ASUS A7V8X-X ...MAXIMUM HARD DRIVE SIZE?

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Paul in NC, Oct 30, 2003.

  1. Paul in NC

    Paul in NC Guest

    Hello NG! Just a quick question concerning hard drive options.

    Here's the info on my mainboard:
    ASUS A7V8X-X, BIOS Revision 1006 - System BIOS Date 08/06/03

    My question is: What is the absolute largest size EIDE hard drive supported
    by this motherboard/BIOS?

    I would love to be able to drop one of those Maxtor 320GB (4A320J8, 5400RPM,
    2MB cache buffer, UATA/133) drives in my box.

    Thanks in advance for all assistance sent my way!

    Paul
     
    Paul in NC, Oct 30, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Paul in NC

    Paul Guest

    http://www.asus.com.tw/support/english/techref/48bithdd/index.aspx

    "Note: Model manufactured after 1st January, 2003 will all support
    48bit HDD (137 GB HDD)." So there is no hardware limit, except all
    the issues with getting the OS to format, partition, and recognize
    the drive... Search in Google for "EnableBigLBA" for more details.
    You will be swearing a blue streak before you are finished, due to
    the extended periods required to test the setup. I recommend copying
    more than 137GB of files to the drive as a test, as otherwise you
    can be fooled into thinking everything is OK. What size backup
    device will you be using ?

    Paul
     
    Paul, Oct 30, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Paul in NC

    Paul in NC Guest


    I would love to be able to drop one of those Maxtor 320GB (4A320J8, 5400RPM,
    2MB cache buffer, UATA/133) drives in my box.
    But more realistically, Probably a 160GB to 200GB unit. It does not have to
    have an enormous cache buffer, nor does it have to be a fast spinner, just
    be EIDE and BIG.
    What do you think? Would a 160-200GB model work? As it is, I cannot do a
    test copy of files greater than 137GB because I don't own the hard drive as
    of yet!
    Paul
     
    Paul in NC, Oct 31, 2003
    #3
  4. Paul in NC

    Paul Guest

    What my answer was meant to convey, is most of your problems will be
    software ones and not hardware. Buying the drive is the easy part -
    getting it to work properly is the hard part. If the drive is 138GB
    or is 320GB, you have to do the same amount of work and get past the
    same software barriers.

    Some people who try to use the large drives, end up using a third
    party utility, like Partition Magic or the like, to get the disk
    set up. Some people never got the large disk to work properly
    with their OS and system. But as far as I know, it wasn't a hardware
    problem.

    For me, I'd rather buy a 120GB drive and just plug it in and use it.
    At least until more people post their success stories, and how easy
    it was to get working properly. That is why, when you think you've
    done everything correctly, I recommend transferring enough files
    to the drive, so that the 137GB boundary is crossed while writing
    files. Otherwise, you'll only find out you didn't set up the drive
    properly months from now, when it is full of real files.

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Oct 31, 2003
    #4
  5. Paul in NC

    Paul H Guest

    surely if he has the bios support, and can format from XP SP1, there are no
    s/w hurdles to overcome.....
    I added a 160Gb drive to my existing XP SP1 setup and have had no tweaks or
    adjustments to perform.
     
    Paul H, Oct 31, 2003
    #5
  6. Paul in NC

    Paul in NC Guest

    Paul H,
    As far as BIOS support:
    ASUS A7V8X-X, BIOS Revision 1006 - System BIOS Date 08/06/03
    To which the first Paul who offered assistance by quoting (among other
    things) ASUS website on the matter "Note: Model manufactured after 1st
    January, 2003 will all support 48bit HDD (137 GB HDD)."
    As far as Software support, I am running XP HOME SP1

    Maybe I should stick to 120GB?
    Ty,
    Paul_in_NC
     
    Paul in NC, Oct 31, 2003
    #6
  7. Paul in NC

    Paul Guest

    I recommend you copy more than 128GB of files to it as a test. I've read
    of people who suffered corruption when they hit 128GB, just as the binary
    address send to the drive passes the magic number, the device driver
    dies because it cannot write any more. This can corrupt the disk. So,
    before filling the disk with real files, back it up and test it. You'll
    get no symptoms until you hit or pass the magic 128GB (binary) number.
    Just duplicating a file over and over again would do it.

    Didn't you have to add the registry entry "EnableBigLBA" ?

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Nov 7, 2003
    #7
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.