What job after a Mac career?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Geo, Jul 8, 2004.

  1. Geo

    Geo Guest

    I wonder, is there a job ideally suited for burned-out Mac admin/DTP
    guys who spent 20 years battling undocumented Mac bugs in the first
    trench?

    It's time to change a career when one doesn't give a damn about the
    latest innovation anymore instead of being excited by it. I must
    admit, after 20 years I have reached that low point, sadly. I keep
    daydreaming about a job that's low on error messages, something I
    don't have to relearn every 2 years. I guess I burned out.

    So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo and the
    ability to fully track and control 40 simultaneous processes? Should I
    start to train for a B747 pilot or airport radar operator at the age
    of 40?
     
    Geo, Jul 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Geo wrote:

    > So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    > computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo


    Become a consultant, and offer to hand-hold new OS X users,
    mainly windopes who decide to switch. But you'll still have to
    re-learn everything every year 8-(~
     
    George Williams, Jul 9, 2004
    #2
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  3. Geo

    Ian Gregory Guest

    Geo wrote:
    > I wonder, is there a job ideally suited for burned-out Mac admin/DTP
    > guys who spent 20 years battling undocumented Mac bugs in the first
    > trench?


    I am approximately in your shoes (same age, Solaris admin/Finite
    Element Analysis since late 80s) and am working on a plan with a
    few others to buy some land, grow our own food, run a retreat or
    something and generally chill out.

    > It's time to change a career when one doesn't give a damn about the
    > latest innovation anymore instead of being excited by it. I must
    > admit, after 20 years I have reached that low point, sadly. I keep
    > daydreaming about a job that's low on error messages, something I
    > don't have to relearn every 2 years. I guess I burned out.


    I often feel on the verge of burning out. I sometimes spend seriously
    unhealthy periods of time on the net and it all seems so important
    that I can't possibly waste time relaxing, there all these usenet
    posts which I simply *must* respond to.

    > So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    > computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo and the
    > ability to fully track and control 40 simultaneous processes? Should I
    > start to train for a B747 pilot or airport radar operator at the age
    > of 40?


    You have got to ask yourself why you have stuck it out so long. You
    may be addicted to being in the burnout zone. That is not necessarily
    a bad thing - specially if you think you are achieving something of
    value, be it financial reward or whatever. But could there be a better
    state? I am starting to think it is time to let the youngsters take
    over the geeky stuff.

    --
    Ian Gregory
    http://www.zenatode.org.uk/ian/
     
    Ian Gregory, Jul 9, 2004
    #3
  4. Geo

    Howard Shubs Guest

    In article <>,
    Geo <> wrote:

    > So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    > computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo and the
    > ability to fully track and control 40 simultaneous processes? Should I
    > start to train for a B747 pilot or airport radar operator at the age
    > of 40?


    If you find out, please let us know. The other system managers out here
    are interested. At least, I am.

    I used to know a woman who became a masusse afterwards.

    --
    Your prison is walking through this world all alone.
     
    Howard Shubs, Jul 9, 2004
    #4
  5. Geo

    Howard Shubs Guest

    In article <40edde4e$0$20523$>,
    Ian Gregory <> wrote:

    > You have got to ask yourself why you have stuck it out so long. You
    > may be addicted to being in the burnout zone. That is not necessarily
    > a bad thing - specially if you think you are achieving something of
    > value, be it financial reward or whatever. But could there be a better
    > state? I am starting to think it is time to let the youngsters take
    > over the geeky stuff.


    That means.... management. nooooooooooooooo!!!!!!

    --
    Your prison is walking through this world all alone.
     
    Howard Shubs, Jul 9, 2004
    #5
  6. Geo

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Geo wrote:
    > So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    > computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo and the
    > ability to fully track and control 40 simultaneous processes? Should I
    > start to train for a B747 pilot or airport radar operator at the age


    I'm training for Spanish teacher at the age of 50.
    How about it--do you think you can fully track and
    control 25-30 simultaneous adolescents?

    Or any other age group in some other subject?

