48-bit LBA Support - HDs Over 137GB - Advice?

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Rob Jones, Nov 29, 2003.

  1. Rob Jones

    Rob Jones Guest

    Hi I'm planning to upgrade to a 160GB HD however, I have read some info
    about recognition issues with MBs and XP. It appears that older MBs pre Jan
    1st 2003 do not have support for 48-bit LBA. XP will only read 137GB, no
    more.

    To be honest I cant remember when I bought mine but according to a list of
    Bios support for my MB (Asus A7N8X Deluxe) the Bios needed for the 48-bit
    LBA Support is 1001.C. Sandra Pro 2003 stated my Bios as:

    Asus A7N8X2.0 Deluxe ACPI Rev 1002 Beta 012
    Plug and Play version 1.00
    SMbios/DMI Version 2.20

    So am I in need of an update? To be honest, I would rather avoid updating
    the bios as I have never updated them and cant afford to replace the MB
    right now if it all goes pear shaped.

    Alternatively, I have been reading the Microsoft knowledge base about SP-1
    and changing the registry which I would prefer as I can always re-install
    Xp if it goes wrong. Would the reg fix work without a bios update?

    I understand that I cant have just the one partition on the HD as I wont be
    able to have a partition larger than 137GB but I partition my HDs any way
    so that will suit me well.

    Any advice would be most appreciated.
     
    Rob Jones, Nov 29, 2003
    #1
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  2. Rob Jones

    Ben Pope Guest

    I think thats on a per-partition basis, so you could create a partition
    thats <128GiB, and then another for the rest of the drive (or whatever)
    Thats a pretty old BIOS, I would recommend updating, but it should be new
    enough according to your info.
    Both BIOS and XP need to support 48bit addressing in order for it to work.
    Fine.

    Ben
     
    Ben Pope, Nov 29, 2003
    #2
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  3. Rob Jones

    Rob Jones Guest


    Hi Ben, thanks for the input, I use partition Magic 8, so I can install XP
    on say a 128 Gig Partition, then create more partitions using PM8 after I
    have installed XP?

    I would love to update but I have read so many horror stories of failed
    Bios updates I'm unsure about chancing it. I did read of a device call
    Bios savoir a while back that claimed it could back up your bios in case of
    it going wrong. Any thoughts? Is updating bios these days any safer?
     
    Rob Jones, Nov 29, 2003
    #3
  4. Rob Jones

    Shep© Guest

    Partition sizes are a limitation of the O/S.Drive sizes are a
    limitation of the hardware.If the full size of the drive is not seen
    by the BIOS then partitioning the drive will make no difference.There
    is an update for WinXP to be able to see and partition above 137 gig
    but this will not defeat a hardware limitation.Hardware limitations
    can be defeated in some cases by a BIOS update but if not then a
    Controller card and as a last resort as DDO(Dynamic Disk Overlay)
    program usually freely available from the drive maker's site if not
    already supplied with the drive.
    More info here,
    http://www.geocities.com/sheppola/hard.html

    If there is a BIOS update and you wish to flash the BIOS then find the
    correct flash program and BIOS .rom file and I'll make you a bootable
    CDR/W .ISO image which is a more secure way of flashing the BIOS than
    the older and less robust floppy disks.This presumes you have a CDR/W
    drive.




    --
    Free Windows/PC help,
    http://www.geocities.com/sheppola/trouble.html
    email shepATpartyheld.de
    Free songs download,
    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/8/nomessiahsmusic.htm
     
    Shep©, Nov 29, 2003
    #4
  5. Rob Jones

    Ben Pope Guest

    I don;t see why not, but I think Win2K likes to format every partition, so
    don;t make the other partitions until you;ve installed XP, or it might want
    to format them.
    It's not too bad, usully there is a bootloader section that is not usually
    flashed, allows you to flash a new BIOS even if part of it is corrupted.

