What Asus Motherboard for video editing workstation?

Discussion in 'Asus' started by ulixi@emmail.it, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. Guest

    Hi, a friend of mine have just told me to buy an ASUS SABERTOOTH X58
    for my video editing. I have just noticed it costs much. My budget for
    all workstation is around 2.000 euro.
    In your opinion is there another Asus motherboard good like ASUS
    SABERTOOTH X58? If you tell me ASUS SABERTOOTH X58 is the best option
    for me, I will buy it.
    Thanks for your suggestions.
     
    , Jan 10, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, a friend of mine have just told me to buy an ASUS SABERTOOTH X58
    > for my video editing. I have just noticed it costs much. My budget for
    > all workstation is around 2.000 euro.
    > In your opinion is there another Asus motherboard good like ASUS
    > SABERTOOTH X58? If you tell me ASUS SABERTOOTH X58 is the best option
    > for me, I will buy it.
    > Thanks for your suggestions.


    I think the SABERTOOTH X58 is ASUS' cheapest Intel X58 Express Chipset
    motherboard. The next cheapest model is the P6X58D-E and it costs $35 U.S.
    (~?27.13) more.
     
    Homer Jay Simpson, Jan 10, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Guest

    >I think the SABERTOOTH X58 is ASUS' cheapest Intel X58 Express Chipset
    >motherboard. The next cheapest model is the P6X58D-E and it costs $35 U.S.
    >(~?27.13) more.


    Do they work with Intel i7 2600 Box Sandy Bridge?
    thank yoy
     
    , Jan 10, 2011
    #3
  4. Paul Guest

    wrote:
    >> I think the SABERTOOTH X58 is ASUS' cheapest Intel X58 Express Chipset
    >> motherboard. The next cheapest model is the P6X58D-E and it costs $35 U.S.
    >> (~?27.13) more.

    >
    > Do they work with Intel i7 2600 Box Sandy Bridge?
    > thank yoy


    Sandy Bridge is LGA1155 socket, so does not fit in
    an LGA1366 motherboard. Intel uses many sockets
    now. LGA1155 is brand new, and such motherboards
    are just arriving. Sabertooth X58 is LGA1366 and
    is older.

    You can use the CPU support table, select CPU and
    find the 2600 in there.

    http://support.asus.com.tw/cpusupport/cpusupport.aspx?SLanguage=en-us

    Core i7-2600 (3.4G,L3:8M,iGPU,4C,HT,rev.D2)

    Motherboard Since PCB Since BIOS Note

    Maximus IV Extreme
    P8H67
    P8H67-M
    P8H67-M EVO
    P8H67-M PRO
    P8H67-V
    P8P67
    P8P67 DELUXE
    P8P67 EVO
    P8P67 LE
    P8P67 PRO
    P8P67-M
    P8P67-M PRO
    Sabertooth P67

    The Newegg site lists 54 different models of motherboards
    with LGA1155 sockets, ranging in price from $79 to $320. They
    probably went on sale last week.

    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-131-681-Z03?$S640W$

    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-131-681-Z02?$S640W$

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jan 10, 2011
    #4
  5. Guest

    Thanks a ot for your suggestion. A last question please:
    If I will buy an i7 2600k, can I buy a cheap videocard or is ir better
    to buy a videocard at least of 200 euro?
    thanks again


    > Maximus IV Extreme
    > P8H67
    > P8H67-M
    > P8H67-M EVO
    > P8H67-M PRO
    > P8H67-V
    > P8P67
    > P8P67 DELUXE
    > P8P67 EVO
    > P8P67 LE
    > P8P67 PRO
    > P8P67-M
    > P8P67-M PRO
    > Sabertooth P67
    >
    >The Newegg site lists 54 different models of motherboards
    >with LGA1155 sockets, ranging in price from $79 to $320. They
    >probably went on sale last week.
    >
    >http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-131-681-Z03?$S640W$
    >
    >http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-131-681-Z02?$S640W$
    >
    > Paul
     
