120 gb is the Largest hard drive I can put in my 4550?

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Suzeann Loomis, Dec 4, 2003.

  1. Help, please.

    I have been told that I can only add another 120 gigabyte hard drive
    to my Dell 4550. But people at a local computer shop say I can add a
    250 gigabyte hard drive.

    Which is true? I need more space for my photography.

    Thank you.

    Suze Loomis
     
    Suzeann Loomis, Dec 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. Suz:

    Go RAID 5 and SCSI and you will not have the artificial barriers of IDE hard disk
    controllers. Plus you a very reliable and very fast disk sub-system.

    Dave



    |
    | Help, please.
    |
    | I have been told that I can only add another 120 gigabyte hard drive
    | to my Dell 4550. But people at a local computer shop say I can add a
    | 250 gigabyte hard drive.
    |
    | Which is true? I need more space for my photography.
    |
    | Thank you.
    |
    | Suze Loomis
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 4, 2003
    #2
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  3. Suzeann Loomis

    Tom Scales Guest

    4550 supports 48-bit LBA so the 250GB works fine. I have one in the 4550
    that I am typing this on

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, Dec 4, 2003
    #3
  4. Suzeann Loomis

    Tom Scales Guest

    Dave,

    That's ridiculous. A $900 computer and $1500 worth of disk.

    250GB works fine in a 4550.

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, Dec 4, 2003
    #4
  5. Except...

    You are not taking into account; the importance of the data, the reliability factor and
    the sheer speed that RAID 5 provides.

    As for the cost of the system vs the cost of the disk sub-system -- it's a moot point. It
    has no bearing what so ever. What matters is the functionality, application and the need
    for reliability.

    What happens if that 250GB drive dies ? Then what ?
    Think about the backup alternatives for 250GB. AIT2, DLT etc. Think about the time it
    takes to back up 250GBs of data.
    Using RAID, if one hard disk dies, the user still has access to the data and the failed
    drive can easily be replaced.

    Think outside the box. Think about the - what ifs....

    Dave


    | Dave,
    |
    | That's ridiculous. A $900 computer and $1500 worth of disk.
    |
    | 250GB works fine in a 4550.
    |
    | Tom
    | | > Suz:
    | >
    | > Go RAID 5 and SCSI and you will not have the artificial barriers of IDE
    | hard disk
    | > controllers. Plus you a very reliable and very fast disk sub-system.
    | >
    | > Dave
    | >
    | >
    | >
    | > | > |
    | > | Help, please.
    | > |
    | > | I have been told that I can only add another 120 gigabyte hard drive
    | > | to my Dell 4550. But people at a local computer shop say I can add a
    | > | 250 gigabyte hard drive.
    | > |
    | > | Which is true? I need more space for my photography.
    | > |
    | > | Thank you.
    | > |
    | > | Suze Loomis
    | >
    | >
    |
    |
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 4, 2003
    #5

  6. You probably have Windows XP Home installed on your PC.
    It probably came without Service Pack 1 installed. The largest hard
    drive addresseable in WinXP without the Service Pack 1 is 137GB.
    The normal HD size break is from 120GB to 160GB. Since your
    PC's manufacturer doesn't want to support what he hasn't sold
    (and therefore hasn't tested), its tech reps say the largest HD that
    your PC will take is 120GB. To see if your PC has SP1, right click
    on My Computer, left click Properties, and look at the General
    panel. Under "System" it should say if Service Pack 1 is installed.
    If it's not there, all you have to do is to download Service Pack 1
    (SP1) for Windows XP from the Microsoft Windows Update website,
    and you're set to go with HDs larger than 137GB. It might also not hurt
    to be sure you have the latest BIOS for your motherboard, available
    from Dell's website. Check your owner's manual to see how to find
    out what version of the BIOS your PC currently has or call Dell's
    Tech Support for instructions.

    *TimDaniels*
     
    Timothy Daniels, Dec 4, 2003
    #6
  7. Suzeann Loomis

    Phred Guest

    I can understand your enthusiasm for a RAID system that provides data
    redundancy, but do you need to run a SCSI system to do this?

    I have the impression from comments elsewhere in recent times that
    modern IDE drives are perfectly adequate and SCSI is quite simply
    over-priced, perhaps even over-rated, in comparison these days?

    [...]


    Cheers, Phred.
     
    Phred, Dec 4, 2003
    #7
  8. Suzeann Loomis

    Rod Speed Guest

    Yep, mad.
    Nope. Tho RAID5 IDE aint that common.
    Correct, and the I in RAID is for INEXPENSIVE.
    Been that way for years now.

