Can a mac be affected by spyware?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Kathy, Jul 2, 2004.

  1. Kathy

    Kathy Guest

    Thank you to all who have answered my questions. It has helped a lot.
     
    Kathy, Jul 3, 2004
    #21
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  2. Kathy

    stan Guest

    My best advise is to simply delete the unwanted mail. You could use a spam
    filter, but you run the strong risk of having the spam filter delete
    messages that you do prefer to receive.

    Anyone who told you that those spams were from Spyware does not know
    what they are talking about. Do not take advise on computers from that
    person again.
     
    stan, Jul 3, 2004
    #22
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  3. this is a virus - on someone else's computer, who also has your email
    address in their address book
     
    Fetch, Rover, Fetch, Jul 3, 2004
    #23
  4. This was happening to me, with my fastmail.fm address getting massive
    amounts of SWEN. I rapidly exceeded my mail quota until I set up a
    filter to exclude anything bigger than 100K. Now everyone's happy again
    (but as far as I know this worm is still propagating, so I'll probably
    need the filter forever).

    Dan
     
    Daniel E. Sabath, Jul 3, 2004
    #24
  5. Kathy

    Tim Murray Guest

    But what set it off?
     
    Tim Murray, Jul 4, 2004
    #25
  6. Kathy

    Davoud Guest

    clw:
    Tim Murray:
    Indeed! That's the question that I meant to ask, but I became
    distracted by my life outside USENET. I'll try not to let that happen
    again. I want to know what set off clw's spyware detector, because the
    answer to the question "Can a Mac be affected by spyware," within the
    OP's likely meaning, is a simple "No." The longer answer is "No,
    because no one has written any spyware applications for the Mac. If
    someone were to write one and find a way of propogating it on Macs,
    then Macs could be affected by spyware."

    Davoud
     
    Davoud, Jul 4, 2004
    #26
  7. Kathy

    clw Guest

    Tim Murray:
    Indeed! That's the question that I meant to ask, but I became
    distracted by my life outside USENET. I'll try not to let that happen
    again. I want to know what set off clw's spyware detector, because the
    answer to the question "Can a Mac be affected by spyware," within the
    OP's likely meaning, is a simple "No." The longer answer is "No,
    because no one has written any spyware applications for the Mac. If
    someone were to write one and find a way of propogating it on Macs,
    then Macs could be affected by spyware."[/QUOTE]

    I have several tutorials that establish a connection to the "teacher"
    site after I have opened their web page. Little Snitch always pops up
    and asks me if I want to allow the connection, and gives options for how
    many times.

    I have also has several episodes of Little Snitch intercepting a dial
    out when on a web site that I did not know would do such.

    I guess it is set off by my computer trying to dial out via a route that
    I have not selected to always be open.

    And, I must confess that I now recall that Internet Cleanup 2.0 will
    also do the same thing. But, I shut down that action because it was
    interrupting a lot of dial out activity that I use a lot (like
    downloading upgrades etc) and I did not know how to set it to not
    interrupt those call outs.

    Your computer "calls out" a lot, but you just do not know it. Every
    time you click to down load something or choose some links it happens.
     
    clw, Jul 4, 2004
    #27
  8. Kathy

    Chris Moore Guest

    I never see anything totally unexpected if that's what your wondering
    (some program you've didn't know you had trying to connect). Adobe
    Acrobat Professional tries (probably a version check), a web page may
    try something unexpected. Safari has freedom to connect to port 80 all
    the time, a web page the other day wanted to connect to port 8000 which
    I promptly denied. Probably was a spyware attempt for PC's, I doubt my
    Mac would have understood whatever instuctions it found on that port
    though if I allowed it to connect.
     
    Chris Moore, Jul 4, 2004
    #28
  9. If Snitch doesn't list the "spyware" app, then try to see what processes
    are involved. But it's always going to be an app that the user installed,
    since there's little chance that the user would allow apps to install
    themselves without a password entry.
     
    George Williams, Jul 4, 2004
    #29
  10. Kathy

    Davoud Guest

    clw:
    Actually, I think that I have been aware for some years that when a web
    page or e-mail message or Usenet post appears on my display it's
    because I instructed my software to "call out" and ask for it. I have
    never thought that clicking that button caused some sort of magic waves
    to emanate from my brain to a remote server ;>).

    In any case, the bottom line is that the question "Is there spyware for
    the Mac?" has been asked repeatedly in numerous forums, and no one has
    been able to name a piece of it. "...Purple Twilight" did name Real
    Player, but did not say what it reports and to whom it reports, so I
    discounted his allegation.

    It's a question of definition. If I click a link on a web page and
    receive another page in response, and the remote server makes a note
    that it sent that page to my IP address (as many do) I don't regard
    that as spying.

    Davoud
     
    Davoud, Jul 5, 2004
    #30
  11. Kathy

    Chris Moore Guest

    I wasn't aware of that. Actually I feel like I had a slight victory
    here that I didn't have to endure some idiots idea of ambiant music.
     
    Chris Moore, Jul 5, 2004
    #31
  12. Kathy

    Greg Robbins Guest

    There is no spyware in RealPlayer. It's a regular, drag-install, Mac
    OS X-native application.

    Greg Robbins
     
    Greg Robbins, Jul 5, 2004
    #32
  13. *software installed without permission

    *software installed with permission claiming to do one thing but -
    either does not do that thing, or does other undisclosed actions -
    primarily returning information on key strokes or web sites visited.

    *software that returns to party(ies) unknown information regarding the
    users surfing habits, specifically with the intent of delivering
    "targeted content" - ads.

    *software that log the users keystrokes including (but not limited to)
    passwords, credit card numbers and other personal information with the
    intent to send this information to other - unauthorize persons

    *software designed to hijack, or change personal computer setting such
    as home pages.

    *software designed to interfere with the normal operation of the
    computer. Specifically internet surfing, and the redirecting of the
    browser to sites the user did not specify.

    *software designed to open a web browser (or other application) without
    the user's permission - with the specific intent to display ads or
    transmit information about the user.

    anyone else?
     
    Fetch, Rover, Fetch, Jul 6, 2004
    #33
  14. Kathy

    jpmcwilliams Guest

    Thanks for the detailed summation. It makes me triply glad I use Macs.

    --

    John McWilliams

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm
    not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
     
    jpmcwilliams, Jul 7, 2004
    #34
  15. If you're really interested, try subscribing to alt.privacy.spyware.
    There's not much discussion of Mac-specific stuff there, since there
    isn't anything Mac-specific to worry about, but even Macs are
    vulnerable to things like tracking cookies, java scripts and applets,
    etc.

    You might also take a look at the group's FAQ at
    http://shplink.com/misc/FAQ.htm.

    =IML=

    Remove the "removethis" to reply

    ** Help stop Internet SPAM! Join the **
    ** Coalition Against Unsolicited Commercial E-mail **
    ** (CAUCE). Visit http://www.cauce.org **
     
    Ira Lieberman, Jul 7, 2004
    #35
  16. Kathy

    Paul Fuchs Guest

    Buying life insurance when you are dead would be very cost effective.
     
    Paul Fuchs, Jul 9, 2004
    #36
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