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What chemical to clean clogged inkjet printhead?

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by Max -, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. Max -

    Max - Guest

    What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy on the
    high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP injet printer?

    Isopropanol?
    Ethanol?
    Dry-cleaning fluid?
    Ammonia?
    Distilled water?

    There seem to be several proprietary solutions on the market but I
    can't work out what they contain.
     
    Max -, Jul 28, 2004
    #1
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  2. Max -

    Mike Walsh Guest

    I don't know about HP printers, because if you replace the ink cartridge you will get a new print head. On Epsons I have had best results with water (water soluble ink).

    Max - wrote:
    >
    > What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy on the
    > high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP injet printer?
    >
    > Isopropanol?
    > Ethanol?
    > Dry-cleaning fluid?
    > Ammonia?
    > Distilled water?
    >
    > There seem to be several proprietary solutions on the market but I
    > can't work out what they contain.


    --

    When replying by Email include NewSGrouP (case sensitive) in Subject

    Mike Walsh
    West Palm Beach, Florida, U.S.A.
     
    Mike Walsh, Jul 28, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Max -

    Noozer Guest

    Ammonia.. Try windex.

    "Max -" <> wrote in message
    news:9534BB111A98061M2A@127.0.0.1...
    > What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy on the
    > high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP injet printer?
    >
    > Isopropanol?
    > Ethanol?
    > Dry-cleaning fluid?
    > Ammonia?
    > Distilled water?
    >
    > There seem to be several proprietary solutions on the market but I
    > can't work out what they contain.
     
    Noozer, Jul 28, 2004
    #3
  4. Max -

    OCZ Guy Guest

    Just dunk it in some hot water for a few minutes, just the cloged bit
    not the whole thing :)

    And bang it alittle on towel repeat, will be fixed in NO time, thats
    how i do it.



    On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 17:41:24 GMT, "Noozer" <> wrote:

    >Ammonia.. Try windex.
    >
    >"Max -" <> wrote in message
    >news:9534BB111A98061M2A@127.0.0.1...
    >> What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy on the
    >> high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP injet printer?
    >>
    >> Isopropanol?
    >> Ethanol?
    >> Dry-cleaning fluid?
    >> Ammonia?
    >> Distilled water?
    >>
    >> There seem to be several proprietary solutions on the market but I
    >> can't work out what they contain.

    >
     
    OCZ Guy, Jul 28, 2004
    #4
  5. Max -

    kony Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 18:23:21 +0100, "Max -"
    <> wrote:

    >What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy on the
    >high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP injet printer?
    >
    >Isopropanol?
    >Ethanol?
    >Dry-cleaning fluid?
    >Ammonia?
    >Distilled water?
    >
    >There seem to be several proprietary solutions on the market but I
    >can't work out what they contain.


    Distilled water, half-dozen percent ammonia (give or take), and a
    couple drops of detergent (NOT "soap"). Warm it up and soak,
    take out print head and wipe off electical contacts but not
    bottom... install in printer while bottom is still wet and do the
    head-cleaning routine, just be sure there's ink in cartridge,
    that it's not too dried out as cause of problem.
     
    kony, Jul 28, 2004
    #5
  6. Max -

    Peter Duck Guest

    In message <>
    OCZ Guy <> wrote:

    > >> What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy on the
    > >> high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP injet printer? ...


    > Just dunk it in some hot water for a few minutes, just the cloged bit
    > not the whole thing :)


    > And bang it alittle on towel repeat, will be fixed in NO time, thats
    > how i do it.


    That's often worked for me, but not indefinitely: I understand that
    there's a 'microfilter' in some or all HP cartridges between reservoir
    and print-head - if that eventually gets clogged, even boiling the
    output end doesn't unblock it (nor does ammonia/'cleaning fluid',
    externally applied)

    --
    Peter Duck <>
     
    Peter Duck, Jul 28, 2004
    #6
  7. Max -

    *Vanguard* Guest

    "Max -" <>
    wrote in news:9534BB111A98061M2A@127.0.0.1:
    > What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy on the
    > high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP injet printer?
    >
    > Isopropanol?


