1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

AMD Barton 2800 and Shuttle AK37 mobo problem

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by joe m, Dec 31, 2005.

  1. joe m

    joe m Guest

    Decided to take the 1 ghz amd chip out my AK37GT mobo and switch it out
    with a Barton 2800.

    Was successful getting the chip to work at 100 X 12.5. Also,
    successful at getting chipto work at 133 X 12.5. All other bios setups
    left at default (which for some reason the defaulut voltage for the
    chip was 1.75 - I expected it to be 1.5 v).

    However, when I went to a 166 X 12.5 to hopefully get a 2 ghz out of
    the chip... it shut down. I can not reset the bios because it will not
    boot. Pulling the CMOS BIOS jumper pin didn't work either. The fans
    barely start for a few seconds... then - nothing.

    Any Ideas... or, did I probably damage the CPU?

    BTW, spec. for the mobo says it will go to 200/266 (unofficially 333 as
    well). In the bios setup, it only allows for a max FBS of 200. The
    chip is brand new ...bot from newegg.

    Joe

    BTW, using PC2700 DDR SDRAM 166mhz
     
    joe m, Dec 31, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. joe m

    nos1eep Guest

    It is further alleged that on or about 31 Dec 2005 06:45:31 -0800, in
    alt.comp.hardware.overclocking, the queezy keyboard of "joe m"
    <> spewed the following:

    |Decided to take the 1 ghz amd chip out my AK37GT mobo and switch it out
    |with a Barton 2800.
    |
    |Was successful getting the chip to work at 100 X 12.5. Also,
    |successful at getting chipto work at 133 X 12.5. All other bios setups
    |left at default (which for some reason the defaulut voltage for the
    |chip was 1.75 - I expected it to be 1.5 v).
    |
    |However, when I went to a 166 X 12.5 to hopefully get a 2 ghz out of
    |the chip... it shut down. I can not reset the bios because it will not
    |boot. Pulling the CMOS BIOS jumper pin didn't work either. The fans
    |barely start for a few seconds... then - nothing.
    |
    |Any Ideas... or, did I probably damage the CPU?
    |
    |BTW, spec. for the mobo says it will go to 200/266 (unofficially 333 as
    |well). In the bios setup, it only allows for a max FBS of 200. The
    |chip is brand new ...bot from newegg.
    |
    |Joe
    |
    |BTW, using PC2700 DDR SDRAM 166mhz

    It's a nice board but it will not run with that processor (without a
    BIOS update). This processor uses 1.65v and system bus is 333mhz
    You will need DDR333 or DDR400.
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/mainboards/display/shuttle-ak37gtr.html
    http://www.amdboard.com/amdid.html
    You abused it, hopefully everything will work out for you. I would try
    reinstalling the original processor and see what happens. It nothing
    then the thing is toast.


    --

    -nos1eep

    One night at Cheers, Cliff Clavin explained the "Buffalo Theory”
    to his buddy, Norm. "Well ya see, Norm, it's like this. A herd
    of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when
    the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back
    that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd
    as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group
    keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members. In
    much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the
    slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, as we know,
    kills brain cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest
    brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer
    eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and
    more efficient machine! That's why you always feel smarter after
    a few beers.
     
    nos1eep, Dec 31, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. joe m

    joe m Guest

    Bios was updated per shuttle site to accomodate Barton 2800...
    effective clock for was 333mhz...

    Core voltage was 1.65v
    I/O voltage 1.6

    My best guess is that I shorted out the mobo... nothing but a few
    seconds of fan spin before it stops.... even after replacing old cpu...
    unplugged everthing but basics on mobo... tried a different power
    supply (currently use 400 watt zpower)... and same results.

    Specs reflected that 166mhz FSB is acceptable for the mobo... worked at
    100 and 133 with default multiplier of 12.5. Only change made from
    default settings was FSB. 133 to 166 increase seemed to have shorted
    out the mobo... I THINK... anyother ideas?