    , Jan 10, 2011
    #5
  6. Clas Mehus Guest

    On Mon, 10 Jan 2011 22:13:15 +0100, wrote:

    >Thanks a ot for your suggestion. A last question please:
    >If I will buy an i7 2600k, can I buy a cheap videocard or is ir better
    >to buy a videocard at least of 200 euro?
    >thanks again


    An idea could be to buy one of the P8P67-board with HyperDuo. So far,
    I love this feature. Makes a setup where you put together a SSD and a
    standard HDD, and it get optimized so that files you want fast is on
    the SSD, but you don't have to worry about diskspace...

    If you don't use the pc for games of video editing software that use
    the videoboard for acceleration (e.g. in some, like Premiere Pro, you
    can encode h.264 faster thorugh the videocard) you don't need a
    expensive videoboard.



    --
    Clas Mehus
    - "Den som har flest prylar när han dör vinner..."
     
    Clas Mehus, Jan 10, 2011
    #6
  7. Guest

    >An idea could be to buy one of the P8P67-board with HyperDuo. So far,
    >I love this feature. Makes a setup where you put together a SSD and a
    >standard HDD, and it get optimized so that files you want fast is on
    >the SSD, but you don't have to worry about diskspace...


    I'm sorry but I take an interest for it but I don't understand fine.
    I'd like to understand.... I will use a SSD for OS, 2 hardisks RAD0
    for video editing and 2 hardisks RAD0 for exporting . Can I get
    advantage using P8P67-board with HyperDuo?
    Thanks for your suggestions
     
    , Jan 10, 2011
    #7
  8. Paul Guest

    wrote:
    > Thanks a ot for your suggestion. A last question please:
    > If I will buy an i7 2600k, can I buy a cheap videocard or is ir better
    > to buy a videocard at least of 200 euro?
    > thanks again
    >


    A video card of 200 euro, would be for playing 3D games. Some
    video cards and video editing suites do rendering with the
    GPU on the video card, which would be a reason for wanting
    a video card. But otherwise, the built-in graphics might be fine.

    The 2600K has integrated graphics, if you want to use them.

    http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=52214&processor=i7-2600K&spec-codes=

    You have to check the chipset and motherboard, to see if
    the integrated graphics support is there as well.

    The H67 on the left here, has support for built-in video.

    http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/cpu/intel/sandybridge/review/chipsets.jpg

    but there will also be a graphics card slot on the motherboard.

    This is an example of an H67 motherboard, and it has the
    connectors on it, for your computer monitor. Those connectors
    take up space on the backplate, which could be used for other
    things.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128461

    The only reason for getting an H67 motherboard, as near as I
    can tell, is for this.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/4083/...-core-i7-2600k-i5-2500k-core-i3-2100-tested/9

    "There’s just one hangup to all of this Quick Sync greatness:
    it only works if the processor’s GPU is enabled. In other
    words, on a desktop with a single monitor connected to a
    discrete GPU, you can’t use Quick Sync."

    Quick Sync is a gimmick, for transcoding video. It is pretty fast,
    but it also has limitations. It uses "fixed function" blocks inside
    the Sandy Bridge processor, so it may not accelerate the kind of
    video you have. It would be better to depend on the processor
    for rendering video, because it will always work, and has the
    best potential for quality.

    If you're not even remotely interested in the gimmick properties
    (Quick Sync video transcoder) of your new processor, you can also
    get a P67 motherboard. Since there are no graphics connectors in
    the I/O plate area, there is more room for other connector
    types.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128464

    From left to right on that one:

    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-128-464-Z02?$S640W$

    (2) USB2 (i.e. use one of them for your mouse)
    PS/2 keyboard connector

    SPDIF TOSLINK optical audio connection
    SPDIF copper coaxial audio connection

    (2) Firewire 1394a connectors (one 4 pin, one 6 pin)
    (2) USB2
    (2) ESATAp connectors, combining both ESATA, power, and USB signals.
    (ESATAp is for bus powering ESATA drives, a relatively new standard)
    (4) USB3 ports (presumably connected to two NEC USB3 chips)
    (1) RJ45 for Ethernet, Gigabit speed
    (6) HDaudio analog audio signals

    By putting two ESATA on the back plate, that leaves only four SATA connectors
    left on the motherboard surface. The Southbridge usually has a total of
    six SATA ports, and I guess in this case, two of those are driving the ESATA
    port.

