a major difference between Jobs and Cook

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Michelle Steiner, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. Notice how low key the introduction to Mountain Lion has been? If Steve
    Jobs had still been there, and healthy, there would have been a major press
    event at the Yerba Buena Center, the auditorium at Apple's headquarters, or
    some other, similar venue,

    The event would have had Jobs front and center with a Keynote presentation
    on the big screen behind him, and various developers showing off their
    products that take advantage of the new functions and features of Snow
    Leopard.

    There would have been a cryptic invitation issued a week or two ago, and
    there would have been all sorts of speculation here and on the rumor and
    news sites.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 16, 2012
    #1
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  2. Michelle Steiner

    Guest Guest

    or maybe it's because they're preparing for an ipad and ios event. macs
    aren't their bread&butter anymore. when snow leopard was announced,
    ipads didn't exist, let alone outsell them by a wide margin.
     
    Guest, Feb 16, 2012
    #2
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  3. or maybe it's because they're preparing for an ipad and ios event. macs
    aren't their bread&butter anymore. when snow leopard was announced,
    ipads didn't exist, let alone outsell them by a wide margin.[/QUOTE]

    Macs may not be their bread and butter any more, but they're still a
    significant portion of their product mix and income.

    I really do think it's a matter of the difference in style between Cook and
    Jobs. But time will tell.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 16, 2012
    #3
  4. Michelle Steiner

    Alan Browne Guest

    I don't recall much in the way of a hint before Lion other than the
    Back-to-Mac reference. And then one day the Lion page appeared on the
    Apple site.

    The 'rumour' at present is the iPad "3" for March 7. That hasn't
    shifted much in the last week.
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 16, 2012
    #4
  5. Michelle Steiner

    Alan Browne Guest

    FY 2012 1st quarter sales up 22% (laptops and desktops combined) v. the
    year earlier quarter. $6.6B in the first quarter of this FY.

    In revenue, income and growth terms, if the Mac was a standalone
    business ($26B/yr) it would be a major shareholder darling.

    To be sure there has been some "halo" from the iPod/iPhone to accelerate
    that.
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 16, 2012
    #5
  6. That's really just a tactical issue, one I suspect is not too important.
    The first key strategic difference I've seen is that Tim's first two key
    hires have been people from outside the organization. No more earn your
    stripes for 10-15 years while being immersed in the Apple Way.
     
    Douglas C. Neidermeyer, Feb 16, 2012
    #6
  7. Jobs had many key hires from outside Apple, Tim Cook himself being one of
    them. Ron Johnson, who set up the Apple Stores, was another.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 17, 2012
    #7
  8. Michelle Steiner

    Guest Guest

    <http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/16/apple-sold-more-ios-devices-in-2011-
    than-it-sold-macs-in-almost-30-years/>

    Asymco's Horace Dediu noticed a startling statistic: Apple sold 156
    million iOS devices in 2011. That's 30 million more than the 122
    million Macs that Apple has sold since the first one went on sale in
    1984.
     
    Guest, Feb 17, 2012
    #8

  9. You're being very literal minded-- of course any hire except a college
    freshout is from "outside". Cook and Johnson were cadets when hired.
    They grew up/matured as managers at Apple.
     
    Douglas C. Neidermeyer, Feb 17, 2012
    #9
  10. Michelle Steiner

    George Kerby Guest

    Mr. Jobs would have come up with another name besides the lame "Mountian
    Lion", which is just another way to say "Cougar".

    "Domestic Shorthair" would have been nice!
     
    George Kerby, Feb 17, 2012
    #10
  11. Hardly. Cook had been VP for Corporate Materials at Compaq; that's hardly
    a "cadet" position. Before that he was COO of Intelligent Electronics, and
    before that, he was the director of North American Fulfillment at IBM. He
    was a seasoned professional when he joined Apple.

    Before Johnson was hired by Apple he was Senior Merchandising Executive at
    Target, and had worked there for a dozen years. He was primarily
    responsible for the look, feel, and operations of the Apple retail stores;
    that's not a job given to a "cadet".

    But hey, don't let facts get in the way of your beliefs.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 17, 2012
    #11
  12. Michelle Steiner

    Alan Browne Guest

    I'm sure even you see that the unit revenue of Macs is higher than iOS
    devices.

    The point remains that Macs are a very valuable business in their own right.
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 17, 2012
    #12
  13. Michelle Steiner

    JF Mezei Guest


    I suspect that Apple already has an internal roadmaps of how many more
    versions of OS-X will needed before OSX becomes so similar to IOS that
    Apple will use IOS as source code base for desktops/laptops.

    My prediction is that Apple is moving to be more of a Sony than an IBM.
    Consumer electronics instead of computers.
     
    JF Mezei, Feb 17, 2012
    #13
  14. Michelle Steiner

    JF Mezei Guest


    When a company grows to a certain size, the ccountants unfortunatly gain
    power over the visionaries.

    And accountants look at growth poetntial for OS-X vs growth potential
    for IOS.

    Desktop is a business expected to disapear and shring while mobile and
    consumer gadgets is expected to skyrocket for apple.
     
    JF Mezei, Feb 17, 2012
    #14
  15. Is expected by whom? In addition to yourself, that is.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 17, 2012
    #15
  16. Michelle Steiner

    JF Mezei Guest


    While Apple's desktop sales are growing, the overall market is not. So
    Apple would know that. Jobs even mentioned it a few times that the
    future was in mobile devices.

    Lets face it, CPU and GPU horsepower have now reached a level when you
    don't need to upgrade every 2 years to run the latest application. (like
    it used to be). And the era of Y2K spending is over. It used to be that
    people would run to a store to get the latest version of windows so they
    could get ride the the awfull one that kept crashing. Now, people have
    been happy on XP for ages. In fact, one miscalulation by Microsoft is
    that people would still be willing to trash their PC and buy a new one
    that could run Vista.

    And market penetration for desktops in the western world is fairly
    complete. In developing nations, price pressures makes desktop not too
    profitable and the big guys let the chinese fill that market.
     
    JF Mezei, Feb 18, 2012
    #16

  17. While Apple's desktop sales are growing, the overall market is not. So
    Apple would know that. Jobs even mentioned it a few times that the
    future was in mobile devices.[/QUOTE]

    I see; Apple's desktop business is growing, so therefore Apple expects it
    to disappear.

    BTW, have you ever heard of business cycles?
    It never was, at least with the Mac it never was. Historically, Mac owners
    bought new computers every four to five years.

    But you didn't answer my question: Who expects desktops to disappear?
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 18, 2012
    #17
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