    It's still easy to FUBAR the motherboard - pulling power mid flash is the
    most likely route to failure, or flashing in Windows, we all know it's prone
    to crashing at the least opportune moment.

    I've flashed the BIOS on my A7N8X Deluxe Rev2.0 several times and not had a
    problem, I usually either use the built in awdflash or awdflash on a floppy.

    http://www.ben.pope.name/a7n8x_faq.html#BIOS_Flash

    I think for many of those that have had problems when flashing, they found
    that clearing cmos worked. If you happily change settings in the BIOS and
    the machine restarts/powers on properly every time you should be ok.

    BIOS saviour is basically two flash chips that you can swap between, it's
    quite a good idea.

    Ben
     
    Ben Pope, Nov 29, 2003
    #5
  6. Rob Jones

    Egil Solberg Guest

    Your mobo supports >137GB drives with any BIOS. You need to install WinXP
    SP1 for XP to find the drive right. Enough said.
    ..
     
    Egil Solberg, Nov 29, 2003
    #6
  7. Rob Jones

    Rob Jones Guest

    Hi Shep, thanks for the info, by controller card, do you mean this:

    http://tinyurl.com/wziy

    I was thinking about buying one (I have plenty of PCI slots free) and at
    this price I can afford it. If it is the right hardware, how will it work
    with my existing MB IDE channels. Does it take over as the default IDE
    controller away from the Mb or is it supplementary?

    Also, what about booting off the card? Can you install XP on a partition
    and boot from the card? What about Bios impact, are the bios changed by
    the card, do you have to install some sort of program to change the bios?

    Sorry for all the questions but any help would be appreciated as if
    installing this card solves the problem, I'll willingly buy it to save time
    effort.



    and as a last resort as DDO(Dynamic Disk Overlay)
    Thanks I'll take a look
    Thanks for the offer but I know so little about bios updating atm that I
    think I'm going to have to read more first!
     
    Rob Jones, Nov 29, 2003
    #7
  8. Rob Jones

    Egil Solberg Guest

    You don't need one. You have a serialATA controller and onboard
    PATA-controller. That should be enough for most persons.
     
    Egil Solberg, Nov 29, 2003
    #8
  9. Rob Jones

    Rob Jones Guest

    Thanks Ben, I take a look at your page and have a good read.
     
    Rob Jones, Nov 29, 2003
    #9
  10. Rob Jones

    Rob Jones Guest

    Thanks for the info Egil.
     
    Rob Jones, Nov 29, 2003
    #10
  11. Rob Jones

    Rob Jones Guest

    Hi again Egil, I'm going for the 160GB drive anyway so will install Xp and
    SP-1 and go from there before considering about hardware add on's.
     
    Rob Jones, Nov 29, 2003
    #11
  12. Rob Jones

    Shep© Guest

    As per other posts.You are good to go with what you have except to
    install the XP update.
    One advantage of a controller card though is that you can have more
    devices on separate IDE chains but with your system being so modern
    you most likely don't need one even for this :)




    --
    Free Windows/PC help,
    http://www.geocities.com/sheppola/trouble.html
    email shepATpartyheld.de
    Free songs download,
    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/8/nomessiahsmusic.htm
     
    Shep©, Nov 29, 2003
    #12
  13. Rob Jones

    Rob Jones Guest

    Thanks Shep, I have plenty to keep me busy now :)
     
    Rob Jones, Nov 29, 2003
    #13
  14. Rob Jones

    Gus Guest

    Look here..its rather lengthy..

    How to Enable 48-bit Logical Block Addressing Support for ATAPI Disk Drives
    in Windows XP
    The information in this article applies to:
    a.. Microsoft Windows XP Professional
    b.. Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
    This article was previously published under Q303013
    IMPORTANT: This article contains information about modifying the registry.
    Before you modify the registry, make sure to back it up and make sure that
    you understand how to restore the registry if a problem occurs. For
    information about how to back up, restore, and edit the registry, click the
    following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge
    Base:
    256986 Description of the Microsoft Windows Registry

    SUMMARY
    This article describes the Windows XP 48-bit Logical Block Addressing (LBA)
    support for ATA Packet Interface (ATAPI) disk drives that can enable the
    capacity of your hard disk to exceed the current 137 gigabyte (GB) limit.

