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what do the bits tell me?

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by rb, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. rb

    rb Guest

    In the pc Ethernet cards, I see some that state 16 bit. Are there 32 bit
    ones, too? If so, what do you lose by using a 16 bit one as opposed to a 32
    bit one? Or, do some of the laptops limit Ethernet cards to 16 bits, while
    others allow 32 bits?
    rb, Feb 28, 2007
    #1
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  2. rb

    Guest

    On Feb 27, 6:46 pm, "rb" <> wrote:
    > In the pc Ethernet cards, I see some that state 16 bit. Are there 32 bit
    > ones, too?


    Yes.

    >If so, what do you lose by using a 16 bit one as opposed to a 32
    > bit one?


    Not much, it's a compatibility issue.

    > Or, do some of the laptops limit Ethernet cards to 16 bits, while
    > others allow 32 bits?


    Yes, and yes.


    If you provide us with the make and model of your laptop, we may be
    able to tell you which kind ethernet card is compatible.

    Many will accept both 16 and 32 bit cards. Some older ones can only
    accept 16bit.
    , Feb 28, 2007
    #2
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  3. This is the exact same post I sent to another thread on this board 12
    hours ago:

    With regard to PC Cards, the "type" (type 1, 2 and 3) only refers to the
    card thickness. Electrically, they are the same.

    There are two types of PC cards, 16-bit and 32-bit (32-bit cards are
    also known as "cardbus" cards ... same thing, just a different name).
    Laptops made after approximately 1997 (in the range of Pentium I 133MHz
    to 166MHz) will normally have 32-bit (cardbus) slots, which are
    backwards compatible and support 16-bit cards as well. A 16-bit card is
    the laptop equivalent of an ISA card, a 32-bit card is the laptop
    equivalent of a PCI card. Note that there is no connection between the
    thickness of a card (it's "type 1", "type 2" or "type 3" designation)
    and whether it's 16-bit or 32-bit.

    You can find the cards anywhere. There are probably thousands if not
    tens of thousands of them listed on E-Bay, there is an entire category
    for them (plus they show up in other categories as well). There are
    lots of PC Card sound cards.

    ****************

    With respect to an Ethernet card, either will work unless the laptop is
    truly ancient (about 1998 or earlier), a 32-bit card might be faster (on
    a 10 mbps network, it probably won't matter at all or much, but on a 100
    mbps network, the difference might be significant).

    rb wrote:
    > In the pc Ethernet cards, I see some that state 16 bit. Are there 32 bit
    > ones, too? If so, what do you lose by using a 16 bit one as opposed to a 32
    > bit one? Or, do some of the laptops limit Ethernet cards to 16 bits, while
    > others allow 32 bits?
    >
    >
    Barry Watzman, Feb 28, 2007
    #3
  4. The laptop would have to be truly ancient not to accept both 16 and
    32-bit PC Cards. Approximately, it would have to have been made in 1998
    or earlier, and likely it would have to be a Pentium [one] 166MHz or
    older. Anything more recent ... and even some older laptops ... should
    accept either type of card.


    wrote:
    > On Feb 27, 6:46 pm, "rb" <> wrote:
    >> In the pc Ethernet cards, I see some that state 16 bit. Are there 32 bit
    >> ones, too?

    >
    > Yes.
    >
    >> If so, what do you lose by using a 16 bit one as opposed to a 32
    >> bit one?

    >
    > Not much, it's a compatibility issue.
    >
    >> Or, do some of the laptops limit Ethernet cards to 16 bits, while
    >> others allow 32 bits?

    >
    > Yes, and yes.
    >
    >
    > If you provide us with the make and model of your laptop, we may be
    > able to tell you which kind ethernet card is compatible.
    >
    > Many will accept both 16 and 32 bit cards. Some older ones can only
    > accept 16bit.
    >
    >
    Barry Watzman, Feb 28, 2007
    #4
  5. rb

    Guest

    On Feb 27, 10:28 pm, Barry Watzman <> wrote:
    > The laptop would have to be truly ancient not to accept both 16 and
    > 32-bit PC Cards. Approximately, it would have to have been made in 1998
    > or earlier, and likely it would have to be a Pentium [one] 166MHz or
    > older. Anything more recent ... and even some older laptops ... should
    > accept either type of card.
    >


    I agree with that... it's just that LOTS of these truly ancient beasts
    are still in daily use.


