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Can an SS5 use SCA2 harddrives? non-Sun harddrives?

Discussion in 'Sun Hardware' started by Ghazan Haider, Sep 5, 2003.

  1. I can buy a whole bunch of harddisks at low cost for my 5 SS5s, all of
    which come from Sun systems. I know the Ultra5 can take any size of
    IDE or SCSI drives (with an adapter), with an updated prom, but what
    about the SS5? Can you throw in another drive from some other sun
    system into it given the connector is the same?

    Secondly, has anyone successfully used drives with the SCA2 connector
    in SS5s? I'm not sure whats the difference with the connectors aside
    from speed or if they're compatible at all.
     
    Ghazan Haider, Sep 5, 2003
    #1
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  2. The SCA2 is basically a connector. SCSI disks can have SC2
    connectors. Fibre channel disks can have SC2 connectors.

    Where I'm getting at is in order to judge compatibility, look at the
    make and model of the disk and the controller you have. If the drive
    is compatible, but the connector is wrong, then there are many vendors
    who will sell you an external converter that plugs into the disk which
    will convert it to anything you need for $15 or so ( assuming the disk
    isn't a fibre channel device).

    David
     
    David A.Lethe, Sep 5, 2003
    #2
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  3. The SCA2 is basically a connector. SCSI disks can have SC2
    Assuming the disk and controller are both SCSI (Ultra Wide/Fast) with
    the only difference being one having the SCA1 connector, the other
    SCA2 connector, would they work?

    I guess my question is, are the SCA1/2 connectors like ATA33 to
    ATA100, which are intercompatible with some performance loss on
    downgrading, or are they like 50-pin SCSI or 68-pin SCSI which does
    require an adapter with no performance loss if say both the controller
    and disk are Ultra SCSI?
     
    Ghazan Haider, Sep 5, 2003
    #3
  4. AFAIK the only difference between SCA and SCA2 is that some pins, e.g.
    ground, in the SCA2 connector was moved to make sure they make contact
    first when the disk is hot swapped. I don't think anyone makes SCA any
    more, they all use SCA2 connectors. I have never bothered about the
    difference, I just plug in the disk and it works.
     
    Goran Larsson, Sep 5, 2003
    #4
  5. As far as I'm aware there is no limit, although the disks must be 1"
    and not 1.6" high. I've used 36 Gb disks in an SS20, but I've never
    head of anyone having any problems with disk size on any machine like
    you have.

    Just make sure your root partition is under 2 Gb, otherwise it may not
    boot.
    --
    Dr. David Kirkby,
    Senior Research Fellow,
    Department of Medical Physics,
    University College London,
    11-20 Capper St, London, WC1E 6JA.
    Website: http://www.medphys.ucl.ac.uk/~davek
    Author of 'atlc' http://atlc.sourceforge.net/
     
    Dr. David Kirkby, Sep 8, 2003
    #5
  6. As far as I'm aware there is no limit, although the disks must be 1"
    Oh I dont (yet) have issues with disk sizes, just wondering if I
    should invest in the cheap online SCA2-connector drives. I'm
    reasonably sure Solaris 9 could use up to 18GB at least (on the SS5)
    and I plan to get the 9GB drives. Only I'm not sure if the difference
    between SCA1 and SCA2 is like ATA-33 and ATA-100 (interoperable) or
    like SCSI-50-pin and SCSI-68-pin (needing an adapter) or like SCSI and
    ATA (incompatible). I'll get a low-power 9-GB 1" drive with the root
    partition being 512MB to be able to boot with no issues, hopefully
    it'll work in an SCA1 capable machine.
     
    Ghazan Haider, Sep 8, 2003
    #6
  7. I don't think that is true about the Ultra 5 and IDE disks. I've read in
    a couple of places there is a limit of around 137 Gb - can't recall the
    exact number. We put some 120 Gb disks in U5's at work, but I've never
    tried any larger.
    Any SCA disk that is not high-voltage differential (HVD) and is 1" high
    will work. HVD disks have the potential to destroy the disk and the SS5.
    Just make sure the disk is not HVD (modern LVD disks are fine).

    --
    The day Microsoft makes something that doesn't suck is probably the day
    they start making vacuum cleaners." -Ernst Jan Plugge.

    Dr. David Kirkby,
    Senior Research Fellow,
    Department of Medical Physics,
    University College London,
    11-20 Capper St, London, WC1E 6JA.
    Website: http://www.medphys.ucl.ac.uk/~davek
    Author of 'atlc' http://atlc.sourceforge.net/
     
    Dr. David Kirkby, Sep 11, 2003
    #7
  8. I agree. U5/10s can use IDE drives upto 137 GB, meaning 120 GB drives,
    provided Solaris 8 10/01 or whatever the FAQ says.

    Also, anyone using a => 146 GB U320 SCSI drive with an SCSI/IDE adapter
    in a U5/10 must have way too much money, as that drive is likely worth
    more than the entire U5/10. If you can afford SCSI drives, you should
    get a proper HBA as well.
     
    Torsten Kirschner, Sep 11, 2003
    #8
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