    What you buy, really depends on your usage pattern. If you like to connect
    different ESATA drives all the time, then you'll prefer more ESATA connectors
    on the back of the computer.

    That motherboard also has two video card slots (running at x8 each, when
    both are in usage). And a third PCI Express slot is wired with x4 lanes,
    and that would be suitable for a PCI Express RAID card. There are also
    a couple PCI slots on that one, which allows an older Audigy sound card
    to be used if you want.

    You have to examine the slot mix carefully, to make sure all your cards
    can physically fit, when selecting a motherboard.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Jan 11, 2011
    #8
  9. Guest

    I have noticed you know very fine the matter. I'm an inexperienced guy
    compared to you. ;)
    Can you give me other your suggestions please?
    I'd like to assemble a new workstation with i72600k Sandy Bridge.
    My video editing will be with AVCHD files (heavy).
    I post my config and I hope you can verify it:

    1) I'd like a light overlocking (if it is useful)
    2) On motherboard I have to add two Canopus cards:
    Canopus NX PCI Express and expansion Kit
    3) One SSD INTEL X25-M POSTVILLE 80GB for OS, 2 WD CAVIAR BLACK 1TB
    CAD. SATA 3 iwith RAID0 for videoediting and 2 hard disk iwith RAID0
    for export video files.

    Could you seggest the right components so that I will not spend waste
    of money, please?
    Thanks a lot!!



    >A video card of 200 euro, would be for playing 3D games. Some
    >video cards and video editing suites do rendering with the
    >GPU on the video card, which would be a reason for wanting
    >a video card. But otherwise, the built-in graphics might be fine.
    >
    >The 2600K has integrated graphics, if you want to use them.
    >
    >http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=52214&processor=i7-2600K&spec-codes=
    >
    >You have to check the chipset and motherboard, to see if
    >the integrated graphics support is there as well.
    >
    >The H67 on the left here, has support for built-in video.
    >
    >http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/cpu/intel/sandybridge/review/chipsets.jpg
    >
    >but there will also be a graphics card slot on the motherboard.
    >
    >This is an example of an H67 motherboard, and it has the
    >connectors on it, for your computer monitor. Those connectors
    >take up space on the backplate, which could be used for other
    >things.
    >
    >http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128461
    >
    >The only reason for getting an H67 motherboard, as near as I
    >can tell, is for this.
    >
    >http://www.anandtech.com/show/4083/...-core-i7-2600k-i5-2500k-core-i3-2100-tested/9
    >
    > "There’s just one hangup to all of this Quick Sync greatness:
    > it only works if the processor’s GPU is enabled. In other
    > words, on a desktop with a single monitor connected to a
    > discrete GPU, you can’t use Quick Sync."
    >
    >Quick Sync is a gimmick, for transcoding video. It is pretty fast,
    >but it also has limitations. It uses "fixed function" blocks inside
    >the Sandy Bridge processor, so it may not accelerate the kind of
    >video you have. It would be better to depend on the processor
    >for rendering video, because it will always work, and has the
    >best potential for quality.
    >
    >If you're not even remotely interested in the gimmick properties
    >(Quick Sync video transcoder) of your new processor, you can also
    >get a P67 motherboard. Since there are no graphics connectors in
    >the I/O plate area, there is more room for other connector
    >types.
    >
    >http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128464
    >
    > From left to right on that one:
    >
    >http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-128-464-Z02?$S640W$
    >
    > (2) USB2 (i.e. use one of them for your mouse)
    > PS/2 keyboard connector
    >
    > SPDIF TOSLINK optical audio connection
    > SPDIF copper coaxial audio connection
    >
    > (2) Firewire 1394a connectors (one 4 pin, one 6 pin)
    > (2) USB2
    > (2) ESATAp connectors, combining both ESATA, power, and USB signals.
    > (ESATAp is for bus powering ESATA drives, a relatively new standard)
    > (4) USB3 ports (presumably connected to two NEC USB3 chips)
    > (1) RJ45 for Ethernet, Gigabit speed
    > (6) HDaudio analog audio signals
    >
    >By putting two ESATA on the back plate, that leaves only four SATA connectors
    >left on the motherboard surface. The Southbridge usually has a total of
    >six SATA ports, and I guess in this case, two of those are driving the ESATA
    >port.
    >
    >What you buy, really depends on your usage pattern. If you like to connect
    >different ESATA drives all the time, then you'll prefer more ESATA connectors
    >on the back of the computer.
    >
    >That motherboard also has two video card slots (running at x8 each, when
    >both are in usage). And a third PCI Express slot is wired with x4 lanes,
    >and that would be suitable for a PCI Express RAID card. There are also
    >a couple PCI slots on that one, which allows an older Audigy sound card
    >to be used if you want.
    >
    >You have to examine the slot mix carefully, to make sure all your cards
    >can physically fit, when selecting a motherboard.
    >
    >HTH,
    > Paul
     
