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100GB Hard Disk Drive, 7200rpm versus 160GB Hard Disk Drive, 5400rpm

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by amandaf37, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. amandaf37

    amandaf37 Guest

    I am customizing a thinkpad. I read some discussion about 5400 rpm
    vs 7200rpm and cannot make a deciison.

    If I am getting a laptop that is Intel Core 2 Duo T7500 (2.2GHz 800MHz
    4MBL2) with 2GB RAM, and (also gettign Intel Turbo Memory 1GB - this
    is hrad druve cache), what should I choose between the two below for
    hard drive that are the same price?

    100GB Hard Disk Drive, 7200rpm [$60.00] [Popular upgrade]
    38% of customers who purchased a T Series upgraded to this hard drive

    versus

    160GB Hard Disk Drive, 5400rpm [$60.00]
     
    amandaf37, Sep 2, 2007
    #1
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  2. amandaf37

    BillW50 Guest

    In typed:
    Well the 7200rpm 100GB drive will be faster. Since the hard drive is the
    bottleneck of virtually all computers, this is important for those that
    really need the speed.
     
    BillW50, Sep 2, 2007
    #2
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  3. amandaf37

    amandaf37 Guest

    Okay. I wish they have 160GB option in 7200 rpm.

    How do I find out the size of the biggest HD I can replace in case of
    the original the HD crash?
     
    amandaf37, Sep 3, 2007
    #3
  4. It's just a trade off between capacity and speed (and, if are willing to
    spend more $$$, you can have both).

    Personally, I was faced with the same choice and went for capacity
    (160GB/5,400 rpm). But that is based on my needs and how I used the
    laptop .... and may not apply to you.

    However, consider that with 160GB/5,400, you will be able to do
    everything that you could do with the 100GB 7200rpm drive, it will just
    be slower. The reverse is not true, if you go with the faster/smaller
    drive, and you NEED the extra space, you will be stuck.
     
    Barry Watzman, Sep 3, 2007
    #4
  5. amandaf37

    BillW50 Guest

    In typed:
    Well 160GB @ 7200rpm do exists out there. But they are not cheap. You
    can buy 320GB @ 7200rpm too. There might be larger ones as well.
    You mean for a given laptop? If so, this seems to be a secret in most
    cases. As 99% of the time or better, this information is never given.
    Although there are usual limits. One of them is 120GB. The one you are
    looking at also has a 160GB option. And you should be ok (no guarantee)
    up to 320GB @ 7200 rpm anyway.
     
    BillW50, Sep 3, 2007
    #5
  6. amandaf37

    amandaf37 Guest

    True. I am also thinking to have a second hard drive via ThinkPad
    Serial ATA Hard Drive Bay Adapter or a docking station.

    BTW, If I put a 3.5" HD in an enclosure and turned it into an
    external drive. I will then be able to use it with the laptop too,
    right?
     
    amandaf37, Sep 3, 2007
    #6
  7. amandaf37

    BillW50 Guest

    In typed:
    Yes! As long as the external hooks up by USB, Firewire, or some other
    method that is compatible with the laptop.
     
    BillW50, Sep 3, 2007
    #7
  8. amandaf37

    Bert Hyman Guest

    In
    Not just 160GB, but 200GB.

    Hitachi 160GB 7K200 HTS722016K9SA00 $190
    Hitachi 200GB 7K200 HTS722020K9SA00 $215

    at newegg.com.
     
    Bert Hyman, Sep 3, 2007
    #8
  9. There ARE 160GB (and I think even 200GB) drives in 7200 rpm, but they
    are expensive (more than twice, and possibly 3x more than a 160GB 5,400
    rpm drive).

    Another option is to get the cheapest, smallest, slowest drive you can,
    then replace the drive more or less immediately on receipt of the
    laptop. However, it means either moving or reinstalling everything,
    sometimes a non-trivial task if there are hidden "maintenance"
    partitions on the drive.

     
    Barry Watzman, Sep 3, 2007
    #9
  10. Re: "You can buy 320GB @ 7200rpm too"

    Not for a laptop, with a 2.5" drive. Not yet.
     
    Barry Watzman, Sep 3, 2007
    #10
  11. Use it, yes. But perhaps not boot from it, and it may not have the
    speed of an internal SATA drive (indeed, using it as a USB external
    drive may negate the difference between 5,400 and 7,200 rpm).
     
    Barry Watzman, Sep 3, 2007
    #11
  12. amandaf37

    amandaf37 Guest

    The one I am looking at is 100GB (7200 rpm) and 160GB (5400 rpm).
    If I take 100GB (7200 rpm) option and when it crashed, I wonder
    whether I can put 160 GB (7200 rpm).

     
    amandaf37, Sep 3, 2007
    #12
  13. amandaf37

    amandaf37 Guest

    I meant in the option list I get to choose in customizing for
    thinkpad. May be I should go for dell.
     
    amandaf37, Sep 3, 2007
    #13
  14. amandaf37

    amandaf37 Guest

    Alright then.
     
    amandaf37, Sep 3, 2007
    #14
  15. amandaf37

    amandaf37 Guest

    I know. I meant I want to have a 160GB (7200rpm) option withthe T61p
    thinkpad that I am custmizing.
    Then I will lose warranty on the hd purcahsed; also time is an issue
    to even go fund someone who can help me. Beside I don't want to take
    a chance voiding the warranty of other parts..
     
    amandaf37, Sep 3, 2007
    #15
  16. amandaf37

    amandaf37 Guest

    That explains why circuit city has a Toshiba with 320GB but 5400 rpm.
     
    amandaf37, Sep 3, 2007
    #16
  17. amandaf37

    BillW50 Guest

    In typed:
    I don't know if any laptops come with 320GB @ 7200rpm. But they do sell
    them and will fit a laptop.
     
    BillW50, Sep 3, 2007
    #17
  18. amandaf37

    BillW50 Guest

    In typed:
    Oh you should have no problems with replacing it someday with a 160GB @
    7200 rpm HD.
     
    BillW50, Sep 3, 2007
    #18
  19. Yes. No problem. Any size (GB) and any rotational speed.
     
    Barry Watzman, Sep 3, 2007
    #19
  20. You keep the original hard drive, and if there is a problem with the
    laptop you just put it back in. No one will ever know that you changed
    the drive (and, whether you did or not, changing the drive should not
    void the warranty anyway).

    Of course the warranty on the new, larger hard drive comes from the hard
    drive manufacturer, not the laptop manufacturer.
     
    Barry Watzman, Sep 3, 2007
    #20
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