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3.2 GHz HT system now suddenly 1.6 GHz on boot-up? Fried processor?

Discussion in 'Intel' started by John Here, Aug 28, 2003.

  1. John Here

    John Here Guest

    Before I approach Intel support, I wonder if anyone here has any
    ideas. This morning, on boot up, my 3.2 GHz HT PC ran noticeably
    slower.

    Using SciSoft Sandra, I did a benchmark, and noticed that it said my
    PC was a 1.6 GHz system, and not 3.2 - weird?

    So I booted up and sure enough; on boot-up it says the processor is a
    1.6.

    I've enabled - and disabled - HT in the BIOS, to no avail.

    My PC has become a 1.6 GHz system!

    Any ideas? Is the processor fried?

    Thanks
     
    John Here, Aug 28, 2003
    #1
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  2. John Here

    Alex Johnson Guest

    These are the mysteries of life. Do you have an autosensing motherboard
    that decided to auto-sense your CPU as a 400MHz bus type rather than an
    800MHz bus type? Could you have changed a setting in your BIOS that
    changed the multiplier or bus frequency and you haven't noticed? I'd
    investigate these possibilities. There might have been a random jump
    that made your computer autosense wrong and then save that info, or
    there could be a defect on your chip that keeps telling the BIOS the
    wrong speed. Good luck.

    Alex
     
    Alex Johnson, Aug 28, 2003
    #2
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  3. John Here

    John Here Guest

    Thanks for the rapid response.

    It's an Intel 865G motherboard if that helps - where would I find
    these BIOS settings to check?

    The PC has been running fine for about a month now, since I got it.
     
    John Here, Aug 28, 2003
    #3
  4. John Here

    Mike Smith Guest

    See if your heatsink's come loose or fallen off, or the fan has failed.
    Maybe it's throttling.
     
    Mike Smith, Aug 28, 2003
    #4
  5. John Here

    Strontium Guest

    On laptops....

    -
    Chuck Tribolet stood up at show-n-tell, in
    bil27d$vc8$, and said:
     
    Strontium, Aug 28, 2003
    #5
  6. John Here

    Strontium Guest

    Try running a repair install of XP (is that your OS?), with HT enabled in
    CMOS.

    -
    John Here stood up at show-n-tell, in
    , and said:
     
    Strontium, Aug 28, 2003
    #6
  7. John Here

    Alex Johnson Guest

    I can't say exactly where your BIOS settings are. It is vendor
    dependant. Usually during the power-on self test (POST) you will be
    prompted to press a certain key to setup. If it doesn't say which key,
    you can try the common ones: hold control (compaq), press F1 or F10 or
    DEL at the correct time, control-alt-insert (really old IBMs)....

    Other posters have also noted that power saving modes can affect speed,
    but on the P4 desktop with 865G chipset you should not be able to enable
    these (except to put the machine into suspend...AFAIK. My 865 system
    won't arrive until next week). Another suggestion was that the chip is
    thermal throttling. The P4 will not show up during startup (or any
    other time) as a different speed. Thermal throttling in the P4 is done
    by injecting idle periods (the processor is still pumping away at
    3.2GHz, but nothing is being done, so there is less switching and
    therefore less heat generated).

    Alex
     
    Alex Johnson, Aug 28, 2003
    #7
  8. John Here

    Guess Who Guest

    It has nothing to do with the OS, as he said the POST screen shows 1.6Ghz as
    well, that's before the operating system is loaded.
     
    Guess Who, Aug 29, 2003
    #8
  9. John Here

    Strontium Guest

    Perhaps CMOS is corrupt, then? He, also, was very vague about what he has
    done to the system. When I posted that reply, I was unclear as to whether
    he modified any CMOS settings. I, even (as impossible, as it seems, being
    human and all), did not gleen his statement about POST. Admittedly, I was
    grasping at straws. Regardless, it should not change the processor speed
    identification by CMOS. My guesses: He's got corrupted BIOS or bad
    processor, or bad motherboard. But, thanks for your observation.

    -
    Guess Who stood up at show-n-tell, in ,
    and said:
     
    Strontium, Aug 29, 2003
    #9
  10. John Here

    John Here Guest

    Thanks for the feedback - looks like it's going back to the shop.
    Damn.

