Wireless Connection

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Tony, Mar 24, 2012.

  1. Tony

    Tony Guest

    My XPS 15 laptop can only connect to my router when the network is unhidden.
    I prefer to keep it hidden for security purposes. Is there a workaround
    this please?

    Tony
     
    Tony, Mar 24, 2012
    #1
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  2. Tony

    Brian K Guest

    Are you referring to the SSID?
     
    Brian K, Mar 24, 2012
    #2
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  3. Tony

    Tony Guest

    "Brian K" <> wrote in message
    news:AErbr.4840$...
    > Are you referring to the SSID?
    >


    Yes. I prefer to keep it hidden.
     
    Tony, Mar 25, 2012
    #3
  4. Tony

    Brian K Guest

    I don't bother hiding the SSID as it gives you no extra security. No-one is
    going to get past your WPA2 even if they sit outside your house for a few
    years.
     
    Brian K, Mar 26, 2012
    #4
  5. Tony

    Bob_Villa Guest

    On Monday, March 26, 2012 1:27:25 AM UTC-5, Brian K wrote:
    > I don't bother hiding the SSID as it gives you no extra security. No-one is
    > going to get past your WPA2 even if they sit outside your house for a few
    > years.


    I know my wireless only broadcasts around 75' outside the house. (With WPA2 also)
     
    Bob_Villa, Mar 26, 2012
    #5
  6. Tony

    Tony Guest

    "Bob_Villa" <> wrote in message
    news:15147644.212.1332758162491.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@ynjx8...
    > On Monday, March 26, 2012 1:27:25 AM UTC-5, Brian K wrote:
    >> I don't bother hiding the SSID as it gives you no extra security. No-one
    >> is
    >> going to get past your WPA2 even if they sit outside your house for a few
    >> years.

    >
    > I know my wireless only broadcasts around 75' outside the house. (With
    > WPA2 also)


    Thank you both for that reassurance. I'll stop hiding my SSID.
     
    Tony, Mar 26, 2012
    #6
  7. Tony

    RnR Guest

    On Mon, 26 Mar 2012 17:27:25 +1100, "Brian K"
    <> wrote:

    >I don't bother hiding the SSID as it gives you no extra security. No-one is
    >going to get past your WPA2 even if they sit outside your house for a few
    >years.
    >



    In theory NOT true but speaking in a practical sense, I agree.
    Unless one is paranoid, he's safe with WPA2 but there is free software
    to try to decrypt it. The problem is it takes a lot of cpu or time to
    do so and no one is going to bother unless they think it's worth the
    effort and have the money to buy multiple pc's to work on the
    decryption.
     
    RnR, Mar 27, 2012
    #7
  8. Tony

    BillW50 Guest

    "RnR" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 26 Mar 2012 17:27:25 +1100, "Brian K"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>I don't bother hiding the SSID as it gives you no extra security.
    >>No-one is
    >>going to get past your WPA2 even if they sit outside your house for a
    >>few
    >>years.

    >
    > In theory NOT true but speaking in a practical sense, I agree.
    > Unless one is paranoid, he's safe with WPA2 but there is free software
    > to try to decrypt it. The problem is it takes a lot of cpu or time to
    > do so and no one is going to bother unless they think it's worth the
    > effort and have the money to buy multiple pc's to work on the
    > decryption.


    I don't know if you have heard this before, but there was a hackers
    convention years ago in Las Vegas (or was it in Phoenix?), that hackers
    logged in on a stock WiFi for a new record of being 52 miles (50
    something anyway) away. Later I heard newer records being hundreds of
    miles away. Now where are these guys when I setup my WiFi? As I have a
    hard time pulling in mine just 600 feet away. lol

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Windows Live Mail 2009
    Centrino Core2 Duo T7400 2.16 GHz - 1.5GB - Windows 8 CP
     
    BillW50, Mar 27, 2012
    #8
  9. Tony

    RnR Guest

    On Tue, 27 Mar 2012 10:58:36 -0500, "BillW50" <> wrote:

    >
    >"RnR" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Mon, 26 Mar 2012 17:27:25 +1100, "Brian K"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I don't bother hiding the SSID as it gives you no extra security.
    >>>No-one is
    >>>going to get past your WPA2 even if they sit outside your house for a
    >>>few
    >>>years.