    NOTE: 48-bit LBA support will not be enabled and therefore supported until
    Service Pack 1 (SP1) for Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP Professional
    is officially released and installed. Manually enabling 48-bit LBA support
    on Windows XP Without SP1 installed could lead to potential data loss.

    For additional information about the latest service pack for Windows XP,
    click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft
    Knowledge Base:
    322389 How to Obtain the Latest Windows XP Service Pack

    MORE INFORMATION
    WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
    problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft
    cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry
    Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

    Windows XP includes 48-bit LBA support for ATAPI disk drives that can enable
    the capacity of your hard disk to exceed the current 137 GB limit. This type
    of support is new technology and Microsoft has only tested a limited number
    of these disk drives. By default, Windows XP Home Edition and Windows XP
    Professional do not have 48-bit LBA support enabled.

    You must meet the following requirements to use 48-bit LBA ATAPI support:
    a.. You must have a 48-bit LBA compatible BIOS.
    b.. You must have a hard disk that has a capacity that is greater than 137
    GB.
    c.. You must have Windows XP installed.
    d.. For Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP Professional, you must
    enable the support in the registry by adding or changing the registry value,
    EnableBigLba, to 1 in the following registry:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Atapi\Parameters\

    WARNING: By default 48-bit LBA ATAPI support on Windows XP Home Edition and
    Professional is unavailable. Users must add the registry key mentioned
    earlier to make this addressing available to access disk space beyond the
    first 137GB. Data corruption can occur if previous versions of Windows that
    do not support 48-bit LBA out of the box (for example, Windows 2000 or
    earlier) are installed on a disk partition that was previously created by a
    48-bit aware operating system such as Windows XP that is greater in size or
    spans the current addressable limit of 137GB. NOTE: This includes Windows XP
    RTM versions. By default, the behavior does not occur in Windows XP RTM.
    Also note that if you manually turn on 48-bit LBA support on Windows XP
    without Service Pack 1 installed, you may cause data loss.

    To enable 48-bit LBA large-disk support in the registry:
    1.. Start Registry Editor (Regedt32.exe).
    2.. Locate and click the following key in the registry:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Atapi\Parameters\

    3.. On the Edit menu, click Add Value, and then add the following registry
    value:
    Value name: EnableBigLba
    Data type: REG_DWORD
    Value data: 0x1

    4.. Quit Registry Editor.
    WARNING: By default 48-bit LBA ATAPI support on Windows XP Home Edition and
    Professional is unavailable. Users must add the registry key mentioned
    earlier to make this addressing available to access disk space beyond the
    first 137GB. Data corruption can occur if previous versions of Windows that
    do not support 48-bit LBA out of the box (for example, Windows 2000 or
    earlier) are installed on a disk partition that was previously created by a
    48-bit aware operating system such as Windows XP that is greater in size or
    spans the current addressable limit of 137GB. NOTE: This includes Windows XP
    RTM versions. By default, the behavior does not occur in Windows XP RTM.
    Also note that if you manually turn on 48-bit LBA support on Windows XP
    without Service Pack 1 installed, you may cause data loss.

