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Atmel AVR Road Map

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by Mike Warren, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. Mike Warren

    Mike Warren Guest

    Does anyone know if Atmel has a product lifetime road map for their
    AVR devices?

    I can't seem to find one on their web site.

    I just noticed that the ATTiny26 is "not recommended for new designs"
    and would like to know how long they are expected to be produced for.
     
    Mike Warren, Feb 26, 2008
    #1
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  2. Mike Warren

    linnix Guest

    When you see that sign, they are not produced anymore. Distributors
    can't order anymore of them. There seems to be plenty of Attiny26-8SU
    around (200,000), but less of other packages. If your product really
    needs that chip, you should buy up life-time worth of inventory.
     
    linnix, Feb 26, 2008
    #2
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  3. Mike Warren

    Mike Warren Guest

    Thanks for the reply. I was hoping there might be a published road
    map for all their chips.
    I use 16SI but should already have enough for my needs. Just need to
    find something else suitable for the next product. Won't be a problem
    as they have lots to choose from. :)
     
    Mike Warren, Feb 26, 2008
    #3
  4. Being once a fan of AVR, I quit using the processors from Atmel.
    Reason: they keep changing and dropping the product lines at all time.
    Atmel does not provide for the 100% compatible replacements, which means
    that the whole lot of work has to be redone, the procedures have to be
    changed and everything has to be tested again. This is not acceptable
    for the embedded applications in my field.


    Vladimir Vassilevsky
    DSP and Mixed Signal Design Consultant
    http://www.abvolt.com
     
    Vladimir Vassilevsky, Feb 26, 2008
    #4
  5. Mike Warren

    linnix Guest

    I did see something like that a few years ago, but everything is
    subject to change.
    SI is leaded. You might have to go unleaded (SU) sometimes in the
    future.
    I believe the Tiny25/45/85 is their main path of migrations; so, it
    would be safe to design around them.
     
    linnix, Feb 26, 2008
    #5
  6. The Tiny261 seems to be the successor of the Tiny26.


    Mit freundlichen Grüßen

    Frank-Christian Krügel
     
    Frank-Christian Kruegel, Feb 26, 2008
    #6
  7. Does anyone know if Atmel has a product lifetime road map for their
    Not really true. You are confusing "not recommended" with Last Time Buy.
    "not recommended" means simply that.
    The company reselling the product, thinks that you are better off by
    designing in another component. In this case, the ATtiny261

    Sometimes this means that it is planned to be obsolete, and sometimes
    there are other reasons.
    I know of one part which was in production for 15 years after beeing
    stamped with "not recommened for new designs".

    Searching for "Debugwire", in the ATtiny26 datasheet, might
    give you a hint, why it is better to use the ATtiny261.
     
    Ulf Samuelsson, Feb 26, 2008
    #7
  8. Mike Warren

    Mike Warren Guest

    So I guess Atmel don't publish a road map?
    But no doubt more expensive. I'll look it up.
     
    Mike Warren, Feb 27, 2008
    #8
  9. Not always. There is also such a thing as a 'go away' price
    on older parts !!

    We've just helped someone with a Freescale 'not for new design'
    device.

    The original part IS still available (but fading), but price is now over
    3x that of the equivalent newer replacement part.
    (but they do have to move to SMD, which they were doing anyway..)

    -jg
     
    Jim Granville, Feb 27, 2008
    #9

  10. Decisions on LTB can be made for various reasons.
    I think a normal behaviour for semiconductor companies
    is to mark a part as "not recommended" for new designs,
    and then inform the sales force about the roadmap for
    obsolecense.

    The LTB itself is is a formal process starting with the announcement
    of LTB, giving certain time for the customer to order parts.
    This is mostly, but not always followed in my experience.

    By making sure you get these announcements, you also ensure
    you will be updated with the roadmap.
    Not an Atmel part.



    --
    Best Regards,
    Ulf Samuelsson
    This is intended to be my personal opinion which may,
    or may not be shared by my employer Atmel Nordic AB
    "Mike Warren" <> skrev i meddelandet
    news:...
     
    Ulf Samuelsson, Feb 28, 2008
    #10
  11. Mike Warren

    John B Guest

    John B, Mar 1, 2008
    #11
  12. Mike Warren

    Mike Warren Guest

    I suspect he meant the part he was talking about was not an Atmel
    part. I doubt he was simply being pedantic about my faulty memory of
    the part number AT90S1200.
     
    Mike Warren, Mar 1, 2008
    #12
  13. AT-S1200?
     
    Ulf Samuelsson, Mar 3, 2008
    #13
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