1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

Can you in practice ever overclock a laptop?

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by news.rcn.com, Dec 4, 2005.

  1. news.rcn.com

    news.rcn.com Guest

    I was wondering what these lines in Everest Home edition mean:
    Processor Properties: Manufacturer Intel External Clock 100 MHz Maximum
    Clock 1000 MHz Current Clock 850 MHz

    CPU Type Mobile Intel Pentium IIIE CPU Alias Coppermine, CuMine, A80526

    CPU Speed: CPU Clock 851.88 MHz (original: 850 MHz)

    Can you, - in practice, - ever overclock a laptop? There is a 1GHz version
    of this Latitude (with the exact same model number): Is this something other
    than the same chip overclocked by Dell? I thought that (being a bit
    simplistic about it) every time you ever overclocked a computer, you had to
    put an additional fan in? I am now starting to think about overclocking my
    1.3 GHz Dimension 8100 (which speed was about as slow as the P4 was ever
    made and) in which the chip is surrounded by a huge shroud and gigantic fan
    whick looks as if you couldn't add to it by putting another or an even
    bigger fan in?
     
    news.rcn.com, Dec 4, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. All that means is that you currently have an 850MHz processor, and that your
    board is able to take a 1000MHz processor at maximum.
    That is a piece of string question. Can you overclock some laptops? Yes. Can
    you overclock *your* laptop? Don't know.
    Don't know. Dell don't overclock CPU's, they buy them as marked by Intel.
    However, as the two CPU's are effectively identical bar their multiplier
    factor, some might contend that the 850 is merely an underclocked version of
    the 1000, and vice versa.
    No that statement is far too simplistic. You only need to improve the
    cooling solution if your overclocking attempt results in the system
    producing more heat than the existing arrangements can comfortably
    dissipate.

    In practice, laptops tend to be shipped with thermal solutions that are
    barely capable of servicing the CPU even at default speeds, whereas desktop
    cooling solutions tend to have a tiny bit more headroom.
    You wouldn't want to "add" to the existing shroud/fan/heatsink assembly. If
    you wanted to improve the cooling you would likely have to get rid of the
    current solution and fit a complete replacement.

    However, that is likely to be a moot point. Dell PC's are built with
    components that are deliberately designed to make overclocking as difficult
    as possible. As such, it probably doesn't matter whether you upgrade the
    cooling or not. Chances are you won't be able to overclock this system in
    the first place.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace nospam with pipex in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
     
    Richard Hopkins, Dec 4, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. news.rcn.com

    stargazer257 Guest

    In practice, No. Impossible, No, but very difficult and probably no
    worth it in your situation. The ONLY plausible option would be t
    find a faster processor (1000 MHZ?) and replace the one in th
    laptop, if that is even doable. Your processor has a "locked
    mulitplier, plus it is VERY, VERY doubtful that your laptop'
    motherboard supports other buss speeds in increments that you
    current processor would tolerate

    Everest is probably just reporting the upper range (1000 MHZ) of tha
    processor version from it's database. For example, if testing an AM
    Athlon Thunderbird series chip, it could report current speed as 120
    with a max of 1400 (the highest of the line)

    The "adding a fan when you overclock" is simplistic, as you stated.
    When you overclock (by raising the front side buss speed and/o
    increasing the multiplier for the CPU) the processor will generat
    more heat. If the current heatsink/fan combo is sufficient for th
    increased heat load to dissipate it effeciently, then you don't nee
    to upscale the cooling already present. "Extreme" overclocking woul
    require more drastic means, the most efficient heatsinks, high spee
    fans (Noisy) and major case ventilation....We are not speaking o
    laptops anymore now

    If your laptop is running slow, other options (and I'm just going t
    toss them out here) are

    - ADD MEMOR

    - Clean the system of spyware/adwar

    - Watch out for all those "extra" programs that install with som
    apps. They can really slow down your bootup, and eat up memory

    - Anti-virus/software firewall programs. Necessary but make sure the
    are not "battling one another." My sister had a problem like this.
    Norton A/V with McAffe firewall products. Man, those two program
    didn't like to get along with her system. When reinstalling, we wen
    all McAffe and it booted much quicker. Personally, I use AV
    antivirus (free) and ZoneAlarm firewall (also free) and have bee
    happy with it. (I believe) AVG is a smaller "footprint" than some o
    the mainstream AV's. As for ZoneAlarm, I just plain like it, mainl
    its ease of control compared to the windows firewall. Plus the pric
    is right. :D

    - Or even a complete reinstall of the operating system. Sometimes th
    OS just gets a bit cluttered with old fragments of stuff and a clea
    install is the fastest way to bringing your laptop back to life
     
    stargazer257, Dec 4, 2005
    #3
  4. news.rcn.com

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'rcn.news.com' wrote, in part:
    | Can you, - in practice, - ever overclock a laptop?
    _____

