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Windows 7 x64 Processes

 
 
Monica
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      03-07-2012, 04:02 AM
I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those down. Maybe I'm
not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm right clicking on a process and
choosing "end process". A few minutes later, it's back. This particular
process is (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need it. How do I
permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes down to about 30 in
XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's different in Windows 7. I've
got a Dell XPS i7 8300
Thanks

 
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Pen
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      03-07-2012, 04:16 AM
On 3/6/2012 11:02 PM, Monica wrote:
> I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those
> down. Maybe I'm not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm
> right clicking on a process and choosing "end process". A
> few minutes later, it's back. This particular process is
> (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need it. How do I
> permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes down
> to about 30 in XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's
> different in Windows 7. I've got a Dell XPS i7 8300
> Thanks

You need to stop the "service".

ControlPanel\administrative tools\services

Change the Startup Type to manual from Automatic. It will
still run if needed.
 
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Daddy
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      03-07-2012, 06:12 PM
Monica wrote:
> I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those down. Maybe
> I'm not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm right clicking on a
> process and choosing "end process". A few minutes later, it's back.
> This particular process is (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need
> it. How do I permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes
> down to about 30 in XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's
> different in Windows 7. I've got a Dell XPS i7 8300
> Thanks


What made you decide on "30" processes? How did you choose 30 over 40 or 20?

This question is the sign of someone who doesn't really understand what
they're doing and should leave Windows alone.

Daddy
 
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Monica
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      03-08-2012, 04:40 AM
Thanks Pen. I did that right after I got the new computer but was very
conservative with my changes since I was new to Win 7.
You don't have all the auto services set to manual do you?

"Pen" wrote in message news:jj6nfk$fgg$(E-Mail Removed)...

On 3/6/2012 11:02 PM, Monica wrote:
> I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those
> down. Maybe I'm not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm
> right clicking on a process and choosing "end process". A
> few minutes later, it's back. This particular process is
> (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need it. How do I
> permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes down
> to about 30 in XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's
> different in Windows 7. I've got a Dell XPS i7 8300
> Thanks

You need to stop the "service".

ControlPanel\administrative tools\services

Change the Startup Type to manual from Automatic. It will
still run if needed.
 
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Pen
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-08-2012, 09:51 PM
On 3/7/2012 11:40 PM, Monica wrote:
> Thanks Pen. I did that right after I got the new computer
> but was very conservative with my changes since I was new to
> Win 7.
> You don't have all the auto services set to manual do you?
>
> "Pen" wrote in message news:jj6nfk$fgg$(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 3/6/2012 11:02 PM, Monica wrote:
>> I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those
>> down. Maybe I'm not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm
>> right clicking on a process and choosing "end process". A
>> few minutes later, it's back. This particular process is
>> (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need it. How do I
>> permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes down
>> to about 30 in XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's
>> different in Windows 7. I've got a Dell XPS i7 8300
>> Thanks

> You need to stop the "service".
>
> ControlPanel\administrative tools\services
>
> Change the Startup Type to manual from Automatic. It will
> still run if needed.

Lord no. I use Black Viper for ideas about services.
http://www.blackviper.com/2010/12/17...onfigurations/
 
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RnR
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      03-11-2012, 10:41 PM
On Tue, 6 Mar 2012 22:02:09 -0600, "Monica" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those down. Maybe I'm
>not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm right clicking on a process and
>choosing "end process". A few minutes later, it's back. This particular
>process is (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need it. How do I
>permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes down to about 30 in
>XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's different in Windows 7. I've
>got a Dell XPS i7 8300
>Thanks




Going back the XP days, one of my favorite sites for which ones to
keep and not keep came from Blackviper.com . I haven't been to his
site in years but he still maintains it and I know at one time it was
held in high regard. Once you know how to stop (etc..) a service, you
may want to give his site a visit. And if you do, please let us know
if you think it's still worthy of my recommendation.
 
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Daddy
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-13-2012, 02:47 PM
RnR wrote:
> On Tue, 6 Mar 2012 22:02:09 -0600, "Monica" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>> I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those down. Maybe I'm
>> not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm right clicking on a process and
>> choosing "end process". A few minutes later, it's back. This particular
>> process is (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need it. How do I
>> permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes down to about 30 in
>> XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's different in Windows 7. I've
>> got a Dell XPS i7 8300
>> Thanks

>
>
>
> Going back the XP days, one of my favorite sites for which ones to
> keep and not keep came from Blackviper.com . I haven't been to his
> site in years but he still maintains it and I know at one time it was
> held in high regard. Once you know how to stop (etc..) a service, you
> may want to give his site a visit. And if you do, please let us know
> if you think it's still worthy of my recommendation.