    , Jan 11, 2011
    #9
  10. Paul Guest

    wrote:
    > I have noticed you know very fine the matter. I'm an inexperienced guy
    > compared to you. ;)
    > Can you give me other your suggestions please?
    > I'd like to assemble a new workstation with i72600k Sandy Bridge.
    > My video editing will be with AVCHD files (heavy).
    > I post my config and I hope you can verify it:
    >
    > 1) I'd like a light overlocking (if it is useful)
    > 2) On motherboard I have to add two Canopus cards:
    > Canopus NX PCI Express and expansion Kit
    > 3) One SSD INTEL X25-M POSTVILLE 80GB for OS, 2 WD CAVIAR BLACK 1TB
    > CAD. SATA 3 iwith RAID0 for videoediting and 2 hard disk iwith RAID0
    > for export video files.
    >
    > Could you seggest the right components so that I will not spend waste
    > of money, please?
    > Thanks a lot!!
    >


    Your Canopus NX might need a couple PCI Express x1 slots. The main
    card is a bit thick, but looks like it fits in a single slot width.

    http://www.adorama.com/images/Large/VDCAEMDNBV5_1.jpg

    As for slot placement, say we started with a P67 board (Asus P8P67 Deluxe LGA 1155 Intel P67)
    I put the Canopus cards relatively near each other, because I don't know
    how long the I/O cable is between them. The video card was placed in the
    second slot, to make it easier to cool. A high end card, if you
    own one some day, will need room. (I didn't pick a video card for
    you, in this posting. You may even be able to reuse the PCI Express
    video card you already own.)

    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-131-679-Z03?$S640W$

    Canopux NX (master card, x1 slot, sandwich card design)

    Video card x16 connector (empty)

    Canopus NX I/O card (x1 slot)

    PCI slot - use for sound card if you want to reuse your old card

    Video card x16 connector, runs at x8, card may be double slot in thickness

    PCI slot (empty, due to video card width)

    PCI Express slot x4 wiring (empty, may not be a usable slot due to the video card)

    *******

    P67 and H67 chips have two SATA III ports and four SATA II ports.
    To gain additional ports, they have to add chips to the motherboard.

    The P8P67 Deluxe has a total of ten ports, which means four
    of the ports come from two additional chips.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131679

    SATA III (Marvell 9128) \____ Empty for now, not necessary for a hard drive
    SATA III (Marvell 9128) / These are internal ports.