    Joe
     
    joe m, Dec 31, 2005
    #3
  4. joe m

    nos1eep Guest

    It is further alleged that on or about 31 Dec 2005 11:07:30 -0800, in
    alt.comp.hardware.overclocking, the queezy keyboard of "joe m"
    <> spewed the following:

    |Bios was updated per shuttle site to accomodate Barton 2800...
    |effective clock for was 333mhz...
    |
    |Core voltage was 1.65v
    |I/O voltage 1.6
    |
    |My best guess is that I shorted out the mobo... nothing but a few
    |seconds of fan spin before it stops.... even after replacing old cpu...
    |unplugged everthing but basics on mobo... tried a different power
    |supply (currently use 400 watt zpower)... and same results.
    |
    |Specs reflected that 166mhz FSB is acceptable for the mobo... worked at
    |100 and 133 with default multiplier of 12.5. Only change made from
    |default settings was FSB. 133 to 166 increase seemed to have shorted
    |out the mobo... I THINK... anyother ideas?

    No d00d, sounds like it's pretty much fucked. Happy New Year, eh.
    Before you take a hammer to it, you may want another opinion, wait a
    bit and you will get it.
    --

    -nos1eep

    One night at Cheers, Cliff Clavin explained the "Buffalo Theory”
    to his buddy, Norm. "Well ya see, Norm, it's like this. A herd
    of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when
    the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back
    that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd
    as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group
    keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members. In
    much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the
    slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, as we know,
    kills brain cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest
    brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer
    eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and
    more efficient machine! That's why you always feel smarter after
    a few beers.
     
    nos1eep, Dec 31, 2005
    #4
  5. joe m

    joe m Guest

    You're far to negative... it looks like a new PC mobo to me... Hmmm...
    to 64 or not to 64 that is the question

    I am going to miss that mobo... maybe someone will come up with another
    option...

    Joe
     
    joe m, Dec 31, 2005
    #5
  6. joe m

    nos1eep Guest

    It is further alleged that on or about 31 Dec 2005 13:02:25 -0800, in
    alt.comp.hardware.overclocking, the queezy keyboard of "joe m"
    <> spewed the following:

    |You're far to negative... it looks like a new PC mobo to me... Hmmm...
    |to 64 or not to 64 that is the question

    <does happy dance>
    Oh yeah, uh-huh, oh baby, it's goo-ood!
    |
    |I am going to miss that mobo... maybe someone will come up with another
    |option...

    Think AN8 you will not find a single bad review as long as you steer
    clear of the Intel version.
    --

    -nos1eep

    One night at Cheers, Cliff Clavin explained the "Buffalo Theory”
    to his buddy, Norm. "Well ya see, Norm, it's like this. A herd
    of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when
    the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back
    that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd
    as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group
    keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members. In
    much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the
    slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, as we know,
    kills brain cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest
    brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer
    eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and
    more efficient machine! That's why you always feel smarter after
    a few beers.
     
    nos1eep, Dec 31, 2005
    #6
  7. joe m

    dannysdailys Guest

    joe mwrote
    Bios was updated per shuttle site to accomodate Barton 2800..
    I really don't think you shorted out the mobo

    Since you've been screwing around with it, were you sure to plug i
    the CPU fan into it's plug one? It sound like your CPU protectio
    kicked on if it didn't sense a fan at one. I know it's probably no
    that simple, but check to make sure it didn't fall off or something

    Sometimes, to clear the bios, you need to take serious measures. I'v
    never had problems with Shuttles however. But it's worth a shot

    For a stubborn one, I unplug the power cord, hit the front powe
    button to "blow" out the capaciters, pull out the cmos battery, the
    clear with the jumpers. I've never had this not work

    Hope this help

    Try tha
     
    dannysdailys, Dec 31, 2005
    #7
  8. joe m

    joe m Guest

    hmmm... you mentioned "hit the front power
    button to "blow" out the capaciters"... haven't tried that... but, did
    remove power cable, moved the jumpers to clear cmos plus removed
    battery.

    I hope your right about not blowing the mobo... I was also think that
    it may be shorting out against the case.... this heatsink is one of
    those push and pry type heatsinks ... i.e., no level... so, I've had to
    flex the mobo quite a bit during this process... I really hate those
    kind of heat sink designs.