The problem with following BV's advice is 1) it doesn't really make a
difference, and 2) it can cause trouble in the future.

It doesn't really make a difference - because today's hardware is so
fast and today's computers have plenty of RAM. Even back in the day when
XP first came out, any difference in performance were usually negligible.

It can cause trouble in the future - because software you install in the
future may need the service(s) you disable today.

In general, playing with an operating system without first acquiring a
full knowledge of what you're doing, which includes instructions for
recovering if your experiments go awry, is insane.

This is not to say that you should never disable a service; but if
you're going to do that, you need to have a specific reason for doing
so. Wholesale dismantling of services under the guise of improving
performance is a fool's game.

Daddy
 
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RnR
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-13-2012, 05:40 PM
On Tue, 13 Mar 2012 10:47:26 -0400, Daddy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>RnR wrote:
>> On Tue, 6 Mar 2012 22:02:09 -0600, "Monica" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those down. Maybe I'm
>>> not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm right clicking on a process and
>>> choosing "end process". A few minutes later, it's back. This particular
>>> process is (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need it. How do I
>>> permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes down to about 30 in
>>> XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's different in Windows 7. I've
>>> got a Dell XPS i7 8300
>>> Thanks

>>
>>
>>
>> Going back the XP days, one of my favorite sites for which ones to
>> keep and not keep came from Blackviper.com . I haven't been to his
>> site in years but he still maintains it and I know at one time it was
>> held in high regard. Once you know how to stop (etc..) a service, you
>> may want to give his site a visit. And if you do, please let us know
>> if you think it's still worthy of my recommendation.

>
>The problem with following BV's advice is 1) it doesn't really make a
>difference, and 2) it can cause trouble in the future.
>
>It doesn't really make a difference - because today's hardware is so
>fast and today's computers have plenty of RAM. Even back in the day when
>XP first came out, any difference in performance were usually negligible.
>
>It can cause trouble in the future - because software you install in the
>future may need the service(s) you disable today.
>
>In general, playing with an operating system without first acquiring a
>full knowledge of what you're doing, which includes instructions for
>recovering if your experiments go awry, is insane.
>
>This is not to say that you should never disable a service; but if
>you're going to do that, you need to have a specific reason for doing
>so. Wholesale dismantling of services under the guise of improving
>performance is a fool's game.
>
>Daddy




His site used to give a good explanations for each service and gave
some various scenarios to able/disable the mass amount of services. I
haven't checked his site to know if it still does that. It can still
make some differences abling and disabling services (ie: network
services, ms bloatware, etc..) but I admit it isn't something the
average person should do. And in general playing with an operating
system (not just services... ie: registry editing) should be with
knowledge not guessing or hoping.
 
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nothing but net
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-13-2012, 07:46 PM
On Tue, 13 Mar 2012 12:40:30 -0500, "RnR" <(E-Mail Removed)> posted:

>On Tue, 13 Mar 2012 10:47:26 -0400, Daddy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>RnR wrote:
>>> On Tue, 6 Mar 2012 22:02:09 -0600, "Monica" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those down. Maybe I'm
>>>> not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm right clicking on a process and
>>>> choosing "end process". A few minutes later, it's back. This particular
>>>> process is (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need it. How do I
>>>> permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes down to about 30 in
>>>> XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's different in Windows 7. I've
>>>> got a Dell XPS i7 8300
>>>> Thanks
>>>
>>> Going back the XP days, one of my favorite sites for which ones to
>>> keep and not keep came from Blackviper.com . I haven't been to his
>>> site in years but he still maintains it and I know at one time it was
>>> held in high regard. Once you know how to stop (etc..) a service, you
>>> may want to give his site a visit. And if you do, please let us know
>>> if you think it's still worthy of my recommendation.

>>
>>The problem with following BV's advice is 1) it doesn't really make a
>>difference, and 2) it can cause trouble in the future.
>>
>>It doesn't really make a difference - because today's hardware is so
>>fast and today's computers have plenty of RAM. Even back in the day when
>>XP first came out, any difference in performance were usually negligible.
>>
>>It can cause trouble in the future - because software you install in the
>>future may need the service(s) you disable today.
>>
>>In general, playing with an operating system without first acquiring a
>>full knowledge of what you're doing, which includes instructions for
>>recovering if your experiments go awry, is insane.
>>
>>This is not to say that you should never disable a service; but if
>>you're going to do that, you need to have a specific reason for doing
>>so. Wholesale dismantling of services under the guise of improving
>>performance is a fool's game.
>>
>>Daddy

>
>His site used to give a good explanations for each service and gave
>some various scenarios to able/disable the mass amount of services. I
>haven't checked his site to know if it still does that. It can still
>make some differences abling and disabling services (ie: network
>services, ms bloatware, etc..) but I admit it isn't something the
>average person should do. And in general playing with an operating
>system (not just services... ie: registry editing) should be with
>knowledge not guessing or hoping.



