Can SATA and EIDE hard drives co-exist in the newer Dell pc's ?

Discussion in 'Dell' started by rob, Sep 22, 2006.

  1. rob

    rob Guest

    Are the newer Dell pc's SATA and EIDE capable off the mobo? If not,
    can I just add an EIDE cable and pci card to run an EIDE "slave" hard
    drive in it?

    Thanks.
     
    rob, Sep 22, 2006
    #1
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  2. rob

    Tom Scales Guest

    Most have 2 or 4 SATA connectors, but only ONE EIDE connector, which is used
    for the optical drives. If you only have one optical, you could put a drive
    in place of the second optical, but that's it.

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, Sep 22, 2006
    #2
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  3. all that plus you can add a pci card to support additional ide drives...
    weather or not you can make them bootable drives in late model dells is
    unknown to me and hasn't been discussed here as far as i know. you may also
    want to obtain a y connector for an ide type power connector as you will not
    find one readily available if you have two optical drives. alternatively you
    could just buy a inexpensive usb enclosure for your spare ide drive for as
    little as $20 on newegg.com.
     
    Christopher Muto, Sep 22, 2006
    #3
  4. rob

    paulmd Guest

    You can boot from a controller card.
     
    paulmd, Sep 22, 2006
    #4
  5. in theory yes, but do you have actual experience? if so, which card?
    thanks.
     
    Christopher Muto, Sep 22, 2006
    #5
  6. rob

    rob Guest

    But I don't need it bootable but rather a slave. See my orig post.
    thanks.
     
    rob, Sep 22, 2006
    #6
  7. rob

    paulmd Guest

    I've done several in the Promise Ultra 66, Ultra 100 and ultra 133
    family. There was a set of dell computers that actually shipped with an
    ultra 66 hdd controller.

    They all seem to work fine. The ultra 66 is easiest for me, since the
    windows 2000 setup disk actually recognises the controller without need
    of the txtsetup drivers.

    The controllers also work just fine for CDS, and zips.
     
    paulmd, Sep 22, 2006
    #7
  8. rob

    paulmd Guest

    I've done several in the Promise Ultra 66, Ultra 100 and ultra 133
    family. There was a set of dell computers that actually shipped with an
    ultra 66 hdd controller.

    They all seem to work fine. The ultra 66 is easiest for me, since the
    windows 2000 setup disk actually recognises the controller without need
    of the txtsetup drivers.

    The controllers also work just fine for CDS, and zips.
     
    paulmd, Sep 22, 2006
    #8
  9. rob

    paulmd Guest

    Then no problem. A controller card will still work for that.
     
    paulmd, Sep 22, 2006
    #9

  10. PATA hard drives jumpered as Slave are bootable.
    They can hold the boot files (which includes the boot
    manager/loader), and they can hold the OS. All that
    is required is that the hard drive be at the head of
    the BIOS's hard drive boot order. By *default*, the
    hard drive jumpered as Master on IDE ch. 0 is at the
    head of the hard drive boot order, but that can be
    changed in the BIOS by the user, and it can be changed
    by merely removing the Master hard drive. Besides
    this *default* relative boot order, there is no other
    difference between Master and Slave identities. You
    can even put a lone hard drive jumpered as Slave at
    the end of the IDE cable, and it can boot fine, and you
    can also add a hard drive jumpered as Master on the
    middle position on the IDE cable, and if the Slave hard
    drive is at the head of the BIOS's hard drive boot order,
    the Slave will control booting.

    *TimDaniels*
     
    Timothy Daniels, Sep 22, 2006
    #10
  11. Recent model Dells I don't know, but PCI card IDE/ATA controller cards
    have worked quite well in the past for the hard drives that hold the boot
    files and the hard drives that hold the OS. IOW, just as well and as
    identically as the mobo-based controllers. One that is currently sold
    by Dell that handles ATA/133 hard drives and which doesn't have RAID
    capabilities is the one by SIIG: http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=us&l=en&cs=19&sku=A0004774

    Dell currently asks $44 for them, but Dell has priced them several
    times in the past at $38 or $39.

    The one I have routinely controls 3 hard drives with no problems in
    its 3 years of operation.

    *TimDaniels*
     
    Timothy Daniels, Sep 22, 2006
    #11
  12. good to know, thanks.
     
    Christopher Muto, Sep 22, 2006
    #12
  13. The newest ones, e.g., the XPS410, have only SATA connectors on the mobo
    (and use SATA optical drives, of course).
     
    Sparky Spartacus, Sep 22, 2006
    #13
  14. rob

    Tom Scales Guest

    Really? No EIDE at all? Wow, that's a pain. SATA hard drives almost never
    go on sale. I just picked up a 750Gb WD for $269.

    Now THAT's a big hard drive :)

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, Sep 22, 2006
    #14
  15. Yup, 6 SATA connectors on the mobo, no PATA.
    Right, but I've heard size doesn't matter. <vbg>
     
    Sparky Spartacus, Sep 22, 2006
    #15
  16. And those that are not compatible with the integrated PATA boot
    support almost always have boot ROMs on the controller card which may
    appear with a funny name in the boot menu -- works, though.

    --Charles
     
    Charles Marslett, Sep 23, 2006
    #16
  17. rob

    Paul Knudsen Guest

    I am booting from a SATA controller at this time. I don't remember
    the brand (it's been over a year since I bought it), but most any
    brand should work. You'll probably have to load drivers from a
    floppy during install.
     
    Paul Knudsen, Sep 25, 2006
    #17
  18. rob

    Tom Scales Guest

    I believe the latest Dell XP SP2 disk has the SATA drivers slipstreamed.
    Could be wrong.

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, Sep 25, 2006
    #18
  19. rob

    Ben Myers Guest

    With Windows XP Home and XP Pro, it is necessary to load SATA drivers whether
    the SATA controller is integrated onto the motherboard or freestanding. SATA
    was "invented" well after Windows XP hit the streets, and Micro$oft has a
    general policy of not slip-streaming new hardware support into its updates and
    service packs.

    Windows 2000 with SATA? Who knows? Who cares? Win 95/98/ME and DOS with
    SATA? Forget about it... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Sep 25, 2006
    #19
  20. They must because I didn't have to F6 for them when installing XP Pro/SP2.
     
    Sparky Spartacus, Sep 25, 2006
    #20
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