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Centrino 1.6 compiles code nearly twice as fast as a Dual Processor P4 Xeon 2.4Ghz

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by George, Nov 1, 2003.

  1. George

    George Guest

    I still can't believe it and I've timed it up, down and inside out.

    The Dual Xeon is a $3000.00 plus box and is the highest end box you
    could get from Dell not that long ago. Fastest IDE, Fastest bus etc.

    We have a very large set of sources to compile 1/2 million lines or
    so.

    It is all "managed" C++ code. It takes 20 minutes to build on the Dual
    Xeon box (note Visual Stidio does not take advantage of the dual
    processor).

    My T40p does it in 11 minutes. Same exact tools and sources.

    Both machines have 1 gig of memory.

    The laptop has 7200 RPM drive. Xeon I'm not sure drive wise but I'm
    sure it's at least 7200 RPM.

    All I can think of is that this task of compiling really likes the
    Centrino cache.
     
    George, Nov 1, 2003
    #1
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  2. George

    Andrew Guest

    : I still can't believe it and I've timed it up, down and inside out.

    : The Dual Xeon is a $3000.00 plus box and is the highest end box you
    : could get from Dell not that long ago. Fastest IDE, Fastest bus etc.

    : We have a very large set of sources to compile 1/2 million lines or
    : so.

    : It is all "managed" C++ code. It takes 20 minutes to build on the Dual
    : Xeon box (note Visual Stidio does not take advantage of the dual
    : processor).

    : My T40p does it in 11 minutes. Same exact tools and sources.

    : All I can think of is that this task of compiling really likes the
    : Centrino cache.

    Bingo. If an application causes a ton of cache misses, Pentium M will
    win big time. At the other extreme, if an application causes very few
    cache misses, the large cache of the Pentium M gives almost no
    performance benefit and other CPU's will have the advantage.

    Andrew
    --
    ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
    *******************************************************************
    ----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
    ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
    *******************************************************************
     
    Andrew, Nov 1, 2003
    #2
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  3. George

    michel Guest

    I would not be so sure : from benchmarks I did myself some time ago
    (Celeron@500Mhz/128Kb L2 vs PIII@500) POVRay doesn't take benefits of the
    CPU L2 cache (results were equal) and if I believe Roland Mösl, his
    benchmarks with the P-M where very good.
     
    michel, Nov 1, 2003
    #3
  4. George

    yuki Guest

    I have found the similar result in the compile time.
    At work, it takes about 25mins for a full build on a Dell 1.8Ghz desktop.
    Thinkpad T40p does it in about 12mins.
    I had to try this a few times on the Thinkpad to make sure it was not a
    fluke.

    I am about to upgrade my home AMD system.
    My home system will have twice the RAM, but I still think the Thinkpad will
    be faster.

    yuki
     
    yuki, Nov 2, 2003
    #4
  5. George

    Whelan Guest

    I've been looking at P4s @ 2.4ghz. I'm trying to balance between cost and
    not being substandard too soon.

    What would be a comparable Ghz choice if buying a Centrino? Not cutting edge
    but a smart purchase point?
    Nan
    (I ordered an Inspiron 8500 but am now thinking I should have bought the
    8600 instead.)
     
    Whelan, Nov 2, 2003
    #5
  6. George

    Wolverine Guest

    Based on user accounts and unscientific benchmarks run by owners of
    Pentium Ms, an equivalent to 2.4 ghs would be in the 1.2-1.4 ghz
    Pentium M.

    Dont take my word for it because the sheer speed of Pentium M depends
    on the application being run. You have to check your priorities.
    However, for a laptop, the wisest way to go is to get a Pentium M over
    the "hot" Pentium 4.

    If you want to be smart though, Why not get a Pentium 3 1.2 Ghz. They
    are still plenty fast with the right HDD and memory. Unless your a
    gamer, avoid Pentium 4 like a plague.

    Or if you can wait, Intel is upgrading the current Pentium M to have
    at least 2 GB cache and higher clockspeed. But that is in my opinion
    way too overkill.
     
    Wolverine, Nov 3, 2003
    #6
  7. George

    Andrew Guest

    : Based on user accounts and unscientific benchmarks run by owners of
    : Pentium Ms, an equivalent to 2.4 ghs would be in the 1.2-1.4 ghz
    : Pentium M.

    : Dont take my word for it because the sheer speed of Pentium M depends
    : on the application being run. You have to check your priorities.
    : However, for a laptop, the wisest way to go is to get a Pentium M over
    : the "hot" Pentium 4.

    : If you want to be smart though, Why not get a Pentium 3 1.2 Ghz. They
    : are still plenty fast with the right HDD and memory.

    Because, at least in the US, you can't find new Pentium 3 laptops
    anymore.

    : Unless your a gamer, avoid Pentium 4 like a plague.

    Nonsense. P4-based laptops are fine if you find one that is well
    designed. Consider the heat issues and the fan noise and look at a
    few models in action before buying. Not all P4 laptops are equal.

    I bought my Toshiba 2GHZ Celeron laptop seven months ago and I am very
    happy with it. Today's Mobile Celeron mostly is the same as a P4 (P4 may
    have a larger cache). I am not a gamer, but I do care about
    performance and this laptop is not slow. My machine does not run hot
    - it gets warm, and the fan does come on but it's quiet and doesn't
    bother me at all (I'm picky!). The Pentium 4-M (not to be confused
    with Pentium M) may run a little cooler. For an entry-level laptop, a
    Celeron is fine at least in my Toshiba. Again, try before you buy.

    Get a Pentium M/Centrino only if battery life is really crucial. It's
    still more expensive than the older CPU's, but that is changing
    gradually.

    : Or if you can wait, Intel is upgrading the current Pentium M to have
    : at least 2 GB cache and higher clockspeed. But that is in my opinion
    : way too overkill.

    The larger cache becomes more important as the clock speed is
    increased. Have no doubt that Intel simulates the performance
    with larger cache sizes ahead of time and would not make a chip with a
    larger cache unless it really makes a difference, as the larger cache
    increases chip cost. A larger cache may also improve power
    consumption.

    Andrew
    --
    ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
    *******************************************************************
    ----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
    ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
    *******************************************************************
     
    Andrew, Nov 3, 2003
    #7
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