    SATA III ---- SSD INTEL X25-M POSTVILLE 80GB for OS
    SATA III ---- (Unused, suitable for SSD)
    SATA II ---- \___ Pair of WD Caviar black 1TB in RAID 0
    SATA II ---- / Should run at full rate
    SATA II ---- (Unused)
    SATA II ---- (Unused)

    (ESATA on I/O plate) JMB362 chip \___ ESATA external drives
    (ESATA on I/O plate) JMB362 chip / ESATA external drives

    *******

    The P8P67 Deluxe comes with a front mounted USB3 tray, so you can
    have USB3 connectors on the front of the computer. But there is
    no provision for making ESATA on the front too. ESATA is only on the
    rear of the computer.

    http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-131-679-Z05?$S640W$

    *******

    I'm just learning about Sandy Bridge today, so I don't know very much
    about it. That's why I wanted _you_ to select the motherboard :)

    The Anandtech article, says setting up a system with "Quick Sync",
    interferes with overclocking. Each platform (H67 versus P67), differs
    in what it can give you. H67 is part of built-in graphics support, and
    will do the "Quick Sync" transcoding of video (because the Intel built-in
    GPU will be turned on). But P67 allows whatever limited overclocking
    options are available (overclocking by setting multiplier). Since you're
    a "video guy", if you wish to experiment with the "Quick Sync" marketing
    gimmick, then you'll buy an H67 motherboard. But the H67 motherboards,
    tend to be poorly outfitted with I/O connectors and slots. That is why,
    in the example motherboard above, I selected a P67 motherboard,
    since it has better connections for the hard drives.

    In other words, it is *hard* to buy an ideal motherboard. At this point,
    I am favoring P67 based motherboards for you, because they have the
    interconnect you need. The QuickSync would be fun to play with,
    for video transcoding, but if you bought an H67 based motherboard,
    it would not be as good a motherboard for your "main video editing
    workstation".

    This is about the best H67 I could find, but it only has one ESATA
    on the back. This would do QuickSync video transcoding, has room
    for your Canopus, and offers the following storage ports. Storage
    is controlled by the Southbridge, and this board has no added
    chips for storage.

    "GIGABYTE GA-H67A-UD3H LGA 1155 Intel H67 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX"
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128461

    SATA III ---- SSD INTEL X25-M POSTVILLE 80GB for OS
    SATA III ---- (Unused)
    SATA II ---- \___ Pair of WD Caviar black 1TB in RAID 0
    SATA II ---- / Should run at full rate
    SATA II ---- (Unused)

    ESATA II ---- On the back, for a single drive.

    One reason I could not review more Asus motherboards as prospective
    purchases, is the PDF manuals are not available for download!!!
    The EVO board looked interesting, but there was no manual, and
    I couldn't even find labels for all the ports. The thing is,
    Asus would have sent the manuals to the printer, to be printed
    into booklets, weeks ago. There is NO excuse for the manual
    to be missing. It was finished a long time ago.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Jan 11, 2011
    #10
  11. Guest

    Paul, wonderful post, I thank you very very much.
    A last question please. I don't understand if with "Quick Sync" option
    is it possible to skip the videocard. With "Quick Sync"do i need to
    add a videocard into my new PC?
    I know is shipping Asus Maximus IV Extreme, do you know it? May be it
    is too much for me. ;)
    Thanks again




    >> I have noticed you know very fine the matter. I'm an inexperienced guy
    >> compared to you. ;)
    >> Can you give me other your suggestions please?
    >> I'd like to assemble a new workstation with i72600k Sandy Bridge.
    >> My video editing will be with AVCHD files (heavy).
    >> I post my config and I hope you can verify it:
    >>
    >> 1) I'd like a light overlocking (if it is useful)
    >> 2) On motherboard I have to add two Canopus cards:
    >> Canopus NX PCI Express and expansion Kit
    >> 3) One SSD INTEL X25-M POSTVILLE 80GB for OS, 2 WD CAVIAR BLACK 1TB
    >> CAD. SATA 3 iwith RAID0 for videoediting and 2 hard disk iwith RAID0
    >> for export video files.
    >>
    >> Could you seggest the right components so that I will not spend waste
    >> of money, please?
    >> Thanks a lot!!
    >>

