Backup Server

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Guest, Dec 5, 2013.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    My HP MediaSmart server seems to be dead.

    Nobody seems to make a Windows Home Server box
    anymore.

    Would the PowerEdge T20 be a good box to put
    Windows Home Server on? It is not listed as
    a supported OS.

    Alternatively, is there a NAS solution that anyone
    would recommend? Ideally it would be one that one
    could format the individual disks with NTFS so one
    could pull out the disks and put them into an external
    enclosure to read on any PC.

    Thanks in advance,
     
    Guest, Dec 5, 2013
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Ben Myers Guest

    Why Windows Home Server? Didn't Microsoft stop supporting it? Why not FreeNas or NAS4Free, freely downloadable with ongoing development and bug fixes? ... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Dec 7, 2013
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Ben> Why Windows Home Server? Didn't Microsoft stop supporting it?
    Ben> Why not FreeNas or NAS4Free, freely downloadable with ongoing
    Ben> development and bug fixes? ... Ben Myers

    I had not realized that MS had stopped the WHS line. I have used
    my old HP for years with a lot of luck. I decided to go for the
    MS Server 2012 Essentials, as that will be a lot lower learning
    curve for me. I just ordered the box today. T320.

    Thanks.

    ah
     
    Guest, Dec 8, 2013
    #3
  4. Guest

    Ben Myers Guest

    The T320 chassis looks like it was inspired by one of the nicer CoolerMaster cases. Not a bad package price.

    Although I have not used any of the free Linux NAS offerings, I have set upthe more mainstream Linux distributions as file and print servers. Not too hard at all, and I do not claim to be a Linux heavyweight. All menu driven and no command line knowledge needed. My guess is that one of the free Linux NAS distros might be even easier, because they cut directly to the chase, or server installation, rather than having the installer go through basic Linux setup first. I regularly use a number of purpose-specific live Linux distros, and they are very direct, simple and easy to use.

    What I continue to find off-putting about Linux is the insistence of the Linux crowd to use their own peculiar vocabulary, like distro instead of distribution, and lots of cutesy program names (e.g. GIMP, which is excellent) which obscure the intent of what a program is supposed to do, and an almostoverwhelming number of Linux distributions, all done by people with large egos and possibly little common sense in spending their time. Oh, yeah, and at least five regularly used user interface packages that sit on top of all the command line stuff, all looking a little different. Too darn bad, because this scares away a lot of people. So someone says "Use Linux", and the response has to be "Which one?" Too darn bad, because this scares awaya lot of people from highly functional useful software... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Dec 8, 2013
    #4
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Ben> The T320 chassis looks like it was inspired by one of the nicer
    Ben> CoolerMaster cases. Not a bad package price.

    It is a lot more than my old HP MediaSmart box, but it should do a lot
    more too. Currently I am planning to use several Raid 1 volumes, so
    I could just pull out any disk and plug it into another machine.

    Ben> Although I have not used any of the free Linux NAS offerings, I
    Ben> have set up the more mainstream Linux distributions as file and
    Ben> print servers. Not too hard at all, and I do not claim to be a
    Ben> Linux heavyweight. All menu driven and no command line
    Ben> knowledge needed. My guess is that one of the free Linux NAS
    Ben> distros might be even easier, because they cut directly to the
    Ben> chase, or server installation, rather than having the installer
    Ben> go through basic Linux setup first. I regularly use a number
    Ben> of purpose-specific live Linux distros, and they are very
    Ben> direct, simple and easy to use.

    Ben> What I continue to find off-putting about Linux is the
    Ben> insistence of the Linux crowd to use their own peculiar
    Ben> vocabulary, like distro instead of distribution, and lots of
    Ben> cutesy program names (e.g. GIMP, which is excellent) which
    Ben> obscure the intent of what a program is supposed to do, and an
    Ben> almost overwhelming number of Linux distributions, all done by
    Ben> people with large egos and possibly little common sense in
    Ben> spending their time. Oh, yeah, and at least five regularly
    Ben> used user interface packages that sit on top of all the command
    Ben> line stuff, all looking a little different. Too darn bad,
    Ben> because this scares away a lot of people. So someone says "Use
    Ben> Linux", and the response has to be "Which one?" Too darn bad,
    Ben> because this scares away a lot of people from highly functional
    Ben> useful software... Ben Myers

    I used various flavors of Unix for many years when I was working, but
    never as an administrator. Now that I am retired I have played around
    with a few flavors, once as a boot off an external drive and more lately
    as a virtual machine. I do not feel confident enough to have it as my
    main backup platform.