    Joe
     
    joe m, Dec 31, 2005
    #8
  9. They usually have a little slot on the end of the spring clip you're
    supposed to use an appropriately sized screw driver blade in to push down
    and hinge it out.
     
    David Maynard, Dec 31, 2005
    #9
  10. joe m

    nos1eep Guest

    It is further alleged that on or about Sat, 31 Dec 2005 16:06:32
    -0600, in alt.comp.hardware.overclocking, the queezy keyboard of David
    Maynard <> spewed the following:

    |joe m wrote:
    |> hmmm... you mentioned "hit the front power
    |> button to "blow" out the capaciters"... haven't tried that... but, did
    |> remove power cable, moved the jumpers to clear cmos plus removed
    |> battery.
    |>
    |> I hope your right about not blowing the mobo... I was also think that
    |> it may be shorting out against the case.... this heatsink is one of
    |> those push and pry type heatsinks ... i.e., no level... so, I've had to
    |> flex the mobo quite a bit during this process... I really hate those
    |> kind of heat sink designs.
    |
    |They usually have a little slot on the end of the spring clip you're
    |supposed to use an appropriately sized screw driver blade in to push down
    |and hinge it out.

    Have you ever had a screwdriver slip, Dave. I have, and now I use a
    wooden dowel. I hate buying my clients new mobos.
    --

    -nos1eep

    One night at Cheers, Cliff Clavin explained the "Buffalo Theory”
    to his buddy, Norm. "Well ya see, Norm, it's like this. A herd
    of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when
    the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back
    that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd
    as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group
    keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members. In
    much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the
    slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, as we know,
    kills brain cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest
    brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer
    eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and
    more efficient machine! That's why you always feel smarter after
    a few beers.
     
    nos1eep, Dec 31, 2005
    #10
  11. joe m

    joe m Guest

    Problem solved...

    Thxs to all that posted...

    The problem was actually very simple to solve... it seems the power
    button on the front was the problem... while I was using the power
    switch on the power supply to turn the PC on... for some reason, it was
    the cold boot button in the front that had somehow inhibited the boot.
    And I simply had to hold it down for longer than usual (about 15
    seconds) then turn on from power supply switch... THEN, push the cold
    boot button on the front. Started right up. It really had to be done in
    that particular order AFTER I had reset the bios w/battery removed.

    Moral to this story... post and yea shall recieve. Second moral,
    computers are God's greatest gift AND curse.

    On a more practically level, the moral is that the AK37GT mobo
    advertises a 266 FSB max... but it seems to have a funky default cpu
    voltage of 1.75 per the bios... but, actually runs at 1.7 core voltage
    on a 1Ghz Athlon Tbird... and, when you use a Barton chip, it runs at
    1.65 core voltage. Just a WAG, but I think it's this voltage quirk that
    might make it not possible to run this particular mobo shut down when
    you try an push it to a 166 mhz FSB. Until I figure this out, I'll just
    run it at 133 and if I get couragious to mess with the multiplier to
    get the chip to run at or close to 2 gig. Anyone have any settings
    combinations that work with the Barton 2800 and AK37GT combination?

    Sidenote: The temp on the AK37GT with the Athlon Tbird actually runs at
    a steady 51c temp range... while the Barton runs at a lower 49-50c temp
    range. AND, that is in an idle-like state... no heavy processing.

    Lesson learned... I am very new to this overclocking thing and I'm not
    sure it's as much fun as some think. No tough decision as to what new
    kind of mobo to buy... rats!

    Joe
     
    joe m, Jan 1, 2006
    #11
  12. joe m

    ~misfit~ Guest

    I've had a screwdriver slip once, on an old-style clip. Luckilly the board
    still worked fine but it scared me a bit. However, all the newer clips I've
    seen have little 'lips' each side of the slot to prevent the 'driver from
    slipping out sideways and another bit of a flap to stop it slipping out
    forwards. I think that's why David said "an approptiately sized screw
    driver". If you use one that fits perfectly it's pretty damn difficult to
    mess up, you'd need to be high on PCP or something.

    BTW, if I am fitting one of the older style of clip without the anti-slip
    bits I put a bit of card on the mobo so, if it does slip out, the 'driver
    doesn't come in direct contact with the board.
     
