8knxp, with or without dsp2 ?

Discussion in 'Gigabyte' started by steph, Sep 2, 2003.

  1. steph

    steph Guest

    Hi,
    I just read in corsair memory forum,that some guys
    solved all their instability problems removing
    the dsp2 card.......
    Any idee.. any comments....
    I have a crash problem when i shut the door of
    my case, is it that dsp2 module that has bad electric
    contacts with mainboard itself ???
    Actually no more blue srcreen but :
    i use: +0.2V in AGP bus (Radeon 9700 pro)
    +0.2V ram voltage (Corsair XMS 3200 used as 2-3-3-6 timing)
    I will read your comments.
     
    steph, Sep 2, 2003
    #1
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  2. steph

    S.Heenan Guest

    A fair number of users have chosen to remove the DPS2 daughter card due to
    stability problems. At stock speeds it's not usually necessary to increase
    CPU, RAM or AGP voltages for stability.
     
    S.Heenan, Sep 2, 2003
    #2
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  3. I for one, still have mine installed. The fan has been removed to make room
    for installing a Zalman all copper HSF which combined with two 80mm rear
    case fans provide more than enough air-flow to keep the DSP2 card cool.

    I've had no instability issues with this board at all.

    3.2Ghz,
    2gig Dual-channel DDR400,
    FX5900 Ultra,
    Audigy2 Platinum
    4 HD's
    DVD-RW
    CD-RW
    etc
    etc...
     
    Timothy Drouillard, Sep 3, 2003
    #3
  4. steph

    S.Heenan Guest

    Happy to hear it's worked well for you. In the case of the OP, he has some
    sort of mechanical problem if closing the door causes crashing or
    instability.
     
    S.Heenan, Sep 3, 2003
    #4
  5. Hmmmmmm

    closing a 'door' causing problems??

    that's a strange one. I can't picture any type of door or side panel that
    would cause a problem with the DSP2 simply by closing it.

    Unless it's the case side panel that is somehow pushing against internal
    cables somehow that in turn contacts the DSP2.

    The fit of the DSP2 in it's own socket does leave a bit to be desired as it
    has plenty of side to side play even though it's held into the socket with
    the spring clip.

    I was simply responding to the portion of the post that mentioned users
    reporting stability issues with the DSP2 installed.
     
    Timothy Drouillard, Sep 3, 2003
    #5
  6. steph

    Bob Davis Guest

    I'm not familiar with this function, but the bios has an option in the PC
    Health section called "Reset Case Open Status." It is vaguely described in
    the manual, but I gather than the computer will reset when the case is
    opened and the act will be noted in the bios, presumably if the case has
    some sort of switch to inform the mobo of this act. If so, where is the
    connector?

    Maybe someone could elaborate on this, and whether or not it may be related
    to the original question.

     
    Bob Davis, Sep 3, 2003
    #6
  7. There is a connector on the motherboard to connect the case open cable. Some
    cases have a cable inside that you connect to the mobo. Basically it beeps
    or in BIOS it displays a message....it's a gimmick kinda thing.

    I haven't seen any cases myself with this optional extra.
     
    Richard Dower, Sep 3, 2003
    #7
  8. 'Case Open' does not normally cause a system to reset.

    It's described on page 35 of the manual and points to connector #27, a 2-pin
    connector.

    This is typically used as a simple indicator that a case has been opened. A
    security indicator if you will.

    Now that's not to say that somehow by 'closing a door' on a system may
    somehow accidently cause something inside the case (perhaps a cable bundle
    or something) to move and either short out the reset connector on the MB or
    short out some other connector oe circuit path that causes the system to
    reset or shut down


     
    Timothy Drouillard, Sep 3, 2003
    #8
  9. steph

    steph Guest

    Thankx all.

    I found the problem now.

    I got a bad electic contact somewhere inside my antec
    power supply.
    When i move cables going out of it: it crashes.
    So, any mechanical perturbation, strong enough,
    makes all the pc down.
     
    steph, Sep 3, 2003
    #9
  10. steph

    Dodgy Guest

    What Bios version are you using?

    I have a pair of XMS3200LL 512Meg sticks running with the same timings
    as you on standard voltage. I also have an ATI AIW 8500DV again with
    standard voltages. This is on Bios F6a. I know there are newer
    versions, but you know the moto... If it ain't broke... :)

    It works with and without the DPS installed, although I currently have
    the DPS removed due to a rather large Zalman heatsink getting in the
    way.

    Dodgy.
     
    Dodgy, Sep 3, 2003
    #10
  11. steph

    John Guest

    I haven't seen any cases myself with this optional extra.

    My Thermaltake Xaser III V2000+ Case has this optional extra, connected it
    up but never really looked into what it does.
     
    John, Sep 3, 2003
    #11
  12. steph

    Sir Pudgie Guest

    I haven't seen any cases myself with this optional extra.

    Yeah, nor have I bar a few server cases. If you want to play with it though
    it's not too difficult to fit a microswitch somewhere that will contact when
    a panel is removed. ;-)
     
    Sir Pudgie, Sep 3, 2003
    #12
  13. steph

    Sandrah S Guest

    My DPS2 card came preinstalled in a barebones system that we just
    bought. The system is very unstable and reboots after 1-5 minutes of
    use. We would like to remove the DPS2 card, but it seems firmly in place
    and the manual diagram doesn't show the location of the spring clip
    which another message said holds the card in place. How do you get the
    card out??

    Thanks!
     
    Sandrah S, Sep 28, 2003
    #13
  14. steph

    Russell Guest

    The card is held in place by a flimsy silver-colored metal band that
    surrounds the edge of the card on three sides and fits to the card by having
    2 holes in the top 2 corners to allow the tops 2 corners of the card to
    slide in. It is held to the motherboard by 2 "hooks" that can be carefully
    pulled away from the 2 sides of the card, then lifted off. You can then
    pull the card off of the motherboard's slot.

    Russell
    http://tastycomputers.com
     
    Russell, Sep 28, 2003
    #14
  15. There is a thin metal clip that fits around the edge of the vertical circuit
    board. It's held in by the springy ends as they reach down to the socket on
    the MB. Spread the bottom legs of the clip and lift the DPS card out.

    I've left mine in since day 1 without any stability problems at all. Running
    a 3.2Ghz w2gig of DDR400 Dual-channel ram.
     
    Timothy Drouillard, Sep 28, 2003
    #15
  16. steph

    Tim Guest

    If its a new system and unstable, take it back!
    Systems should never go out the door like that. It is not your problem
    unless you bought As Is.
    - Tim
     
    Tim, Sep 28, 2003
    #16
  17. steph

    Muttley Guest

    I concur - Take it back and get the supplier to fix....

    John S.
     
    Muttley, Sep 28, 2003
    #17
  18. steph

    Sandrah S Guest

    Thanks, but the problem turned out to be an old Radeon video card. A new
    Radeon solved the problem. The new one is the 9000 and it is an All In
    Wonder.
     
    Sandrah S, Oct 3, 2003
    #18
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