    Yes. It contains distilled water to eliminate minerals and it
    evaporates quickly. It does leave behind a misty white film usually
    invisible to the naked eye but disasterous for cleaning high power
    lasers because of refraction, but this isn't a problem on an inkjet
    cartridge.

    > Ethanol?


    Definitely not. It will leave behind a residue. Just because it is
    considered a clean-burning fuel doesn't make it a clean solvent.
    Corrosive to some plastics.

    > Dry-cleaning fluid?


    Perchloroethylene (aka PERC and tetrachloroethylene), a chlorinated
    solvent, can be destructive to some plastics. Before PERC, kerosene was
    used for "dry" cleaning (i.e., near absence of water). It is a strong
    degreaser. One ounce of PERC released directly into water can
    contaminate nearly 2-1/2 million gallons of water above regulatory
    concentrations. It can dissolve paint, glue, grease, wax, and oil but
    just use water on a water-soluble ink.

    > Ammonia?


    Windex leaves behind a residue (but probably not enough to worry about
    regarding an inkjet cartridge) and why you have to buff the residues
    (glycols) to eliminate streaks (see
    http://www.windexglasscleaner.com/faqs.asp#1) whereas letting it dry
    from wet strokes will leave streaks despite the use of surfactants.
    Just because you can't see it doesn't mean it ain't there. There is
    window wax, too, and if applied properly is unseen but it is definitely
    there. If it's all you have (unlikely) then use Windex but remember
    that it is a general purpose cleaner and may "clean" more than you want.
    For example, don't use on CRTs or LCDs or you may lose the
    anti-reflective coating and first test on an inconspicuous small area
    for tinted windows. Windex is: ammonia (emulsifier), 2-Butoxyethanol
    (surface coating solvent and degreaser, or dissolution promoter, also
    used in pesticides), Ethylene glycol hexyl ether (a solvent in the
    commercial version only), isopropyl alcohol, and 60-100% water. Water
    is neutral at a pH of 7, seawater is 8, and oven cleaners are 13.
    Ammonia is pH of 11, or 10,000 more alkaline than water (pH is
    exponential).

    Don't use ammonia; it's too corrosive and can make plastic go cloudy.
    Windex has ammonia (unless you get the vinegar or orange formulas). If
    the dried ink is too stubborn for distilled water or isopropyl alchol,
    use diluted white vinegar or purer acetic acid (a descaler) and follow
    by cleaning with distilled water (to eliminate the vinegar residue).

    > Distilled water?


    Yes. The ink is water soluable. This is what HP recommends. Use this
    first unless the dried ink is too stubborn and needs isopropyl to
    dissolve it.

    > There seem to be several proprietary solutions on the market but I
    > can't work out what they contain.


    Most are just very diluted isopropyl alcohol in deionized water. They
    don't list ingredients because they know you could make your own for far
    cheaper. Car engine cleaners also include isopropyl alcohol but you
    could by 99% isopropyl at the drug store and get 50 times more than what
    is in the car cleaner. Would you buy 50 bottles of the $1 gas
    evaporator/injector cleaner which is kerosene, Stoddard solvent (aka
    Naphtha, Mineral Spirits), and a tiny bit of isopropyl for a total cost
    of $50, or would you buy just a $3 bottle of 99% isopropyl?

    You should run a test page at least once a month to prevent the ink from
    drying up in the nozzle (aka an ink plug). This can use up a lot of
    ink, though. Even if you don't use the printer, the ink will dry up in
    the sponge inside the cartridge because vents are open to displace the
    ink that runs out. Don't remove the labels since they may cover more
    vent holes that are used at the factory when filling the cartridge. If
    you don't plan to use your printer for a long while, put the cartridge
    in a plastic bag.

    --
    __________________________________________________
    *** Post replies to newsgroup. Share with others.
    (E-mail: domain = ".com", add "=NEWS=" to Subject)
    __________________________________________________
     
    *Vanguard*, Jul 29, 2004
    #7
  8. Max -

    Franky Guest

    Nice post.