    :)

    --
    Wes Groleau

    A UNIX signature isn't a return address, it's the ASCII equivalent
    of a black velvet clown painting. It's a rectangle of carets
    surrounding a quote from a literary giant of weeniedom like
    Heinlein or Dr. Who.
    -- Chris Maeda

    Ha, ha, Dr. ..... Who's Chris Maeda?
    -- Wes Groleau
     
    Wes Groleau, Jul 9, 2004
    #6
  7. Geo

    Howard Shubs Guest

    In article
    <2004070906450516807%exceptionsTakeThisOutDude@earthlinknet>,
    Mikey <> wrote:

    > I recommmend retraining immediately, so that you can be finished by the
    > time your $$ is drained. I didn't because I figured I'd find another
    > Mac job somehwere.


    Do you *like* Hospitality? Happiness can be more important than money.
    Make manager or whatever, or buy your own hotel, and make a mint?

    --
    Your prison is walking through this world all alone.
     
    Howard Shubs, Jul 9, 2004
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    Geo <> wrote:

    > So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    > computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo and the
    > ability to fully track and control 40 simultaneous processes? Should I
    > start to train for a B747 pilot or airport radar operator at the age
    > of 40?


    I'm on the airline career track right now, and believe me, you'll wish
    you'd stuck to computers when you realize how unstable a career move it
    is. May I suggest something *outside* aerospace. <grin>

    --
    Garner R. Miller
    Manchester, CT =USA=
     
    Garner Miller, Jul 9, 2004
    #8
  9. Geo

    Jason Guest

    In article <>,
    Geo <> wrote:

    > I wonder, is there a job ideally suited for burned-out Mac admin/DTP
    > guys who spent 20 years battling undocumented Mac bugs in the first
    > trench?
    >
    > It's time to change a career when one doesn't give a damn about the
    > latest innovation anymore instead of being excited by it. I must
    > admit, after 20 years I have reached that low point, sadly. I keep
    > daydreaming about a job that's low on error messages, something I
    > don't have to relearn every 2 years. I guess I burned out.
    >
    > So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    > computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo and the
    > ability to fully track and control 40 simultaneous processes? Should I
    > start to train for a B747 pilot or airport radar operator at the age
    > of 40?


    If there are no shops in town or your area of a big city--consider
    starting a mac related store. You could buy and sell older macs or even
    sell some new macs.
    However, most of your money would be made in the repair of macs. One local
    man done that and he had contracts with several businesses that had macs
    on a network. Those businesses paid him for being their network
    administrator or whatever the newest term happens to be. He told me the
    only thing he hated was that he had to work on computers that ran Windows.
    He recently retired.

    --
    NEWSGROUP SUBSCRIBERS MOTTO
    We respect those subscribers that ask for advice or provide advice.
    We do NOT respect the subscribers that enjoy criticizing people.
     
    Jason, Jul 9, 2004
    #9
  10. In article <>,
    Geo <> wrote:
    >I wonder, is there a job ideally suited for burned-out Mac admin/DTP
    >guys who spent 20 years battling undocumented Mac bugs in the first
    >trench?


    Wal*Mart greeter.
     
    Matthew Russotto, Jul 9, 2004
    #10
  11. In article <>,
    Howard Shubs <> wrote:
    >In article <40edde4e$0$20523$>,
    > Ian Gregory <> wrote:
    >
    >> You have got to ask yourself why you have stuck it out so long. You
    >> may be addicted to being in the burnout zone. That is not necessarily
    >> a bad thing - specially if you think you are achieving something of
    >> value, be it financial reward or whatever. But could there be a better
    >> state? I am starting to think it is time to let the youngsters take
    >> over the geeky stuff.

    >
    >That means.... management. nooooooooooooooo!!!!!!


    Yep. Time to head to Amazon for one last order (before you have a
    secretary to do it for you) -- a hair trimmer with conical
    attachments.
     
    Matthew Russotto, Jul 9, 2004
    #11
  12. In article <>,
    (Matthew Russotto) wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Geo <> wrote:
    > >I wonder, is there a job ideally suited for burned-out Mac admin/DTP
    > >guys who spent 20 years battling undocumented Mac bugs in the first
    > >trench?

    >
    > Wal*Mart greeter.


    Exterminator? You know, all that experience dealing with bugs...