    FYI, I didn't do anything to the CMOS - but did try fiddling with
    memory and other CMOS settings after reading the initial msg here . To
    no avail. It has been running fine for the past three weeks.

    Fan's still sitting on the processor; it seems to be sitting in there
    pretty tight.

    The *instant* the PC switches on, the first screen reads the
    following:

    PRODUCT: D865GBF
    Version: AAC28142
    Processor Specs: 1.60A GHz ("A" GHZ - what's that? - here it
    used to say 3.2)
    System Bus Speed: 800MHz
    System Memory Speed: 333 MHz

    If the CMOS is corrupt, is there anything *I* can do to get it right?
    Or is it a "shop" thing?

    I tried a trick we used to do in the old days - unplug the motherboard
    battery, and let it "drain" - hoping that would work. It only rest the
    time (or so I hear shouts of amazement that I'd try something so
    foolish?).

    And - even if you think you're stretching it - was there something I
    could have done in Windows XP itself (outside CMOS) that could "reset"
    the CMOS to "create" a 1.6 "A" GHz PC? I want to try all options
    before giving up the system for a few days for repairs.
     
    John Here, Aug 29, 2003
    #10
  11. John Here

    Alex Johnson Guest

    1.6A means it is a 400MHz bus Northwood part. The first pentium 4s were
    0.18 micron technology with 256K cache. They then released 0.13 micron
    parts with 512K caches at the same speeds. To distinguish them, intel
    added A to the speed. Then intel upped the bus speed to 533MHz and
    released more parts at the same speed again. They changed the name to B
    to avoid confusion (?!). Now there are the 800MHz bus parts with HT.
    Not surprisingly, intel released lower speed parts overlapping existing
    parts from A and B, so it called them C. Expect the same thing to
    happen with Prescott. 3.0D GHz chips....

    Right now you can buy a 2.4GHz Celeron, a 2.4A GHz Pentium 4, a 2.4B GHz
    Pentium 4, a 2.4C GHz Pentium 4, a 2.4GHz Xeon (400MHz bus), a 2.4GHz
    Xeon (533MHz bus), and a 2.4GHz Xeon-MP. And intel wonders why vendors
    are always angry and customers are always confused.

    Alex
     
    Alex Johnson, Aug 29, 2003
    #11
  12. John Here

    John Here Guest

    Took all the suggestions here, mixed it up, did some illogical jumps
    of my own, and it's back to 3.2 GHz again.

    Here's what I did - rightly or wrongly (I'm keeping on eye on
    temperature just in case - right now "Processor Zone" is at 46 degrees
    C, and the two "System Zones" at 37 and 38 degrees):

    1) Opened the box, looking for the CMOS jumper. The board doesn't have
    one! It's got the space for one, but all that's there are two neat
    little solder points. I thought of "short circuiting" it myself with a
    piece of wire, but rejected that after a few milliseconds. Probably
    wise?

    2) Right next to the CMOS points on the motherboard, however, was a
    "BIOS CONFIG" jumper, with three settings: Normal, Config, and RCVRY
    (which I assume to be "recovery"). So I set it to RCVRY, but nothing
    happened.

    3) Tried Config, and when the PC booted up it immediately told me the
    PC was a 3.2 GHz system. Yay, I thought, I've "fixed" it.

    4) Reboot with jumper in normal - nothing; PC is back to 1.6

    5) Tried the config jumper again, and I see that the BIOS setup screen
    now has an extra screen - maintenance. Never seen this before. Open
    this up.

    6) There it has something called "CPU Frequency", with default set at
    8 to 1. Mmm, I ponder - I wonder... So I change it to 12 to 1, reboot,
    and the PC is now a 2.4 GHz C something or other.

    7) Reboot, try a bit of logic = if 8 to 1 is 1.6 GHz, then twice as
    much *should* be 3.2 GHz, surely?

    8) Surely - on reboot the PC is back to 3.2 GHz. Mmmmm, thinks I,
    let's try 20 to 1 (well, who knows?)

    9) Won't reboot. Go back to 16 to 1, and the PC boots up fine - right
    now, working away, no problems. Still sitting in the green at 45
    degrees C as I look at it here.

    So - er - what did I do?

    * Was this the right thing to do?

    * Is this how one overclocks?

    * Why would it default to 8 to 1, when 16 to 1 appears to be right?