    >>
    >> In theory NOT true but speaking in a practical sense, I agree.
    >> Unless one is paranoid, he's safe with WPA2 but there is free software
    >> to try to decrypt it. The problem is it takes a lot of cpu or time to
    >> do so and no one is going to bother unless they think it's worth the
    >> effort and have the money to buy multiple pc's to work on the
    >> decryption.

    >
    >I don't know if you have heard this before, but there was a hackers
    >convention years ago in Las Vegas (or was it in Phoenix?), that hackers
    >logged in on a stock WiFi for a new record of being 52 miles (50
    >something anyway) away. Later I heard newer records being hundreds of
    >miles away. Now where are these guys when I setup my WiFi? As I have a
    >hard time pulling in mine just 600 feet away. lol



    No Bill, hadn't heard of that but I have seen and heard of antennas
    that supposedly can pull in the signal from a couple of miles. 52
    miles does sound incredible .... hope they wire up Houston so everyone
    can get free wifi all around the city instead of the bozo's that were
    hired and never delivered.
     
    RnR, Mar 27, 2012
    #9
  10. Tony

    Brian K Guest

    Brian K, Mar 27, 2012
    #10
  11. Tony

    Tony Guest

    "Brian K" <> wrote in message
    news:ixpcr.5087$%...
    > See this page regarding password strength....
    >
    > https://www.grc.com/haystack.htm

    What an interesting article; I think I'll start "padding" all the passwords
    I use pdq
     
    Tony, Mar 27, 2012
    #11
  12. Tony

    Tony Guest

    "BillW50" <> wrote in message
    news:jkso3t$4a8$...
    >
    > "RnR" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Mon, 26 Mar 2012 17:27:25 +1100, "Brian K"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I don't bother hiding the SSID as it gives you no extra security. No-one
    >>>is
    >>>going to get past your WPA2 even if they sit outside your house for a few
    >>>years.

    >>
    >> In theory NOT true but speaking in a practical sense, I agree.
    >> Unless one is paranoid, he's safe with WPA2 but there is free software
    >> to try to decrypt it. The problem is it takes a lot of cpu or time to
    >> do so and no one is going to bother unless they think it's worth the
    >> effort and have the money to buy multiple pc's to work on the
    >> decryption.

    >
    > I don't know if you have heard this before, but there was a hackers
    > convention years ago in Las Vegas (or was it in Phoenix?), that hackers
    > logged in on a stock WiFi for a new record of being 52 miles (50 something
    > anyway) away. Later I heard newer records being hundreds of miles away.
    > Now where are these guys when I setup my WiFi? As I have a hard time
    > pulling in mine just 600 feet away. lol
    >
    > --
    > Bill
    > Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Windows Live Mail 2009
    > Centrino Core2 Duo T7400 2.16 GHz - 1.5GB - Windows 8 CP

    LOL
     
    Tony, Mar 27, 2012
    #12
  13. Tony

    Brian K Guest

    Brian K, Mar 28, 2012
    #13
  14. Tony

    RnR Guest

    On Wed, 28 Mar 2012 12:53:29 +1100, "Brian K"
    <> wrote:

    >Interesting too...
    >
    >https://www.grc.com/passwords.htm
    >



    I read a lot of your references but I didn't see another (unless I
    missed it) aspect to password security. It's recommended to change
    your password on a regular basis. I have been hacked once or twice
    (luckily I was warned) and had to change my password on those
    accounts. Since I was hacked into once or twice, I do believe it's a
    good idea to change passwords from time to time.
     
    RnR, Mar 28, 2012
    #14
  15. Tony

    Daddy Guest

    On 3/27/2012 9:53 PM, Brian K wrote:
    > Interesting too...
    >
    > https://www.grc.com/passwords.htm
    >
    >


    Agreed, and a high entropy password is the most uncrackable.

    Passwords are the essence of wireless security. All other security
    measures can eventually fail when employed with a weak password. And a
    strong password makes many other common security measures, like masking
    the SSID, practically unnecessary.

    Enduring the inconvenience of a very long, high entropy password is
    rewarded with a good night's sleep.

    Daddy
     
    Daddy, Mar 28, 2012
    #15
  16. Tony

    dg1261 Guest

    "RnR" <> wrote in
    news::

    > I read a lot of your references but I didn't see another (unless I
    > missed it) aspect to password security. It's recommended to change
    > your password on a regular basis. I have been hacked once or twice
    > (luckily I was warned) and had to change my password on those
    > accounts. Since I was hacked into once or twice, I do believe
    > it's a good idea to change passwords from time to time.