On the other hand, not configuring Windows to do what you want equates
to guessing and hoping that MS has your best interests at heart.
Unlikely. Windows is a tool, the user is the master. Taking what you
get equates to being subservient to the slave.

The average user has to have a backup and restore system that works.
With that the user can be reckless (within reason, of course) with
what steps are taken to control Windows. So one gets carried away
disabling services - the computer won't explode... the very worst
that can happen is that a backup is restored.

Another area that the "default" needs to get hammered is Task
Scheduler. There are scads of stuff that run for no particularly good
reason other than, 'well, it gives Windows something to do'.

The meek may inherit the earth, but in the meantime they don't have an
efficient computer.
 
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RnR
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-14-2012, 02:30 AM
On Tue, 13 Mar 2012 12:46:43 -0700, nothing but net <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>On Tue, 13 Mar 2012 12:40:30 -0500, "RnR" <(E-Mail Removed)> posted:
>
>>On Tue, 13 Mar 2012 10:47:26 -0400, Daddy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>>RnR wrote:
>>>> On Tue, 6 Mar 2012 22:02:09 -0600, "Monica" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I've got 81 processes running. I'm trying to whittle those down. Maybe I'm
>>>>> not doing it right. In Task Manager, I'm right clicking on a process and
>>>>> choosing "end process". A few minutes later, it's back. This particular
>>>>> process is (Apple) MobileDeviceService. I don't need it. How do I
>>>>> permanently stop processes? I used to keep processes down to about 30 in
>>>>> XP. I've either forgotten how to it or it's different in Windows 7. I've
>>>>> got a Dell XPS i7 8300
>>>>> Thanks
>>>>
>>>> Going back the XP days, one of my favorite sites for which ones to
>>>> keep and not keep came from Blackviper.com . I haven't been to his
>>>> site in years but he still maintains it and I know at one time it was
>>>> held in high regard. Once you know how to stop (etc..) a service, you
>>>> may want to give his site a visit. And if you do, please let us know
>>>> if you think it's still worthy of my recommendation.
>>>
>>>The problem with following BV's advice is 1) it doesn't really make a
>>>difference, and 2) it can cause trouble in the future.
>>>
>>>It doesn't really make a difference - because today's hardware is so
>>>fast and today's computers have plenty of RAM. Even back in the day when
>>>XP first came out, any difference in performance were usually negligible.
>>>
>>>It can cause trouble in the future - because software you install in the
>>>future may need the service(s) you disable today.
>>>
>>>In general, playing with an operating system without first acquiring a
>>>full knowledge of what you're doing, which includes instructions for
>>>recovering if your experiments go awry, is insane.
>>>
>>>This is not to say that you should never disable a service; but if
>>>you're going to do that, you need to have a specific reason for doing
>>>so. Wholesale dismantling of services under the guise of improving
>>>performance is a fool's game.
>>>
>>>Daddy

>>
>>His site used to give a good explanations for each service and gave
>>some various scenarios to able/disable the mass amount of services. I
>>haven't checked his site to know if it still does that. It can still
>>make some differences abling and disabling services (ie: network
>>services, ms bloatware, etc..) but I admit it isn't something the
>>average person should do. And in general playing with an operating
>>system (not just services... ie: registry editing) should be with
>>knowledge not guessing or hoping.

>
>
>On the other hand, not configuring Windows to do what you want equates
>to guessing and hoping that MS has your best interests at heart.
>Unlikely. Windows is a tool, the user is the master. Taking what you
>get equates to being subservient to the slave.
>
>The average user has to have a backup and restore system that works.
>With that the user can be reckless (within reason, of course) with
>what steps are taken to control Windows. So one gets carried away
>disabling services - the computer won't explode... the very worst
>that can happen is that a backup is restored.
>
>Another area that the "default" needs to get hammered is Task
>Scheduler. There are scads of stuff that run for no particularly good
>reason other than, 'well, it gives Windows something to do'.
>
>The meek may inherit the earth, but in the meantime they don't have an
>efficient computer.



I agree with you except I think you are giving the average user too
much credit. Some don't even know what version of windows they use,
etc... .
 
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