    ~misfit~, Jan 1, 2006
    #12
  13. Not when I was using the right screw driver.

    How do you get a wooden dowel in the slot?
     
    David Maynard, Jan 1, 2006
    #13
  14. Bingo. A perceptive reader ;)

    It's not at all obvious from the meager instructions, such as they are,
    that many provide, and then there are those that seem to intend the use of
    a socket on a 'pin' off the end, but they apparently adhere to the Cyrano
    Jones philosophy of not providing maintenance manuals with Tribbles
    because, if they did, what would happen to mankind's search for knowledge?

    Seems the 'search' is the priority.
     
    David Maynard, Jan 1, 2006
    #14
  15. joe m

    P2B Guest

    I use a socket driver rather than a screwdriver - no chance of slippage
    regardless of clip design.

    P2B
     
    P2B, Jan 1, 2006
    #15
  16. joe m

    nos1eep Guest

    It is further alleged that on or about Sun, 01 Jan 2006 02:01:53
    -0600, in alt.comp.hardware.overclocking, the queezy keyboard of David
    Maynard <> spewed the following:

    |nos1eep wrote:
    |> It is further alleged that on or about Sat, 31 Dec 2005 16:06:32
    |> -0600, in alt.comp.hardware.overclocking, the queezy keyboard of David
    |> Maynard <> spewed the following:
    |>
    |> |joe m wrote:
    |> |> hmmm... you mentioned "hit the front power
    |> |> button to "blow" out the capaciters"... haven't tried that... but, did
    |> |> remove power cable, moved the jumpers to clear cmos plus removed
    |> |> battery.
    |> |>
    |> |> I hope your right about not blowing the mobo... I was also think that
    |> |> it may be shorting out against the case.... this heatsink is one of
    |> |> those push and pry type heatsinks ... i.e., no level... so, I've had to
    |> |> flex the mobo quite a bit during this process... I really hate those
    |> |> kind of heat sink designs.
    |> |
    |> |They usually have a little slot on the end of the spring clip you're
    |> |supposed to use an appropriately sized screw driver blade in to push down
    |> |and hinge it out.
    |>
    |> Have you ever had a screwdriver slip, Dave. I have, and now I use a
    |> wooden dowel. I hate buying my clients new mobos.
    |
    |Not when I was using the right screw driver.
    |
    |How do you get a wooden dowel in the slot?

    The dowel that I use is a 3mm dia stick of extremely flexible hard
    wood, has a rather blunt chisel point on it and it fits the slot
    nicely, thank you. It's original use was for some kind of hair
    contraption for women. I use it because I have postural tremors
    assosiated with an affliction and shake like a dog shitting peach
    pits. Adaptive tooling.
    --

    -nos1eep

    One night at Cheers, Cliff Clavin explained the "Buffalo Theory”
    to his buddy, Norm. "Well ya see, Norm, it's like this. A herd
    of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when
    the herd is hunted, it is the slowest and weakest ones at the back
    that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd
    as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group
    keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members. In
    much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the
    slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, as we know,
    kills brain cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest
    brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer
    eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and
    more efficient machine! That's why you always feel smarter after
    a few beers.
     
    nos1eep, Jan 1, 2006
    #16
  17. joe m

    dannysdailys Guest

    joe mwrote:
    Problem solved...
    Told you the mobo was good. I'm glad. I'm also glad I got you
    messing with your front power button.

    If you go to your settings in the bios, you'll see setting for that
    button. No doubt, you were skipping it into sleep mode, instead of
    boot up.

    Disable sleep mode in the bios and tell it that pushing and holding
    the button = power off. Pushing this, will actually cause Windows to
    exit and the computer to shut down. I just use a shutdown icon on the
    screen. But, it's better to be set like that, then the default sleep
    mode I believe the Shuttle is set at.

    Sleep mode in the power button, caused me all kinds of hassle and it
    sounds like it's doing it to you. Disable it and reset your
    multiplier, it should run fine for you.

    Lucky you had another computer to talk to us with, while yours was
    down. Always a big help.