    "*Vanguard*" <do-not-email@reply-to-group> wrote:

    > "Max -" <>
    > wrote in news:9534BB111A98061M2A@127.0.0.1:
    >> What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy
    >> on the high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP
    >> injet printer?
    >>
    >> Isopropanol?

    >
    > Yes. It contains distilled water to eliminate minerals and it
    > evaporates quickly. It does leave behind a misty white film
    > usually invisible to the naked eye but disasterous for
    > cleaning high power lasers because of refraction, but this
    > isn't a problem on an inkjet cartridge.
    >
    >> Ethanol?

    >
    > Definitely not. It will leave behind a residue. Just because
    > it is considered a clean-burning fuel doesn't make it a clean
    > solvent. Corrosive to some plastics.
    >
    >> Dry-cleaning fluid?

    >
    > Perchloroethylene (aka PERC and tetrachloroethylene), a
    > chlorinated solvent, can be destructive to some plastics.
    > Before PERC, kerosene was used for "dry" cleaning (i.e., near
    > absence of water). It is a strong degreaser. One ounce of
    > PERC released directly into water can contaminate nearly 2-1/2
    > million gallons of water above regulatory concentrations. It
    > can dissolve paint, glue, grease, wax, and oil but just use
    > water on a water-soluble ink.
    >
    >> Ammonia?

    >
    > Windex leaves behind a residue (but probably not enough to
    > worry about regarding an inkjet cartridge) and why you have to
    > buff the residues (glycols) to eliminate streaks (see
    > http://www.windexglasscleaner.com/faqs.asp#1) whereas letting
    > it dry from wet strokes will leave streaks despite the use of
    > surfactants. Just because you can't see it doesn't mean it
    > ain't there. There is window wax, too, and if applied
    > properly is unseen but it is definitely there. If it's all
    > you have (unlikely) then use Windex but remember that it is a
    > general purpose cleaner and may "clean" more than you want.
    > For example, don't use on CRTs or LCDs or you may lose the
    > anti-reflective coating and first test on an inconspicuous
    > small area for tinted windows. Windex is: ammonia
    > (emulsifier), 2-Butoxyethanol (surface coating solvent and
    > degreaser, or dissolution promoter, also used in pesticides),
    > Ethylene glycol hexyl ether (a solvent in the commercial
    > version only), isopropyl alcohol, and 60-100% water. Water
    > is neutral at a pH of 7, seawater is 8, and oven cleaners are
    > 13. Ammonia is pH of 11, or 10,000 more alkaline than water
    > (pH is exponential).
    >
    > Don't use ammonia; it's too corrosive and can make plastic go
    > cloudy. Windex has ammonia (unless you get the vinegar or
    > orange formulas). If the dried ink is too stubborn for
    > distilled water or isopropyl alchol, use diluted white vinegar
    > or purer acetic acid (a descaler) and follow by cleaning with
    > distilled water (to eliminate the vinegar residue).
    >
    >> Distilled water?

    >
    > Yes. The ink is water soluable. This is what HP recommends.
    > Use this first unless the dried ink is too stubborn and needs
    > isopropyl to dissolve it.
    >
    >> There seem to be several proprietary solutions on the market
    >> but I can't work out what they contain.

    >
    > Most are just very diluted isopropyl alcohol in deionized
    > water. They don't list ingredients because they know you
    > could make your own for far cheaper. Car engine cleaners also
    > include isopropyl alcohol but you could by 99% isopropyl at
    > the drug store and get 50 times more than what is in the car
    > cleaner. Would you buy 50 bottles of the $1 gas
    > evaporator/injector cleaner which is kerosene, Stoddard
    > solvent (aka Naphtha, Mineral Spirits), and a tiny bit of
    > isopropyl for a total cost of $50, or would you buy just a $3
    > bottle of 99% isopropyl?
    >
    > You should run a test page at least once a month to prevent
    > the ink from drying up in the nozzle (aka an ink plug). This
    > can use up a lot of ink, though. Even if you don't use the
    > printer, the ink will dry up in the sponge inside the
    > cartridge because vents are open to displace the ink that runs
    > out. Don't remove the labels since they may cover more vent
    > holes that are used at the factory when filling the cartridge.
    > If you don't plan to use your printer for a long while, put
    > the cartridge in a plastic bag.
    >
     
    Franky, Jul 29, 2004
    #8
  9. Max -

    Todd Brooks Guest

    Yes, I too am impressed.