    --
    Tom "Tom" Harrington
    Macaroni, Automated System Maintenance for Mac OS X.
    Version 2.0: Delocalize, Repair Permissions, lots more.
    See http://www.atomicbird.com/
     
    Tom Harrington, Jul 9, 2004
    #12
  13. Geo

    Howard Shubs Guest

    In article
    <2004070911363916807%exceptionsTakeThisOutDude@earthlinknet>,
    Mikey <> wrote:

    > .but at least I don't spend long nights banging away on some USB
    > driver, or fixing someone's bug, or something like that.


    And I bet your hotel has good "fast internet" service, too.

    --
    Your prison is walking through this world all alone.
     
    Howard Shubs, Jul 10, 2004
    #13
  14. Geo

    Earle Jones Guest

    In article
    <>,
    Geo <> wrote:

    > I wonder, is there a job ideally suited for burned-out Mac admin/DTP
    > guys who spent 20 years battling undocumented Mac bugs in the first
    > trench?
    >
    > It's time to change a career when one doesn't give a damn about the
    > latest innovation anymore instead of being excited by it. I must
    > admit, after 20 years I have reached that low point, sadly. I keep
    > daydreaming about a job that's low on error messages, something I
    > don't have to relearn every 2 years. I guess I burned out.
    >
    > So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    > computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo and the
    > ability to fully track and control 40 simultaneous processes? Should I
    > start to train for a B747 pilot or airport radar operator at the age
    > of 40?


    *
    Sounds like you need something simple and easy. How about opening a
    bar in Harlem and calling it "Whitey's"?

    earle
    *

    --
    __
    __/\_\
    /\_\/_/
    \/_/\_\ earle
    \/_/ jones
     
    Earle Jones, Jul 12, 2004
    #14
  15. Geo

    Davoud Guest

    Geo:
    > ...So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    > computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo and the
    > ability to fully track and control 40 simultaneous processes? Should I
    > start to train for a B747 pilot or airport radar operator at the age
    > of 40?


    *****

    Pope.

    Davoud
     
    Davoud, Jul 12, 2004
    #15
  16. Geo

    Geo Guest

    In article <>,
    Howard Shubs <> wrote:

    > I used to know a woman who became a masusse afterwards.


    I have a real gift for massage. My girlfriend loves me to death for
    the day-end sessions she gets. (She is just as good at it, but she is
    lazy to reciprocate :) Hmmm, came to think of it, I even mentioned it
    to her how we should train to become certified, licensed masseurs, the
    trade pays a decent $40-50/hr around here.

    My GF just couldn't picture me massaging some other woman. Why, when
    it's not sexual, I cannot fathom. Maybe I should harp a little more on
    this, see if I can warm her up to the idea. I'm really glad you
    reminded me of this possibility.

    > You have got to ask yourself why you have stuck it out so long.


    When I came to the US, that's what there was a demand for. For all I
    care I could have as well became a piano accompanist at the opera
    house, a photo lab printer, a licensed color copier repairman, a
    native Samoan wedding musician, a tile setter, a trilingual certified
    tour guide, a graphic designer, and many other positions I held at
    various times to full customer satisfaction. Whatever pays the bills...

    > but at least I don't spend long nights banging away on some USB
    > driver, or fixing someone's bug, or something like that.


    This resonated quite strongly here. Sounds like how I feel, exactly.
     
    Geo, Jul 12, 2004
    #16
  17. Geo

    wheat Guest

    Geo wrote:
    > I wonder, is there a job ideally suited for burned-out Mac admin/DTP
    > guys who spent 20 years battling undocumented Mac bugs in the first
    > trench?
    >

    [snip]
    > So... Is there a consensus, what's the best "next job" for veteran
    > computer wizards with deductive skills sharpened to the wazoo and the
    > ability to fully track and control 40 simultaneous processes? Should I
    > start to train for a B747 pilot or airport radar operator at the age
    > of 40?


    They say that you can never go back, but I disagree.

    One thing to consider is finding work that is finished at some point.
    For example, carpentry. Working the trades can be extremely satisfying
    as the fruits of one's labour are there to behold and when the job is
    done one can truly rest.
    If you find the company of your work mates a joy, then you can be happy
    while you train for career #2; if not, it is a fantastic motivation to
    train for career #2.

    cheers.
     
    wheat, Jul 13, 2004
    #17
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