    The Athlon T-bird (I still have two out) always runs hotter then the
    Barton. The T-birds were a first of their kind and Intel probably
    wishes they'd blown up AMD's plant. Intel is in for a very rocky
    road. And it all started with the T-bird. They just fly!

    I tuned up one of my 1.2's a couple of weeks ago, it's used in a
    family environment so it's always full of crap. Even full of crap,
    the computer ran really well. I almost got teary eyed. LOL

    Go Athlon!!!
     
    dannysdailys, Jan 1, 2006
    #17
  18. That works if the 'ledge', or whatever you want to call it, is on the
    exterior side of the clip but some have it bumped inwards. I.E. the outer
    surface is perfectly smooth with a small punched square/rectangular hole
    and the ledge on the inside. The screwdriver tip goes through the hole and
    can't go down past that inside ledge, which is slightly lower than the
    bottom of the hole so the tip is captured. And some have no 'ledge'
    whatsoever, just a hole, so that, depending on the geometry of the
    screwdriver blade you use, it may not go into the slot deep enough for a
    good capture.

    The worst ones are where the heatsink body overlaps too much so that the
    angle makes it virtually impossible to lever the clip outwards and those
    are where the potential for slip is most prominent. I've had to use a
    second tool prying the bottom end away from the socket while pushing it
    down with the screwdriver.
     
    David Maynard, Jan 1, 2006
    #18
  19. Ah. When you said dowel I envisioned, well, a dowel but that explains it.

    Sounds like an interesting tool and I might be inclined to try one if I had
    any idea what it was and how to get it.
     
    David Maynard, Jan 1, 2006
    #19
  20. joe m

    nos1eep Guest

    It is further alleged that on or about Sun, 01 Jan 2006 12:09:08
    -0600, in alt.comp.hardware.overclocking, the queezy keyboard of David
    Maynard <> spewed the following:

    |nos1eep wrote:
    |
    |> It is further alleged that on or about Sun, 01 Jan 2006 02:01:53
    |> -0600, in alt.comp.hardware.overclocking, the queezy keyboard of David
    |> Maynard <> spewed the following:
    |>
    |> |nos1eep wrote:
    |> |> It is further alleged that on or about Sat, 31 Dec 2005 16:06:32
    |> |> -0600, in alt.comp.hardware.overclocking, the queezy keyboard of David
    |> |> Maynard <> spewed the following:
    |> |>
    |> |> |joe m wrote:
    |> |> |> hmmm... you mentioned "hit the front power
    |> |> |> button to "blow" out the capaciters"... haven't tried that... but, did
    |> |> |> remove power cable, moved the jumpers to clear cmos plus removed
    |> |> |> battery.
    |> |> |>
    |> |> |> I hope your right about not blowing the mobo... I was also think that
    |> |> |> it may be shorting out against the case.... this heatsink is one of
    |> |> |> those push and pry type heatsinks ... i.e., no level... so, I've had to
    |> |> |> flex the mobo quite a bit during this process... I really hate those
    |> |> |> kind of heat sink designs.
    |> |> |
    |> |> |They usually have a little slot on the end of the spring clip you're
    |> |> |supposed to use an appropriately sized screw driver blade in to push down
    |> |> |and hinge it out.
    |> |>
    |> |> Have you ever had a screwdriver slip, Dave. I have, and now I use a
    |> |> wooden dowel. I hate buying my clients new mobos.
    |> |
    |> |Not when I was using the right screw driver.
    |> |
    |> |How do you get a wooden dowel in the slot?
    |>
    |> The dowel that I use is a 3mm dia stick of extremely flexible hard
    |> wood, has a rather blunt chisel point on it and it fits the slot
    |> nicely, thank you. It's original use was for some kind of hair
    |> contraption for women. I use it because I have postural tremors
    |> assosiated with an affliction and shake like a dog shitting peach
    |> pits. Adaptive tooling.
    |> --
    |>
    |
    |Ah. When you said dowel I envisioned, well, a dowel but that explains it.
    |
    |Sounds like an interesting tool and I might be inclined to try one if I had
    |any idea what it was and how to get it.

    I just did a google and got 11,400,000 hits.
    http://www.manyhorses.com/store_hairsticks.htm
     
    nos1eep, Jan 1, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.