    > wrote:
    > > On Feb 27, 6:46 pm, "rb" <> wrote:
    > >> In the pc Ethernet cards, I see some that state 16 bit. Are there 32 bit
    > >> ones, too?

    >
    > > Yes.

    >
    > >> If so, what do you lose by using a 16 bit one as opposed to a 32
    > >> bit one?

    >
    > > Not much, it's a compatibility issue.

    >
    > >> Or, do some of the laptops limit Ethernet cards to 16 bits, while
    > >> others allow 32 bits?

    >
    > > Yes, and yes.

    >
    > > If you provide us with the make and model of your laptop, we may be
    > > able to tell you which kind ethernet card is compatible.

    >
    > > Many will accept both 16 and 32 bit cards. Some older ones can only
    > > accept 16bit.
    , Feb 28, 2007
    #5
  6. rb

    rb Guest

    Mine is a Micron Trek 2. I know it can use the 16 bit cards, but not sure
    about 32 bit ones.
    rb, Mar 1, 2007
    #6
  7. rb

    Guest

    On Feb 28, 9:27 pm, "rb" <> wrote:
    > Mine is a Micron Trek 2. I know it can use the 16 bit cards, but not sure
    > about 32 bit ones.


    What little info I've found on this notebook suggests it's an Pentium
    2, circa around 1999. So it's probably safest to stick to the 16bit
    card. Keep in mind that there's little advantage to a 32bit card for
    your era notebook.

    The support site is here. Unfortunately you need a serial number to
    access the stuff. Which MIGHT (but not definitely) contain info on
    whether or not 32bit cards are supported.

    http://support.mpccorp.com/

    (yes, this is the right company)
    , Mar 1, 2007
    #7
  8. It must be truly ancient, as Micron hasn't made PC in a long, long time.
    What is the CPU? When was it made? I'd almost suspect that it's too
    old to be useful, even for your limited use. And that you may have paid
    way too much for it.


    rb wrote:
    > Mine is a Micron Trek 2. I know it can use the 16 bit cards, but not sure
    > about 32 bit ones.
    >
    >
    Barry Watzman, Mar 1, 2007
    #8
  9. Well, apparently it's a low-end Pentium II, in which case it's still
    somewhat usable, and it is virtually certain to support Cardbus (32-bit
    PC Cards).


    rb wrote:
    > Mine is a Micron Trek 2. I know it can use the 16 bit cards, but not sure
    > about 32 bit ones.
    >
    >
    Barry Watzman, Mar 1, 2007
    #9
  10. The transition from 16-bit only cards to 32-bit cards (which are
    normally backwards compatible) occured in about 1997 in the time of
    Pentium [one] 133 to 166MHz. Any Pentium II machine is almost certain
    to support Cardbus (32-bit cards).


    wrote:
    > On Feb 28, 9:27 pm, "rb" <> wrote:
    >> Mine is a Micron Trek 2. I know it can use the 16 bit cards, but not sure
    >> about 32 bit ones.

    >
    > What little info I've found on this notebook suggests it's an Pentium
    > 2, circa around 1999. So it's probably safest to stick to the 16bit
    > card. Keep in mind that there's little advantage to a 32bit card for
    > your era notebook.
    >
    > The support site is here. Unfortunately you need a serial number to
    > access the stuff. Which MIGHT (but not definitely) contain info on
    > whether or not 32bit cards are supported.
    >
    > http://support.mpccorp.com/
    >
    > (yes, this is the right company)
    >
    Barry Watzman, Mar 1, 2007
    #10
  11. rb

    Guest

    On Mar 1, 8:52 am, Barry Watzman <> wrote:
    > It must be truly ancient, as Micron hasn't made PC in a long, long time.
    > What is the CPU? When was it made? I'd almost suspect that it's too
    > old to be useful, even for your limited use. And that you may have paid
    > way too much for it.
    >
    > rb wrote:
    > > Mine is a Micron Trek 2. I know it can use the 16 bit cards, but not sure
    > > about 32 bit ones.


    Micron went away from building PCs for a while, but they're back,
    under the name MPC. I've seen a few around.
    , Mar 1, 2007
    #11
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