    A couple listeners asked about that in Gibson's netcast Q&A episodes:

    http://media.grc.com/sn/sn-316.mp3 (fast-forward to 1:32:00)

    http://media.grc.com/sn/sn-322.mp3 (fast-forward to 0:50:30)

    The gist of Gibson's position is it serves no purpose to require routine,
    periodic changing of users' passwords. Such policies lead to weaker
    passwords being used, so the choice often comes down to whether it's
    better to have a strong password that doesn't get changed vs. a series of
    weaker passwords that get changed periodically.

    Of course, if you've been hacked or if a server's password database has
    been compromised, then passwords should be changed immediately.
    (Hopefully, nobody would be thinking, "Well, we got hacked last night,
    but it's okay because we have a policy that will require everyone to
    change their password in three weeks anyway.")

    So, if you have a strong password and it hasn't been compromised, forcing
    a user to change it provides no benefit. And if it's been compromised
    and you know it, then you're going to change it immediately regardless of
    whether there's a forced-change policy or not.

    The only question, then, is what happens if it's compromised and you
    *don't* know it? The gist of Gibson's position is that exposed passwords
    would get used immediately and a policy of forcing periodic changes won't
    prevent that from happening.

    I suppose that's debatable. But I think he has a valid point that
    forced-change policies can actually be harmful if they lead to users
    using weaker passwords or writing them down on post-its because they're
    changed too often to keep memorized.

    Probably the best practice is to change your password occasionally but
    only if you're not diluting its strength. If one uses a password manager
    like lastpass or keepass (my preference), that shouldn't be hard to do.
     
    dg1261, Mar 28, 2012
    #16
  17. Tony

    RnR Guest

    On Wed, 28 Mar 2012 20:48:06 +0000 (UTC), dg1261
    <> wrote:

    >"RnR" <> wrote in
    >news::
    >
    >> I read a lot of your references but I didn't see another (unless I
    >> missed it) aspect to password security. It's recommended to change
    >> your password on a regular basis. I have been hacked once or twice
    >> (luckily I was warned) and had to change my password on those
    >> accounts. Since I was hacked into once or twice, I do believe
    >> it's a good idea to change passwords from time to time.

    >
    >
    >A couple listeners asked about that in Gibson's netcast Q&A episodes:
    >
    >http://media.grc.com/sn/sn-316.mp3 (fast-forward to 1:32:00)
    >
    >http://media.grc.com/sn/sn-322.mp3 (fast-forward to 0:50:30)
    >
    >The gist of Gibson's position is it serves no purpose to require routine,
    >periodic changing of users' passwords. Such policies lead to weaker
    >passwords being used, so the choice often comes down to whether it's
    >better to have a strong password that doesn't get changed vs. a series of
    >weaker passwords that get changed periodically.
    >
    >Of course, if you've been hacked or if a server's password database has
    >been compromised, then passwords should be changed immediately.
    >(Hopefully, nobody would be thinking, "Well, we got hacked last night,
    >but it's okay because we have a policy that will require everyone to
    >change their password in three weeks anyway.")
    >
    >So, if you have a strong password and it hasn't been compromised, forcing
    >a user to change it provides no benefit. And if it's been compromised
    >and you know it, then you're going to change it immediately regardless of
    >whether there's a forced-change policy or not.
    >
    >The only question, then, is what happens if it's compromised and you
    >*don't* know it? The gist of Gibson's position is that exposed passwords
    >would get used immediately and a policy of forcing periodic changes won't
    >prevent that from happening.
    >
    >I suppose that's debatable. But I think he has a valid point that
    >forced-change policies can actually be harmful if they lead to users
    >using weaker passwords or writing them down on post-its because they're
    >changed too often to keep memorized.
    >
    >Probably the best practice is to change your password occasionally but
    >only if you're not diluting its strength. If one uses a password manager
    >like lastpass or keepass (my preference), that shouldn't be hard to do.



    The last thing seems to be the consensus of what I've read over the
    years. I think if you change it often enough, maybe the strength
    won't be that important unless you make it too easy to guess. As you
    said earlier, it's debatable. I guess there is no right or wrong
    answer here. For me, I like the idea of at least a medium strength
    password but that's debatable too.
     
    RnR, Mar 28, 2012
    #17
  18. Tony

    Brian K Guest

    Brian K, Mar 29, 2012
    #18
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