    --

    "Franky" <> wrote in message
    news:95352F90CE5D431E75@127.0.0.1...
    > Nice post.
    >
    >
    > "*Vanguard*" <do-not-email@reply-to-group> wrote:
    >
    > > "Max -" <>
    > > wrote in news:9534BB111A98061M2A@127.0.0.1:
    > >> What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy
    > >> on the high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP
    > >> injet printer?
    > >>
    > >> Isopropanol?

    > >
    > > Yes. It contains distilled water to eliminate minerals and it
    > > evaporates quickly. It does leave behind a misty white film
    > > usually invisible to the naked eye but disasterous for
    > > cleaning high power lasers because of refraction, but this
    > > isn't a problem on an inkjet cartridge.
    > >
    > >> Ethanol?

    > >
    > > Definitely not. It will leave behind a residue. Just because
    > > it is considered a clean-burning fuel doesn't make it a clean
    > > solvent. Corrosive to some plastics.
    > >
    > >> Dry-cleaning fluid?

    > >
    > > Perchloroethylene (aka PERC and tetrachloroethylene), a
    > > chlorinated solvent, can be destructive to some plastics.
    > > Before PERC, kerosene was used for "dry" cleaning (i.e., near
    > > absence of water). It is a strong degreaser. One ounce of
    > > PERC released directly into water can contaminate nearly 2-1/2
    > > million gallons of water above regulatory concentrations. It
    > > can dissolve paint, glue, grease, wax, and oil but just use
    > > water on a water-soluble ink.
    > >
    > >> Ammonia?

    > >
    > > Windex leaves behind a residue (but probably not enough to
    > > worry about regarding an inkjet cartridge) and why you have to
    > > buff the residues (glycols) to eliminate streaks (see
    > > http://www.windexglasscleaner.com/faqs.asp#1) whereas letting
    > > it dry from wet strokes will leave streaks despite the use of
    > > surfactants. Just because you can't see it doesn't mean it
    > > ain't there. There is window wax, too, and if applied
    > > properly is unseen but it is definitely there. If it's all
    > > you have (unlikely) then use Windex but remember that it is a
    > > general purpose cleaner and may "clean" more than you want.
    > > For example, don't use on CRTs or LCDs or you may lose the
    > > anti-reflective coating and first test on an inconspicuous
    > > small area for tinted windows. Windex is: ammonia
    > > (emulsifier), 2-Butoxyethanol (surface coating solvent and
    > > degreaser, or dissolution promoter, also used in pesticides),
    > > Ethylene glycol hexyl ether (a solvent in the commercial
    > > version only), isopropyl alcohol, and 60-100% water. Water
    > > is neutral at a pH of 7, seawater is 8, and oven cleaners are
    > > 13. Ammonia is pH of 11, or 10,000 more alkaline than water
    > > (pH is exponential).
    > >
    > > Don't use ammonia; it's too corrosive and can make plastic go
    > > cloudy. Windex has ammonia (unless you get the vinegar or
    > > orange formulas). If the dried ink is too stubborn for
    > > distilled water or isopropyl alchol, use diluted white vinegar
    > > or purer acetic acid (a descaler) and follow by cleaning with
    > > distilled water (to eliminate the vinegar residue).
    > >
    > >> Distilled water?

    > >
    > > Yes. The ink is water soluable. This is what HP recommends.
    > > Use this first unless the dried ink is too stubborn and needs
    > > isopropyl to dissolve it.
    > >
    > >> There seem to be several proprietary solutions on the market
    > >> but I can't work out what they contain.