    >
    >Your Canopus NX might need a couple PCI Express x1 slots. The main
    >card is a bit thick, but looks like it fits in a single slot width.
    >
    >http://www.adorama.com/images/Large/VDCAEMDNBV5_1.jpg
    >
    >As for slot placement, say we started with a P67 board (Asus P8P67 Deluxe LGA 1155 Intel P67)
    >I put the Canopus cards relatively near each other, because I don't know
    >how long the I/O cable is between them. The video card was placed in the
    >second slot, to make it easier to cool. A high end card, if you
    >own one some day, will need room. (I didn't pick a video card for
    >you, in this posting. You may even be able to reuse the PCI Express
    >video card you already own.)
    >
    >http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-131-679-Z03?$S640W$
    >
    > Canopux NX (master card, x1 slot, sandwich card design)
    >
    > Video card x16 connector (empty)
    >
    > Canopus NX I/O card (x1 slot)
    >
    > PCI slot - use for sound card if you want to reuse your old card
    >
    > Video card x16 connector, runs at x8, card may be double slot in thickness
    >
    > PCI slot (empty, due to video card width)
    >
    > PCI Express slot x4 wiring (empty, may not be a usable slot due to the video card)
    >
    >*******
    >
    >P67 and H67 chips have two SATA III ports and four SATA II ports.
    >To gain additional ports, they have to add chips to the motherboard.
    >
    >The P8P67 Deluxe has a total of ten ports, which means four
    >of the ports come from two additional chips.
    >
    >http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131679
    >
    > SATA III (Marvell 9128) \____ Empty for now, not necessary for a hard drive
    > SATA III (Marvell 9128) / These are internal ports.
    >
    > SATA III ---- SSD INTEL X25-M POSTVILLE 80GB for OS
    > SATA III ---- (Unused, suitable for SSD)
    > SATA II ---- \___ Pair of WD Caviar black 1TB in RAID 0
    > SATA II ---- / Should run at full rate
    > SATA II ---- (Unused)
    > SATA II ---- (Unused)
    >
    > (ESATA on I/O plate) JMB362 chip \___ ESATA external drives
    > (ESATA on I/O plate) JMB362 chip / ESATA external drives
    >
    >*******
    >
    >The P8P67 Deluxe comes with a front mounted USB3 tray, so you can
    >have USB3 connectors on the front of the computer. But there is
    >no provision for making ESATA on the front too. ESATA is only on the
    >rear of the computer.
    >
    >http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/13-131-679-Z05?$S640W$
    >
    >*******
    >
    >I'm just learning about Sandy Bridge today, so I don't know very much
    >about it. That's why I wanted _you_ to select the motherboard :)
    >
    >The Anandtech article, says setting up a system with "Quick Sync",
    >interferes with overclocking. Each platform (H67 versus P67), differs
    >in what it can give you. H67 is part of built-in graphics support, and
    >will do the "Quick Sync" transcoding of video (because the Intel built-in
    >GPU will be turned on). But P67 allows whatever limited overclocking
    >options are available (overclocking by setting multiplier). Since you're
    >a "video guy", if you wish to experiment with the "Quick Sync" marketing
    >gimmick, then you'll buy an H67 motherboard. But the H67 motherboards,
    >tend to be poorly outfitted with I/O connectors and slots. That is why,
    >in the example motherboard above, I selected a P67 motherboard,
    >since it has better connections for the hard drives.
    >
    >In other words, it is *hard* to buy an ideal motherboard. At this point,
    >I am favoring P67 based motherboards for you, because they have the
    >interconnect you need. The QuickSync would be fun to play with,
    >for video transcoding, but if you bought an H67 based motherboard,
    >it would not be as good a motherboard for your "main video editing
    >workstation".
    >
    >This is about the best H67 I could find, but it only has one ESATA
    >on the back. This would do QuickSync video transcoding, has room
    >for your Canopus, and offers the following storage ports. Storage
    >is controlled by the Southbridge, and this board has no added
    >chips for storage.
    >
    >"GIGABYTE GA-H67A-UD3H LGA 1155 Intel H67 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX"
    >http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128461
    >
    > SATA III ---- SSD INTEL X25-M POSTVILLE 80GB for OS
    > SATA III ---- (Unused)
    > SATA II ---- \___ Pair of WD Caviar black 1TB in RAID 0
    > SATA II ---- / Should run at full rate
    > SATA II ---- (Unused)
    >
    > ESATA II ---- On the back, for a single drive.
    >
    >One reason I could not review more Asus motherboards as prospective
    >purchases, is the PDF manuals are not available for download!!!
    >The EVO board looked interesting, but there was no manual, and
    >I couldn't even find labels for all the ports. The thing is,
    >Asus would have sent the manuals to the printer, to be printed
    >into booklets, weeks ago. There is NO excuse for the manual
    >to be missing. It was finished a long time ago.
    >
    >HTH,
    > Paul
    >
    >
    >
     
