AMD64 X2 processors and Pentium D now IN STOCK at Newegg

Discussion in 'Asus' started by John Lewis, Jun 17, 2005.

  1. John Lewis

    John Lewis Guest

    AMD64 X2 4600+ $859
    AMD64 X2 4400+ $639

    (limit 1 per customer)
    OEM only at the moment. The boxed
    versions are due early July

    ===========================

    Pentium D: 820 $291.99 (limit 5)
    830 $399.99 (limit 5)
    840 $649.99 (limit 2)

    Extreme 840 $1,154.99 (limit 5 )

    All boxed versions.

    Don't forget the beefed up power supply requirements
    for the Intel dual-cores, specifically the +12V.

    John Lewis
     
    John Lewis, Jun 17, 2005
    #1
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  2. John Lewis

    John Lewis Guest

    Motherboards with Via K8T890 need not apply.....

    Power requirements of the fastest part ( the 4800+,
    not yet in stock ) is no greater than that of the 130nm
    A64 4000 ( Rev D or earlier ), or the FX-53.
    ..... oh, I completely forgot the new motherboard. Add
    another $150 to $200 ( plus power supply )

    John Lewis
     
    John Lewis, Jun 17, 2005
    #2
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  3. John Lewis

    milleron Guest

    Also, does anyone know what Asus boards have currently-available BIOS
    versions to support these AMD X2's?

    Ron
     
    milleron, Jun 17, 2005
    #3
  4. John Lewis

    Zeneca Guest

    Yes, this information si available on Asus site.
     
    Zeneca, Jun 17, 2005
    #4
  5. John Lewis

    Smart Feet Guest


    I currently have a FX-55. Any idea how much improvement I would see?

    Thanks...
     
    Smart Feet, Jun 17, 2005
    #5
  6. John Lewis

    John Lewis Guest

    None on gaming - at the moment. Unless the game multithreads and is
    happy to run with a second processor. Very few - trial and error. Once
    dual-cores are well-established, expect to see alternate builds or
    patches for multiprocessors ( a la the 64-bit patch for Far Cry ).
    Pro applications that multithread and can support multi-processors
    obviously will benefit. Video editors, for example...

    Your FX-55 should serve you very well for a long time yet. And since
    the multipliers are unlocked, your overclocking opportunities are
    potentially greater than the A64 series.
    You're welcome.

    John Lewis
     
    John Lewis, Jun 17, 2005
    #6
  7. John Lewis

    dawg Guest

    Do you really think those prices will last long.
    Besides the dual P4 and Dual A64 are different animals. The Dual P4 is two
    cpu's "glued" together. The A64's are much more integrated with memory.
     
    dawg, Jun 17, 2005
    #7
  8. John Lewis

    milleron Guest

    I need your help. I could fine nothing in a search of the Asus Web
    site's "News" about AMD dual-core boards. They mention an Intel-based
    board that's ready but no Athlon models.
    I reviewed all the socket 939 boards and none of the information about
    CPU compatibility mentions any that are X2-ready.
    Where is this information you speak of?

    Ron
     
    milleron, Jun 17, 2005
    #8
  9. John Lewis

    milleron Guest

    I haven't found it on the Asus site, but I did find a Usenet statement
    that X2 support is included in the 1010 BIOS for the A8N-SLI. I
    haven't been able to verify that yet because the lousy Asus Web site
    is so flaky that I can't access the Support pages.
    Ron
     
    milleron, Jun 17, 2005
    #9
  10. John Lewis

    milleron Guest

    Right, I finally found it on the global Asus site. (I made the
    mistake first of checking the US Asus site which is not nearly as
    up-to-date.)
    http://support.asus.com/cpusupport/cpusupport.aspx?SLanguage=en-us

    It turns out that the latest BIOS versions for all members of the A8N
    and A8V families of motherboards have X2 support.
    The new A8N-SLI Premium with the heat-pipe cooling of the southbridge
    is labeled as X2 compatible from it's earliest version. I was lucky
    enough to score one of these at Monarch.com as Newegg doesn't have
    them listed yet.

    Now, if I could figure out what the X2 is good for other than
    benchmarking . . . .
    Ron
     
    milleron, Jun 18, 2005
    #10
  11. John Lewis

    milleron Guest

    Newegg just listed the A8N-SLI Premium in the few hours since my last
    post http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16813131540



    Ron
     
    milleron, Jun 18, 2005
    #11
  12. John Lewis

    Paul Guest

    Paul, Jun 18, 2005
    #12
  13. John Lewis

    milleron Guest

    I'll sure post a subjective "measurement." I don't have the
    instrumentation to give a precise one. Mine will have a large
    Thermalright XP120 right over it with the 120mm heatsink fan blowing
    right on it, so it 'll be actively cooled.
    The rig should be up and running in about 7 days if Newegg and Monarch
    are speedy.