    > >
    > > Most are just very diluted isopropyl alcohol in deionized
    > > water. They don't list ingredients because they know you
    > > could make your own for far cheaper. Car engine cleaners also
    > > include isopropyl alcohol but you could by 99% isopropyl at
    > > the drug store and get 50 times more than what is in the car
    > > cleaner. Would you buy 50 bottles of the $1 gas
    > > evaporator/injector cleaner which is kerosene, Stoddard
    > > solvent (aka Naphtha, Mineral Spirits), and a tiny bit of
    > > isopropyl for a total cost of $50, or would you buy just a $3
    > > bottle of 99% isopropyl?
    > >
    > > You should run a test page at least once a month to prevent
    > > the ink from drying up in the nozzle (aka an ink plug). This
    > > can use up a lot of ink, though. Even if you don't use the
    > > printer, the ink will dry up in the sponge inside the
    > > cartridge because vents are open to displace the ink that runs
    > > out. Don't remove the labels since they may cover more vent
    > > holes that are used at the factory when filling the cartridge.
    > > If you don't plan to use your printer for a long while, put
    > > the cartridge in a plastic bag.
    > >

    >
     
    Todd Brooks, Jul 29, 2004
    #9
  10. Max -

    *Vanguard* Guest

    "Todd Brooks" <>
    wrote in news::
    > Yes, I too am impressed.
    >
    >
    > "Franky" <> wrote in message
    > news:95352F90CE5D431E75@127.0.0.1...
    >> Nice post.
    >>
    >>
    >> "*Vanguard*" <do-not-email@reply-to-group> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Max -" <>
    >>> wrote in news:9534BB111A98061M2A@127.0.0.1:
    >>>> What is the best chemical to use (preferably that I can buy
    >>>> on the high street) to clean a clogged printhead on a HP
    >>>> injet printer?
    >>>>
    >>>> Isopropanol?
    >>>
    >>> Yes. It contains distilled water to eliminate minerals and it
    >>> evaporates quickly. It does leave behind a misty white film
    >>> usually invisible to the naked eye but disasterous for
    >>> cleaning high power lasers because of refraction, but this
    >>> isn't a problem on an inkjet cartridge.
    >>>
    >>>> Ethanol?
    >>>
    >>> Definitely not. It will leave behind a residue. Just because
    >>> it is considered a clean-burning fuel doesn't make it a clean
    >>> solvent. Corrosive to some plastics.
    >>>
    >>>> Dry-cleaning fluid?
    >>>
    >>> Perchloroethylene (aka PERC and tetrachloroethylene), a
    >>> chlorinated solvent, can be destructive to some plastics.
    >>> Before PERC, kerosene was used for "dry" cleaning (i.e., near
    >>> absence of water). It is a strong degreaser. One ounce of
    >>> PERC released directly into water can contaminate nearly 2-1/2
    >>> million gallons of water above regulatory concentrations. It
    >>> can dissolve paint, glue, grease, wax, and oil but just use
    >>> water on a water-soluble ink.
    >>>
    >>>> Ammonia?
    >>>
    >>> Windex leaves behind a residue (but probably not enough to
    >>> worry about regarding an inkjet cartridge) and why you have to
    >>> buff the residues (glycols) to eliminate streaks (see
    >>> http://www.windexglasscleaner.com/faqs.asp#1) whereas letting
    >>> it dry from wet strokes will leave streaks despite the use of
    >>> surfactants. Just because you can't see it doesn't mean it
    >>> ain't there. There is window wax, too, and if applied
    >>> properly is unseen but it is definitely there. If it's all
    >>> you have (unlikely) then use Windex but remember that it is a
    >>> general purpose cleaner and may "clean" more than you want.
    >>> For example, don't use on CRTs or LCDs or you may lose the
    >>> anti-reflective coating and first test on an inconspicuous
    >>> small area for tinted windows. Windex is: ammonia
    >>> (emulsifier), 2-Butoxyethanol (surface coating solvent and
    >>> degreaser, or dissolution promoter, also used in pesticides),
    >>> Ethylene glycol hexyl ether (a solvent in the commercial
    >>> version only), isopropyl alcohol, and 60-100% water. Water
    >>> is neutral at a pH of 7, seawater is 8, and oven cleaners are
    >>> 13. Ammonia is pH of 11, or 10,000 more alkaline than water
    >>> (pH is exponential).
    >>>
    >>> Don't use ammonia; it's too corrosive and can make plastic go
    >>> cloudy. Windex has ammonia (unless you get the vinegar or
    >>> orange formulas). If the dried ink is too stubborn for
    >>> distilled water or isopropyl alchol, use diluted white vinegar
    >>> or purer acetic acid (a descaler) and follow by cleaning with
    >>> distilled water (to eliminate the vinegar residue).
    >>>
    >>>> Distilled water?
    >>>
    >>> Yes. The ink is water soluable. This is what HP recommends.
    >>> Use this first unless the dried ink is too stubborn and needs
    >>> isopropyl to dissolve it.
    >>>
    >>>> There seem to be several proprietary solutions on the market
    >>>> but I can't work out what they contain.
    >>>
    >>> Most are just very diluted isopropyl alcohol in deionized
    >>> water. They don't list ingredients because they know you
    >>> could make your own for far cheaper. Car engine cleaners also
    >>> include isopropyl alcohol but you could by 99% isopropyl at
    >>> the drug store and get 50 times more than what is in the car
    >>> cleaner. Would you buy 50 bottles of the $1 gas
    >>> evaporator/injector cleaner which is kerosene, Stoddard
    >>> solvent (aka Naphtha, Mineral Spirits), and a tiny bit of
    >>> isopropyl for a total cost of $50, or would you buy just a $3
    >>> bottle of 99% isopropyl?
    >>>
    >>> You should run a test page at least once a month to prevent
    >>> the ink from drying up in the nozzle (aka an ink plug). This
    >>> can use up a lot of ink, though. Even if you don't use the
    >>> printer, the ink will dry up in the sponge inside the
    >>> cartridge because vents are open to displace the ink that runs
    >>> out. Don't remove the labels since they may cover more vent
    >>> holes that are used at the factory when filling the cartridge.
    >>> If you don't plan to use your printer for a long while, put
    >>> the cartridge in a plastic bag.