    , Jan 11, 2011
    #11
  12. Paul Guest

    wrote:
    > Paul, wonderful post, I thank you very very much.
    > A last question please. I don't understand if with "Quick Sync" option
    > is it possible to skip the videocard. With "Quick Sync"do i need to
    > add a videocard into my new PC?
    > I know is shipping Asus Maximus IV Extreme, do you know it? May be it
    > is too much for me. ;)
    > Thanks again


    OK, to review how it works, first we'll connect Sandy Bridge to H67.

    Sandy Bridge
    2600K
    (has GPU inside)
    | |
    | FDI | DMI
    | bus | bus
    | |
    HDMI, DVI, ----- H67 Chipset
    DisplayPort

    When the processor is connected to H67, it means there is a path
    for the GPU to display the build-in video. You don't need a video
    card in that case, because the computer has the built-in video,
    and the back of the motherboard has video connectors.

    Now, by connecting up the GPU, it also enabled the EU blocks which
    are used to transcode video. Intel has decided to tie the functions
    together. To use the EU blocks, you have to turn on the GPU and
    graphics features. At least, for the moment.

    http://images.anandtech.com/reviews/cpu/intel/sandybridge/review/videodecode1_Sm.jpg

    In the middle of 2011, Anandtech says a new chipset, called Z68,
    will solve this problem. So when June shows up, there will be
    H67, P67, and Z68 based motherboards. The ideal motherboard
    for you, at that point in time, would be Z68. The other two
    chipsets, don't give a person doing video, the ideal solution.
    There are compromises with H67 and P67.

    If you use the P67 motherboard, it looks like this. The GPU is
    not connected to any video output. A side effect of this, is
    the EU blocks in the GPU are disabled, so you can't run
    QuickSync. Intel is doing that for an arbitrary reason -
    as far as I'm concerned, it should be possible to use
    those blocks, even if the connection is cut. The connection
    only connects the output crossbar to the outside world -
    it should be possible to still use the EU blocks for
    transcoding video, but it doesn't appear it's set up that
    way. If you use P67 chipset, you have to buy a video card
    (even a $32 card will do).

    Sandy Bridge
    2600K
    (has GPU inside)
    | |
    | FDI | DMI
    | bus | bus
    x |
    |
    |
    P67 Chipset

    I selected a P67 motherboard, because I can get plenty of
    SATA III, USB3, add-in slots on the motherboard and so on.

    If I select a H67 motherboard, so the Quick Sync transcoder
    can work, then I have fewer ports for hard drives and so on.
    H67 motherboards aren't as full-featured as P67. Intel did
    not think this through very carefully, and neither it seems,
    did the motherboard manufacturers. We need the motherboard
    manufacturer, to build a "full featured" H67.

    This is the best H67 I could find. And it needs more storage
    (SATA/ESATA) interfaces.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128461

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jan 12, 2011
    #12
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