    Ron
     
    milleron, Jun 19, 2005
    #13
  14. John Lewis

    John Lewis Guest

    WARNING: There is a unique Catch 22 in the Premium BIOS
    that was not fixed till BIOS version 1005 ( 2 June 2005 )-- if I
    recall correctly; the Asus Global website is down for
    "synchronization" at the moment

    If you install a X2 with a previous BIOS, you cannot update
    the BIOS.... Only confined to X2, other versions OK !.

    A very nice Catch 22.....unless you have a spare 939 Athlon
    non-X2 still lying around.

    If you only intend to load an X2 and not mess wirh swapping
    processors, then check my facts with the ( Global web-site )
    A8N-SLI Premium BIOS docs BEFORE ordering the board --
    and then check with Newegg. If Newegg don't know the Bios
    version, I would suggest holding off purchase until Newegg
    exhaust the current stock and re-order. You should be safe
    batches that arrive in July.
     
    John Lewis, Jun 19, 2005
    #14
  15. John Lewis

    John Lewis Guest

    If any of you have been following the saga on Tom's Hardware
    for the past 2 weeks:-

    http://www.tomshardware.com/cpu/20050603/index.html

    this soap-opera is nearing its end. Tomorrow should see the final
    report.

    In the 4-synchronous apps setup, the AMD system did very poorly
    on Divx. The testers jumped to the wrong conclusion that HT on
    the Extreme 840 was the reason for the apparent far-superior Intel
    performance. Much to their credit, the test team decided to run the
    apps individually and discovered the real reason -- the Windows
    process scheduler was giving slice-priority to the 840's 4-cores
    (Dual-HT) in the Divx app.

    Running the apps individually, the X2 4800+ is superior to the
    Extreme 840 in all respects.

    Meanwhile here are some other facts from the test:-

    1. The AMD X2 system ( originally set up for SLI ) did not crash
    once during the whole test sequence !!!

    2. The Intel CPU ran at 68 degrees C case (just under the spec
    limit of 69.8 ). The AMD CPU ran at 55 degrees C max.

    3. The Intel system(s) crashed multiple times with multiple board
    replacements - finally stable with a 955 board -- non-SLI
    of course. ( For comparison, the AMD system had to be
    reconfigured to non-SLI.... )

    4. The AMD X2 4800+ is computationally superior to the Intel 840
    in all 4 of the applications chosen. The very odd initial results

    when all 4 apps were running in parallel were due to the
    (automated) Windows process-scheduler allocating an
    inordinately large time-slice to the Intel processor on Divx.

    and here are some known facts from other tests.

    The Extreme 840 takes roughly 80 watts (YES!) more power
    ( all from +12V ) than the AMD X2 when both cores are fully
    loaded. Pretty obvious from the difference in case temps -- the
    fan/heat-sinksare the 'boxed' versions from the respective
    manufacturers. Add to that another 10-20 watts from the
    Northbridge on Intel boards - AMD's memory-controller is
    built-in. Buy a room air-conditioner..........

    Intel dual-core requires a new Socket 775(T) motherboard. It
    will not retrofit into existing 775 motherboards. The X2 will
    generally retrofit into Socket 939 motherboards that have the
    power-capacity to accommodate A64 4000+ or FX-53. Requires
    a BIOS update - check with the manufacturer. The BIOS update
    docs will specify X2 when/if the BIOS is updated for the
    X2 processor. Some X2 exceptions due to careless MB chip-
    design and/or MB design -- Via K8T890 and some Via K8T800
    motherboards will not work with the X2. nForce 4 motherboards
    should all work fine with the X2, provided the power-regulators
    are adequate (and the BIOS is updated ).

    Regardless of marketing hype and Dell's subservience, it
    seems as if the Emperor really has no clothes with regard to
    the first-generation desktop dual-cores. Intel will recover
    once they move off P4 Netburst to dual/multiple-cores based
    on architectures derived on the Pentium M.

    For anybody contemplating a dual-core desktop system in the
    near future and expecting reasonable price/performance/reliability,
    it seems that it would be very wise to avoid Intel -- in spite of the
    deliberately loss-leader price of the Pentium-D 820, which is
    functionally far inferior to the either the AMD X2 4200+ or
    4400+. Also the Pentium-D 820 has some typical Intel internal
    cheese-pairing; no power-management - hence probably very
    limited overclockability with air-cooling-- and it does not run
    properly ( for reasons not yet explained by either Intel or nVidia )
    on Intel nForce4-SLI boards -- it only runs if one core is
    disabled in BIOS..
     
    John Lewis, Jun 21, 2005
    #15
  16. John Lewis

    Ed Guest

    Boy for a hardware site they sure screwed up on getting the Intel
    working properly which was funny since they seem so pro Intel at that
    site you'd think it would be a piece of cake.

    Monday June 20th
    * Data compression with WinRAR: the AMD system has 29.5% better
    performance;

    * MP3 encoding of the CD: AMD system has 4.7% better performance;

    * DivX encoding of the DVD: AMD system has 28.2% better performance.

