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Airflow simulation for pc cases ;)

Discussion in 'Nvidia' started by Skybuck Flying, Oct 3, 2009.

  1. Hello,

    So far gpu's seem to be very good at "particle simulations".

    One interesting application could be "airflow simulations for pc cases" ;)
    :)

    So next time I am interested in buying a pc case... I simply download a 3D
    model of it...

    Active some fans in it... <- would be cool...

    And then I could see the airflow in action in 3D preferably realtime... to
    know if it's a good case or not ! ;)

    And hopefully the simulation will be realistic ! ;) :)

    Doesn't seem to though to do ?

    Must know theory about air flow equations or so ?

    Any theory out there ? ;) :)

    Otherwise wing it ! ;) =D

    Also if heat equations could be added even better ! ;)

    Bye,
    Skybuck =D
     
    Skybuck Flying, Oct 3, 2009
    #1
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  2. Skybuck Flying

    trodas

    Joined:
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    Worse - heat dissipating depend very much on the surface of heated things ;) And the air flow depend on the surface properties too. There are plenty of variables to consider, to do it properly. When I calculated mine passive radiator for watercooling, I used this tool:
    frigprim.com/online/natconv_heatsink.html

    Just to give you a idea, how hard this is ;)
     
    trodas, Oct 6, 2009
    #2
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  3. SF is a troll who babbles and crossposts. Please ignore him or trim your
    replies so the OpenGL newsgroup can stay clear of rubbish.

    FU's trimmed to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
     
    Charles E Hardwidge, Oct 8, 2009
    #3
  4. Skybuck Flying

    Rui Maciel Guest

    If you want to model something then you must know how it behaves. So, yes.
    You could take a look at fluid dynamics implementations of the finite element method.


    Rui Maciel
     
    Rui Maciel, Oct 8, 2009
    #4
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