    NOTE: If you attempt to enable the 48-bit LBA ATAPI support by editing the
    preceding registry setting and you did not meet the minimum requirements,
    you may observe the following behavior:
    a.. The registry value, EnableBigLba, is disabled:

    If you have a 48-bit compatible BIOS that can support a hard disk that has
    a capacity that is greater than 137 GB, only the first 137 GB of the hard
    disk are addressable. The remainder of the hard disk is not used.
    b.. The registry value, EnableBigLba, is enabled, but you do not have a
    48-bit LBA compatible BIOS and the capacity of the hard disk does not exceed
    137 GB:

    If you enable the 48-bit LBA ATAPI support by editing the registry
    setting, but you lack both a 48-bit LBA compatible BIOS and a hard disk that
    has a capacity that is greater than 137 GB, you have not changed the system.
    The hard disk continues to function as a standard hard disk.
    c.. The registry value, EnableBigLba, is enabled without a 48-bit LBA
    compatible BIOS, but you have a hard disk with a capacity that is larger
    than 137 GB:

    If you enable 48-bit ATAPI support in the registry and you have a hard
    disk that has a capacity that is greater than 137 GB, but you do not have a
    48-bit LBA compatible BIOS, only the first 137 GB of the hard disk are
    addressable. The remainder of the hard disk is not used.
    To enable 48-bit LBA support by means of an unattended installation with the
    Microsoft System Preparation (Sysprep) tool:
    1.. Copy the following text into Microsoft Windows Notepad and save the
    text as the 48bitLba.inf file:
    [version]
    signature="$CHICAGO$"
    SetupClass=BASE


    [DefaultInstall]
    AddReg=48bitlba.Add.Reg

    [48bitlba.Add.Reg]
    HKLM,"System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Atapi\Parameters","EnableBigLba",0x1
    0001,12.. Create a file named Cmdlines.txt, which includes the following
    lines:

    [Commands]
    "rundll32 setupapi,InstallHinfSection DefaultInstall 128 .\48BITLBA.INF"
    3.. Locate the Sysprep\I386 folder in the Sysprep image, and then create a
    $OEM$ subfolder in this folder.
    4.. Copy the 48bitlba.inf and Cmdlines.txt files into the
    Sysprep\I386\$OEM$ folder.
    5.. In your Sysprep.inf file, add a key named InstallFilesPath to the
    [Unattended] section. This key must have the following value:
    InstallFilesPath = "C:\sysprep\i386"
    To add the preceding settings to the Images folder, which had been created
    with the Riprep.exe program:
    1.. On the remote installation server that contains the Riprep image,
    create a Sysprep\I386\$OEM$ folder in the following folder:

    RemoteInstall\Setup\Language\Images\Riprep_dir_name\I386\Mirror1\UserData

    NOTE: The word "Language" in the preceding path reads "English" for the
    English language, and "Riprep_dir_name" is the unique name that you selected
    for the Riprep image.
    2.. Copy the 48bitlba.inf and Cmdlines.txt files into the $OEM$ folder.
    3.. Modify the Riprep.sif file in the
    RemoteInstall\Setup\Language\Images\Riprep_dir_name\I386\Templates\Riprep.si
    f folder (and any other template files for this Riprep image that you may
    have created), and then add the OemPreinstall and InstallFilesPath values so
    that they are set up as:

    [Unattended]
    OemPreinstall = "Yes"
    InstallFilesPath = "C:\sysprep\i386"
    4.. Close, and then save the file.
    OEMs have the ability to turn this support on by means of the Microsoft
    Windows OEM Preinstallation Kit.

    For more information, refer to the OEM Preinstallation Kit or the following
    Microsoft Web site:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=http://www.microsoft.com/oem


    Last Reviewed: 9/9/2002
    Keywords: kbAppCompatibility kbenv kbhowto kbWinXPsp1fix KB303013
     
    Gus, Nov 29, 2003
    #14
  15. Rob Jones

    Darkfalz Guest

    I would love to update but I have read so many horror stories of failed
    I've been flashing BIOSes (CDRW, Video card and mainboard) since 1998 and
    never had a problem once.
     
    Darkfalz, Nov 30, 2003
    #15
  16. Rob Jones

    Milleron Guest

    Interesting. Can you explain why it's better to flash from a CD than
    from a floppy?

    Ron
     
    Milleron, Nov 30, 2003
    #16
  17. Rob Jones

    Shep© Guest

    Shep©, Nov 30, 2003
    #17
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