BIOS password does NOT protect the system!

Discussion in 'Dell' started by JMI, Mar 18, 2009.

  1. JMI

    JMI Guest

    Ok, I had a VERY unusual problem today. I set the BIOS password on a
    Dell Optiplex desktop and rebooted to make sure that it worked. I
    entered a few bogus password tries, got to my 3rd attempt, it said
    that the password was incorrect, but upon pressing another key, it
    allowed me to bypass the password anyways and the system continued to
    boot up to Windows!

    I've never seen anything like this before, a password that is so
    easily cracked as this one was. I entered jibberish each time I tried
    and it allowed me to get past the password and boot up!

    Has anyone out there seen this issue before with a Dell Optiplex or
    any other system?

    Perplexed,

    Jeff
     
    JMI, Mar 18, 2009
    #1
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  2. JMI

    S.Lewis Guest


    What model Optiplex?

    No, I've not seen that before and would've dismissed it as bad sequencing
    saving the password until your comments about it accepting junk/gibberish.
     
    S.Lewis, Mar 18, 2009
    #2
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  3. JMI

    woody Guest

    You have to set the system password, not the BIOS password to prevent the
    system from booting.

    Woody
     
    woody, Mar 18, 2009
    #3
  4. JMI

    S.Lewis Guest


    Good point.

    Hope he can remember the former to set the latter. g
     
    S.Lewis, Mar 18, 2009
    #4
  5. Hi!
    I would love to know exactly which OptiPlex model exhibited this
    behavior. When my OptiPlex GX400 (A05) is not busy, I think I'll try
    it just for grins and giggles to see what happens.

    My first thought would be to make sure the CMOS is not corrupt (reset
    to factory defaults or pull the battery) as that can cause
    inappropriate behavior. Then I'd check to be sure the BIOS is at the
    latest release, in case this was the result of "a stupid mistake" that
    was later fixed. It would also be worthwhile to consider replacing the
    CMOS battery if the machine is more than four years old.

    William
     
    William R. Walsh, Mar 18, 2009
    #5
  6. JMI

    Jeff Ingram Guest

    This is the system password, btw. And like I had said, it was
    blocking me from booting until the 3rd attempt at the password. Type
    jibberish again and tada, I'm booting up into Windows.
     
    Jeff Ingram, Mar 18, 2009
    #6
  7. JMI

    S.Lewis Guest

    This is the system password, btw. And like I had said, it was
    blocking me from booting until the 3rd attempt at the password. Type
    jibberish again and tada, I'm booting up into Windows.


    I got nuthin, man - unless it's some sort of known BIOS issue with that
    model that a flash might correct.
     
    S.Lewis, Mar 18, 2009
    #7
  8. JMI

    S.Lewis Guest


    PS: if the system is 3+ years old, you might try changing the CMOS battery
    as a shot in the dark.
     
    S.Lewis, Mar 18, 2009
    #8
  9. JMI

    Fixer Guest

    In desktop machines you can clear the password by resetting nthe jumper,
    maybe just maybe the jumper has been reset at some point ans left open???

    However one thing that does happen if you have a TAG number set in the BIOS,
    certainly on the newer laptops anyway, if you flash the BIOS it clears the
    TAG number , I did inform Dell of this but they didn't seem to bothered
    about it
     
    Fixer, Mar 19, 2009
    #9
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