    * Why did it default to 8 to 1 anyway - none of my other PCs has ever
    done this over the years.

    Thanks for pointing me in the right direction (if, indeed, it *is* the
    right direction!)
     
    John Here, Aug 30, 2003
    #12
  13. John Here

    John Here Guest

    Took all the suggestions here, mixed it up, did some illogical jumps
    of my own, and it's back to 3.2 GHz again.

    Here's what I did - rightly or wrongly (I'm keeping on eye on
    temperature just in case - right now "Processor Zone" is at 46 degrees
    C, and the two "System Zones" at 37 and 38 degrees):

    1) Opened the box, looking for the CMOS jumper. The board doesn't have
    one! It's got the space for one, but all that's there are two neat
    little solder points. I thought of "short circuiting" it myself with a
    piece of wire, but rejected that after a few milliseconds. Probably
    wise?

    2) Right next to the CMOS points on the motherboard, however, was a
    "BIOS CONFIG" jumper, with three settings: Normal, Config, and RCVRY
    (which I assume to be "recovery"). So I set it to RCVRY, but nothing
    happened.

    3) Tried Config, and when the PC booted up it immediately told me the
    PC was a 3.2 GHz system. Yay, I thought, I've "fixed" it.

    4) Reboot with jumper in normal - nothing; PC is back to 1.6

    5) Tried the config jumper again, and I see that the BIOS setup screen
    now has an extra screen - maintenance. Never seen this before. Open
    this up.

    6) There it has something called "CPU Frequency", with default set at
    8 to 1. Mmm, I ponder - I wonder... So I change it to 12 to 1, reboot,
    and the PC is now a 2.4 GHz C something or other.

    7) Reboot, try a bit of logic = if 8 to 1 is 1.6 GHz, then twice as
    much *should* be 3.2 GHz, surely?

    8) Surely - on reboot the PC is back to 3.2 GHz. Mmmmm, thinks I,
    let's try 20 to 1 (well, who knows?)

    9) Won't reboot. Go back to 16 to 1, and the PC boots up fine - right
    now, working away, no problems. Still sitting in the green at 45
    degrees C as I look at it here.

    So - er - what did I do?

    * Was this the right thing to do?

    * Is this how one overclocks?

    * Why would it default to 8 to 1, when 16 to 1 appears to be right?

    * Why did it default to 8 to 1 anyway - none of my other PCs has ever
    done this over the years.

    Thanks for pointing me in the right direction (if, indeed, it *is* the
    right direction!)
     
    John Here, Aug 31, 2003
    #13
  14. John Here

    Guess Who Guest

    Here's a little tip for you, the RECOVERY option is to recover the BIOS in
    case of catastrophe. In this mode, it will attempt to boot off of a floppy
    with a recovery BIOS on it.

    What you should do, is download the latest recovery BIOS from the Intel
    site, it's listed there with the other BIOS updates. You just download the
    file and copy it on to a blank floppy disk. In the future, should your BIOS
    become corrupt and the system not bootable, you can flip this jumper to
    RECOVERY, insert the floppy, and turn on the system.

    Also, make sure to always set the jumper back to NORMAL mode. Did you set
    the jumper back? If not, do so.

    I'm glad you got it fixed. It was intriguing, to say the least. But now
    the question is, why did the multiplier change?
     
    Guess Who, Sep 1, 2003
    #14
  15. John Here

    TW Guest

    Thanks for the feedback - I did, in fact exactly what I was supposed
    to do, as Intel told me today.

    But - as you said - why did the multiplier change? Could it have been
    a "soft" change, from within XP?

    I wasn't messing around on the hardware side in any way until
    Saturday. But I do tend to tweak around quite a bit on the software
    side, usually when I have a lot of work to do.
     
    TW, Sep 1, 2003
    #15
  16. John Here

    TW Guest

    Will this work with a USB memory stick, or USB "SuperDrive", aka LS
    120? i don't habe a floppy drive....
     
    TW, Sep 1, 2003
    #16
  17. John Here

    lyon_wonder Guest

    Right now you can buy a 2.4GHz Celeron, a 2.4A GHz Pentium 4, a 2.4B GHz
    More confusing than Intel's 600MHz 66/100/133 Slot/Socket P3/Celerons.
     
    lyon_wonder, Sep 6, 2003
    #17
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