchbar. I'm a keyboard guy anyway, but GUIs are nice when I'm looking for something I don't use often and don't remember the name.

    David
    unfrostedpoptart, Jan 8, 2012
    #7
  8. Peter Clemenza

    John Young Guest

    In article
    <5872175.1490.1326058722713.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@yqdj19>,
    unfrostedpoptart <> wrote:

    > Launchpad could be very useful except it's almost impossible (without taking
    > a week) to configure now. You can't move more than one item at a time and
    > you can't have nested folders and it doesn't even have the fast multi-screen
    > arranging that iTunes lets you do for your iPhone and iPad!
    >
    > If it had these features, I would use it, but I spent about an hour trying to
    > clean up the 8 screens worth of icons that it created for me from all my
    > apps. I realized it would take days to make it how I wanted, and then still
    > not really without nested folders.
    >
    > Back to Launchbar. I'm a keyboard guy anyway, but GUIs are nice when I'm
    > looking for something I don't use often and don't remember the name.
    >
    > David


    I don't use Launchpad and Launchpad doesn't bother me. I did take it
    out of the dock but other then that I would not know I had the three
    pages of Apps I have and that Launchpad was installed on my Mac. You
    have eight screens worth of Icons...Thats a lot but nothing wrong with
    that. Anyway I now use Keyboard Maestro, its amazing what it will do.
    Before Lion I used QuicKeys, Jumpcut and USB Overdrive. Keyboard Maestro
    does all of what I was doing with the other three Apps, with ease. I was
    using USB Overdrive for a kensington Expert mouse. I do realize Keyboard
    Maestro or QuicKeys would have but the buttons on my kensington Expert
    mouse to use but it was so easy in Keyboard Maestro I just scraped USB
    Overdrive. I would recommend Keyboard Maestro to all that don't have
    trouble using iTunes. Keyboard Maestro is in the Apple app store.
    Disclaimer: I only wish I worked for Apple.
    John
    John Young, Jan 9, 2012
    #8
  9. Peter Clemenza

    TaliesinSoft Guest

    On 2012-01-09 00:34:56 +0000, John Young said:

    [commenting on launching applications]

    > Anyway I now use Keyboard Maestro, its amazing what it will do.


    I'm a visual person, one who doesn't like to remember a bunch of
    keystrokes, but one who likes to use my MagicTrackpad whenever
    possible. As far as launching an application that is not in my dock I
    find Spotlight quite capable of doing the job, although I am trying to
    see if LaunchPad might be easier for me use.


    --
    James Leo Ryan - Austin, Texas
    TaliesinSoft, Jan 9, 2012
    #9
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