    It actually started when trying to figure out what the hell is actually
    in Windex (which has several formulations) to figure out why it is more
    special than, say, using very diluted isopropyl alcohol and ammonia.
    What could the "D" in "Ammonia-D" was for? I see claims that Ammonia-D
    has 45% more grease-cutting power but more than what? Ammonia non-D?
    Ammonia-A, -B, or -C? Water? 145% of anything less than 100% means you
    are not getting 100% of the *rest* of the grease that didn't get
    cleaned. If you only got 90% before, 10% was left behind so 45% more of
    the 10% left behind is 4.5% so you would now get 94.5% and still leave
    behind 5.5% of the grease.

    Since "Ammonia-D" is trademarked by SC Johnson, I figured something of
    what it is might be mentioned in the trademark registration
    (http://www.uspto.gov/). Ammonia-D is registered to Drackett Co. way
    back in 1964. Drackett is the registrant whereas SC Johnson is the
    owner. However, there are no details as to WHAT got trademarked. A
    Google search turned up "Ammonia-D is a registered trademark for an
    exclusive glass cleaning formula." Well, then there is no such thing as
    *ammonia* type D, or such. It just means it is ammonia and some
    specific set of other ingredients in a formula of which the vast
    percentage is WATER! I guess the only way to know the formula is to
    read the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet). Change one ingredient or
    its percentage and we have Ammonia-X. Actually Ammonia-D has worked
    well for them so they have, for example, their institutional strength
    Ammonia-D but with "extra" ingredient(s); i.e., it's all Ammonia-D with
    something else.

    --
    __________________________________________________
    *** Post replies to newsgroup. Share with others.
    (E-mail: domain = ".com", add "=NEWS=" to Subject)
    __________________________________________________
     
    *Vanguard*, Jul 29, 2004
    #10
  11. Max -

    half_pint Guest

    Great resuls with tap water, or you can buy it bottled
    at 10,000 times the price.
     
    half_pint, Jul 29, 2004
    #11
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