    I am planning to buy at least one NAS enclosure to do periodic full data
    backups, and keep usually offside or in a fireproof safe. I figure if
    my burns down I will need to replace the computers, so I will probably
    not bother with system backups for that.

    Do you have any NAS recommendations? I probably want 4 bays with a solid
    raid 5 implementation. The "WD My Cloud" sounds pretty good, but it
    seems to be pretty new so there is not a long track record for
    reliability. I would probably get it diskless and populate it myself.
    (Being anal, I would probably order the disks from different vendors to
    lower the probability of getting several from a bad lot --- is that too
    anal?)

    Also, are you in MA? If so, do you take on new clients? If I ever got
    stuck, you seem like a good person to hire to get real traction. If so,
    please email me with the obvious deletion to my header email address. I
    live inside 128.

    Thanks,
     
    Guest, Dec 9, 2013
    #5
  6. Guest

    Greg Swift Guest

    Andrew:

    This is probably too late to help if you have already decided to go
    another route, but I don't think it is technically accurate to say MS
    is no longer *supporting* WHS.

    MS has said there will be no further development of WHS beyond the
    latest version, WHS 2011, but as WHS 2011 is based on Server 2008,
    they are still putting out security updates and such via Windows
    Update, and will presumably continue to do so as long as Server 2008
    is supported. And, you can still obtain an OEM copy of WHS 2011 at
    Newegg for just $50.

    About a year ago, I replaced my HP Mediasmart Server (with the
    original version of WHS) with an HP Proliant MicroServer on which I
    installed WHS 2011 and it has been rock solid. The box I bought is no
    longer available, but the N54L that replaced it (also available on
    Newegg, HP, and elsewhere) is about the same.

    Again, this may be too late to help you, but thought I should pass it
    along.
     
    Greg Swift, Dec 11, 2013
    #6
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Greg> Andrew: This is probably too late to help if you have already
    Greg> decided to go another route, but I don't think it is
    Greg> technically accurate to say MS is no longer *supporting* WHS.

    Greg> MS has said there will be no further development of WHS beyond
    Greg> the latest version, WHS 2011, but as WHS 2011 is based on
    Greg> Server 2008, they are still putting out security updates and
    Greg> such via Windows Update, and will presumably continue to do so
    Greg> as long as Server 2008 is supported. And, you can still
    Greg> obtain an OEM copy of WHS 2011 at Newegg for just $50.

    Greg> About a year ago, I replaced my HP Mediasmart Server (with the
    Greg> original version of WHS) with an HP Proliant MicroServer on
    Greg> which I installed WHS 2011 and it has been rock solid. The
    Greg> box I bought is no longer available, but the N54L that
    Greg> replaced it (also available on Newegg, HP, and elsewhere) is
    Greg> about the same.

    Greg> Again, this may be too late to help you, but thought I should
    Greg> pass it along.

    Thanks Greg,
    I did consider going that route, but decided to have a more extensible
    system, and an OS that will have ongoing development. It is obviously
    more expensive, but I do not think I will outgrow the box in its
    lifetime.

    Ben> Why Windows Home Server? Didn't Microsoft stop supporting it?
    Ben> Why not FreeNas or NAS4Free, freely downloadable with ongoing
    Ben> development and bug fixes? ... Ben MyersGreg> --

    Greg> Greg Swift <gjsaux at pobox dot com>
     
    Guest, Dec 11, 2013
    #7
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Ben> The T320 chassis looks like it was inspired by one of the nicer
    Ben> CoolerMaster cases. Not a bad package price.

    Ben> Although I have not used any of the free Linux NAS offerings, I
    Ben> have set up the more mainstream Linux distributions as file and
    Ben> print servers. Not too hard at all, and I do not claim to be a
    Ben> Linux heavyweight. All menu driven and no command line
    Ben> knowledge needed. My guess is that one of the free Linux NAS
    Ben> distros might be even easier, because they cut directly to the
    Ben> chase, or server installation, rather than having the installer
    Ben> go through basic Linux setup first. I regularly use a number
    Ben> of purpose-specific live Linux distros, and they are very
    Ben> direct, simple and easy to use.

    You might well have been right. I am getting there, but the Win Server
    2012 Essentials learning curve was large. I expect a free Linux server
    learning curve would not have been bigger. I was quite surprised at how
    big the curve was. One good thing, it alerted me to a somewhat corrupt
    Win 7 installation on my son's college PC, on which I am doing a repair
    install (upgrade in place) as I type. Hopefully that will fix it.
    Naturally he does not have all the software disks to do a full clean
    install.
     
    Guest, Dec 29, 2013
    #8
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