    According to the report, you have a Mobile Pentium III; a CPU especially
    designed for low power consumption and better capabilities than the desktop
    verison of the Pentium III, mainly a larger L2 cache. That CPU is highly
    overclockable in a a large case with a decent heatsink, the ability to raise
    the FrontSide Bus speed and to raise the core CPU voltage. The first two
    conditions aren't available in a laptop, and it is VERY unlikely that the
    last two are either. What you already have is good for just about
    everything but image processing and newer games using 3D acelleration. AND
    it should have long battery life and run cool. Even if you could overclock
    it, the resultant speed increase wouldn't be worth it. A 1 GHz Mobile
    Pentium III would give only around a 15% or less performance increase.

    As for your Pentium 4 1.3 GHz; it is the earliest version of the Pentium 4,
    and uses a higher voltage than the subsequent models, has only a 256 KByte
    L2 cache rather than 512 KByte or 1 MByte, and has a different number of
    pins than the later, more overclockable Pentium 4 CPUs. In addition, Dell
    and other large manufacturers of systems rarely make any provision for
    overclocking. You might TRY overclocking this system just out of curoisity,
    but it is likely not possible, and the potential gains would be small.

    If you've never overclocked before, neither of these systems is a good place
    to start.
    For more information about an approach to overclocking look for an earlier
    post I made in this newsgroup with the subject 'General Guide to
    Overclocking the Intel CPU' on November 18, 2005.

    Phil Weldon

    "news.rcn.com" <news.rnc.com> wrote in message
    |I was wondering what these lines in Everest Home edition mean:
    | Processor Properties: Manufacturer Intel External Clock 100 MHz Maximum
    | Clock 1000 MHz Current Clock 850 MHz
    |
    | CPU Type Mobile Intel Pentium IIIE CPU Alias Coppermine, CuMine,
    A80526
    |
    | CPU Speed: CPU Clock 851.88 MHz (original: 850 MHz)
    |
    | Can you, - in practice, - ever overclock a laptop? There is a 1GHz
    version
    | of this Latitude (with the exact same model number): Is this something
    other
    | than the same chip overclocked by Dell? I thought that (being a bit
    | simplistic about it) every time you ever overclocked a computer, you had
    to
    | put an additional fan in? I am now starting to think about overclocking
    my
    | 1.3 GHz Dimension 8100 (which speed was about as slow as the P4 was ever
    | made and) in which the chip is surrounded by a huge shroud and gigantic
    fan
    | whick looks as if you couldn't add to it by putting another or an even
    | bigger fan in?
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Dec 4, 2005
    #4
  5. news.rcn.com

    news.rcn.com Guest

    Many thanks for all your answers guys: I suspected that what was said in
    this thread was the case as suggested by the wording of my OP. (But I
    didn't know that Dell made it so difficult to overclock their products. It
    would make sense however, with a company which rushes products to market
    with advanced specs to beat the competition and then lets their customers do
    the soak testing; that they wouldn't want to let those customers
    deliberately exert more pressure on their components than had already been
    put on them by the company).
     
    news.rcn.com, Dec 5, 2005
    #5
  6. news.rcn.com

    Augustus Guest

    Can you, - in practice, - ever overclock a laptop? There is a 1GHz
    Generally no, you can't overclock a laptop, other that actually sticking in
    another higher speed CPU that the BIOS and m/b can handle. Almost every
    laptop I've ever seen has a BIOS that will not allow FSB changes or other
    necessary tweaks. Laptops typically have major heat dissipation issues. You
    can often overclock the GPU with Rivatuner or ATI Tool depending on your
    particular gfx chipset, but again, heat is the problem, and very few laptops
    have decent GPU's and dedicated memory so it's somewhat a moot point.
     
    Augustus, Dec 5, 2005
    #6
  7. It isn't that they "make it so difficult." Rather, it's that there is no
    good reason for them to design it with the more expensive parts to support
    overclocking (after all, you bought an x-GHz machine, not a "maybe or maybe
    not" y-GHz machine) nor any incentive to go through the pain and misery of
    the bazillions of support phone calls that go something like "I tried to
    make it go 5 GHz but it don't do NOTHING at ALL. Whadda I do now? Whadda I
    do now?" and the "why won't your piece of junk overclock to 10 terahertz?"

    Home builders buying individual parts is another matter. YOU are making the
    decision to gamble but would you buy an assembled unit whose specs read
    something like "3GHz, plus or minus 500Mhz, it depends on your luck, and it
    might lock up, or maybe not. Up to you to test it. Bon chance." (and if it
    was guaranteed to do y-GHz it'd be sold as y-Ghz, not x-GHz).

    Try convincing management that's going to be a boffo selling feature.
     
    David Maynard, Dec 6, 2005
    #7
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.