    There are still a few advantages with SCSI if you really need
    full hotswap RAID5, particularly rather more choice, but you
    pay one hell of a price for that and very few actually need full
    hotswap RAID5 with personal desktop systems anyway.
     
    Rod Speed, Dec 4, 2003
    #8
  9. Suzeann Loomis

    Miro Guest

    Lots of photographers run 100's of gigs and there is nothing they can do to
    keep it smaller. Digital Pro photography has been one application for RAID
    systems.

    Only a very elite number of IDE models have "enterprise" tags - which means
    they are as close to bullet-proof as an IDE drive can be in 2003.

    Enterprise drives are nearly the same cost as decent SCSI drives anyhow. It
    is simply that IDE works on more standard and less expensive motherboards.

    SATA is another thing to look at. SATA Raid is now making a strong
    appearance.

    As for the HD being more expensive than PC ...... it used to be the other
    way around and back then the machines were nowhere as impressive as they are
    now.
     
    Miro, Dec 4, 2003
    #9
  10. Thank you everyone for your help and setting me straight with sound
    advice.

    I will go ahead and get a large second drive, thanks to you.

    Suzeann Loomis
     
    Suzeann Loomis, Dec 4, 2003
    #10
  11. How many RAID 5 systems have you setup and how often have you used SCSI ?

    Dave
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 4, 2003
    #11
  12. Phred wrote:

    ....snip....
    For home and SOHO and SME, IDE is probably quite okay.

    But IDE isn't SCSI and without SCSI, you can not do RAID.

    It really is a "business risk"
    How much do you loose per hour when the computer system goes down?


    --
    Terry Collins {:)}}} email: terryc at woa.com.au www:
    http://www.woa.com.au
    Wombat Outdoor Adventures <Bicycles, Computers, GIS, Printing,
    Publishing>

    "People without trees are like fish without clean water"
     
    Terry Collins, Dec 4, 2003
    #12
  13. "Terry Collins" :
    Why do you say "without SCSI, you can not do RAID"?
    We have here 4 separate RAID systems on IDE.. RAID 0, 1, 0/1 and 5
    One has 1TB+ volume, six 200GB HDs on a six channel IDE controller

    One of the advantages of SCSI against IDE is "command queuing"
    This means that if the controller receives a number of commands and it is
    more efficient (time wise) to process them in a different order, it will do
    that.
    Parallel ATA can not do that BUT SATA will!

    There is another solution I am looking into now: a self contained RAID 15
    hotswap slots IDE enclosure that has a SCSI bridge so you can extend your
    server with an external pseudo-SCSI massive store..

    So there is scope..

    Cristian Croitoru
     
    Cristian Croitoru, Dec 4, 2003
    #13
  14. Suzeann Loomis

    Hunter1 Guest


    Yeah you can, plenty of IDE RAID options available. In fact
    motherboards such as the "ASUS P4C800 Gold Deluxe" come with
    it built in.
     
    Hunter1, Dec 4, 2003
    #14
  15. Cristian:

    After you have done your research, I'd be interested in the information.

    Dave




    | There is another solution I am looking into now: a self contained RAID 15
    | hotswap slots IDE enclosure that has a SCSI bridge so you can extend your
    | server with an external pseudo-SCSI massive store..
    |
    | So there is scope..
    |
    | Cristian Croitoru
    |
    |
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 5, 2003
    #15
  16. Suzeann Loomis

    Leythos Guest

    Actually there are several 4, 6, 8 port IDE RAID Array cards out there
    that put SCSI up for a run in performance. I bought a SX6000 for a
    customer and it outperformed the U160 5 drive array with U160 SCSI
    drives at 10K RPM,

    http://www.promise.com/product/product_detail_eng.asp?productId=84
    &familyId=7

    Form small shops, any raid is important, and IDE drives don't fail any
    more than SCSI ones do in my experience.
     
    Leythos, Dec 5, 2003
    #16
  17. Cristian Croitoru, Dec 5, 2003
    #17
  18. Ohhhh - I thought you had a quality solution.

    I dealt with Promise products when I was a VAR. I steer away from their products now.
    Thanx anyway.

    Dave



    | have a look at www.promise.com
    | "David H. Lipman" :
    | > After you have done your research, I'd be interested in the information.
    |
    |
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 5, 2003
    #18
  19. Suzeann Loomis

    Leythos Guest

    We've installed 4 of the SX6000 in servers that are being hit hard by
    development teams and run Windows 2000 AS and SQL Server. Never a
    problem in almost a year of using them.

    Quality problems run in cycles from every vendor.
     
    Leythos, Dec 5, 2003
    #19
  20. fluke? I have 5 promise controllers here, 3 types, no problems.
    "David H. Lipman"
    products now.
     
    Cristian Croitoru, Dec 5, 2003
    #20
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