    The 3D game Farcry, which represents the fourth application, will remain
    active until around 9:00 A.M. PST Tuesday.

    Ed
     
    Ed, Jun 21, 2005
    #16
  17. John Lewis

    John Lewis Guest

    No professional Evaluation/QC engineers there
    .....a bunch of hacks...
    Yes, indeed. However, egg all over face and dripping down
    chin having to retract earlier statements claiming that the
    earlier Divx test results proved that Intel's video-processing
    is superior to AMDs.

    It was very obvious that they should have benchmarked all
    the apps individually on the systems before trying the
    multi-apps combo. Anybody with an ounce of knowledge
    of parallel-processing in a server environment could have
    told them that.

    THG is supposed to give a summary review of the 18-days
    some time tomorrow. See how they can lick Intel's boots -
    probably claim cheaper system-costs due to the differential
    in CPU prices---- forgetting the new 775 (T) Motherboard
    and DDR2 memory.....and the water-cooling required to
    keep the system functioning with long-term reliability.
    Regardless of reliability, inadequate ventilation in conjunction
    with heavy duty apps will cause the Extreme 840 to sense
    overtemp and to throttle back without any warning to
    the user.

    Intel ==== Emperor Rube Goldberg
    at least with the current generation of Netburst dual-cores.

    BTW, X2 4400+ and 4600+ (OEM, no heat-sink/fan)
    were in stock at Newegg a couple of days ago. Probably
    ran out fast.....The boxed versions are due early July.
    Boxed Pentium-D and Extreme 840 were also available.
     
    John Lewis, Jun 22, 2005
    #17
  18. John Lewis

    milleron Guest

    OK, I have it working while sitting on its antistatic bag on my
    benchtop. All that's hooked up is the XP120 HSF, a fanless,
    heat-pipe-cooled Gigabyte Radeon X800XL, the gig of Corsair 2-2-2-5
    RAM, and a floppy drive. The following observations are with the
    motherboard sitting in the BIOS setup program -- i.e., no load at all
    on the CPU or southbridge.
    I couldn't believe it, but I had to touch the southbridge for several
    seconds to be sure that it was warmer than room temperature. It is,
    but just barely. The heatpipe between the southbridge is literally
    cool to the touch, and the heatsink, located way over behind the CPU
    socket, is cool to the touch. The heatsinks on the video card are
    cool to the touch. The 120mm fan on the XP120 is essentially
    noiseless at 1900 RPM. The heatpipes and fins of the XP120 are cool
    to the touch. BIOS hardware monitor reports the CPU to be 23°C under
    these conditions

    I'll report further when I get the rig mounted in it's case with all
    the drives hooked up and the CPU under load.


    Ron
     
    milleron, Jun 23, 2005
    #18
  19. John Lewis

    Paul Guest

    OK, I have it working while sitting on its antistatic bag on my
    benchtop. All that's hooked up is the XP120 HSF, a fanless,
    heat-pipe-cooled Gigabyte Radeon X800XL, the gig of Corsair 2-2-2-5
    RAM, and a floppy drive. The following observations are with the
    motherboard sitting in the BIOS setup program -- i.e., no load at all
    on the CPU or southbridge.
    I couldn't believe it, but I had to touch the southbridge for several
    seconds to be sure that it was warmer than room temperature. It is,
    but just barely. The heatpipe between the southbridge is literally
    cool to the touch, and the heatsink, located way over behind the CPU
    socket, is cool to the touch. The heatsinks on the video card are
    cool to the touch. The 120mm fan on the XP120 is essentially
    noiseless at 1900 RPM. The heatpipes and fins of the XP120 are cool
    to the touch. BIOS hardware monitor reports the CPU to be 23°C under
    these conditions

    I'll report further when I get the rig mounted in it's case with all
    the drives hooked up and the CPU under load.


    Ron[/QUOTE]

    I'm impressed. I figured that contraption would be a disaster.
    Guess I was wrong.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 28, 2005
    #19
  20. John Lewis

    milleron Guest

    I'm presuming that the metal heatpipe connector atop the chipset is
    approximately the same temperature as the chipset. If it is, then,
    yes, it works very well.

    There is word on the Asus forums, however, that it works only in the
    horizontal and traditional vertical positions. There are some Lian Li
    cases that mount the motherboard against the opposite wall of the
    case, thus turning the mobo upside down. In spite of the fact that
    the heatpipe still runs mainly horizontally in this configuration, one
    person there has reported that the chipset "overheats rapidly" in the
    Lian Li V2100 case. For some reason, I'm skeptical about that report,
    but I thought it best to pass it along for what it's worth.

    Traditional positioning of the heatpipe:

    Heatsink
    |_________
    \
    chipset


    Position in V2100:

    chipset
    \_________
    |
    Heatsink


    Ron
     
    milleron, Jun 29, 2005
    #20
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