Cleaning out old unused programs

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Gary, Apr 26, 2014.

  1. Gary

    Gary Guest

    I have a bad habit of finding too many programs (usually free) and
    installing them on my Mac Pro. Now, after about 5 years of this
    addiction, my computer is rebelling with degraded performance. I would
    like to identify programs that were installed a long time ago and have
    not been used for a long time, so that I might uninstall them.

    Does anyone know of a utility that will help identify such programs
    (old install date, not been opened in a long time)? Thanks in advance
    for any help you might offer.
     
    Gary, Apr 26, 2014
    #1
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  2. Gary

    nospam Guest

    one has nothing to do with the other.

    unused apps just take up space. they do not affect performance in any
    way if you are not using them (and many times even if you are).

    the cause of the performance issues is due to something else.
    there are uninstall utilities but they don't actually work properly.
    all they do is search for files with the same name as the app and
    delete those too. many times that's fine but it isn't always, since
    there's a chance it can delete something it shouldn't.

    searching for related files is also something you can do yourself, if
    you really want. again, it doesn't affect performance at all. unused
    apps just take up space.

    however, if you really want to delete unused apps, just drag them to
    the trash. a few apps might have an uninstaller, in which case you
    should use that, and it will safely remove any other parts, such as
    kernel extensions, startup daemons, etc.
     
    nospam, Apr 26, 2014
    #2
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  3. Gary

    Alan Browne Guest

    Installed apps that aren't used do not cause system performance issues.

    You might try something like Onyx which will methodically clean out
    cache files and so on. I've used in the past but it's been a few years.
    You need to DL the version that matches your OS version.
    Open your Applications folder and sort by "Date Last Opened". (If there
    is no such column, add it by right clicking on the column bar).

    That will tell you when they were last run (or updated). You may need
    to dig into sub folder'd apps to be sure.

    A nice program to erase them is "App Cleaner". Does a more thorough job
    of removing files related to the program you're deleting.

    While that's not strictly necessary, I have had trouble with
    re-installing some apps afterwards that were not well removed the first
    time. AppCleaner does a good job in that sense.
     
    Alan Browne, Apr 26, 2014
    #3
  4. Lots of "MacClean" programs exist that find duplicates, old-untouched
    files, and old applications and list them for you to delete. I remember
    a horrendous program called Spring Cleaning that was bought by Smith
    Micro. It's way overpriced at $40. Leopard Cache Cleaner (or whatever
    version of MacOS you're running), File Buddy, and MacPilot all do this
    sort of thing.

    The problem, I think, is that there's no record of "when was the last
    time I ran this program", AFAIK (atime updates are disabled on the
    volume in Unix parlance). So, you're going to have to go through the
    list of applications *by hand* and delete them by yourself.

    These apps can be very dangerous if you just let them do their thing
    without at least reviewing what it's going to trash. Do a backup first
    before you do anything. But of course, you do backups regularly anyway,
    so that's taken as a given.

    I use AppDelete currently to clean out applications once I've identified
    that I no longer use them, but AppCleaner is also good.
     
    Michael Vilain, Apr 26, 2014
    #4
  5. Gary

    dorayme Guest

    Put them in list view and look at the Date Modified and Date Created
    columns, if necessary add those columns under the View menu in Finder.
    This should give you some good clues.

    As nospam says mainly. Look at other things first at least. But if so
    many unused apps are taking up so much space as to make your operating
    drive crowded and you have no other drive, there may be a factor here.
     
    dorayme, Apr 26, 2014
    #5
  6. Gary

    Your Name Guest

    Simply having applications on the computer is not going to degrade
    performance, except those that are system extensions or perhaps if
    you're severly running out of disk space.

    For performance loss it's best to start with the regular maintenance,
    etc. routines to clear out things like old caches.

    Some applications have an uninstall option on the original install disk
    / disk image or in the Zip / Stuffit archive. The easiest way to get
    rid of most normal applications (i.e. not system extensions) is to
    simply drag them to the Trash. Some system extensions you can also just
    drag out of the System Prefences window. They may leave behind extra
    files, but usually they're small and not worth worrying about.

    There are quite a few "cleaner" applications that claim to remove an
    application and all the associated files, but in reality you still need
    to know what you're doing since they do come up with false positives
    and still can't find everything.
     
    Your Name, Apr 26, 2014
    #6
  7. Gary

    Nelson Guest

    Not true, at least for all apps. Many install daemons and other
    background processes that can cause problems. For example, I have
    Paralells Desktop installed that I never use and I regularly have to
    kill off a process called "parallels service" or something like that
    that uses 200% of the cpu.
     
    Nelson, Apr 28, 2014
    #7
  8. Gary

    nospam Guest

    there are a few exceptions, but as a rule, unused apps are completely
    inert and just take up space.

    parallels has an uninstaller that uninstalls all the various bits that
    it scatters.
     
    nospam, Apr 29, 2014
    #8
  9. Gary

    Your Name Guest

    Some of those sorts of things (automatic update checking is another)
    can be turned off in the application's Preferences or the Startup Items
    options of the user's System Preferences.

    Applications with an Uninstall option will (usually) remove those too
    when removing the application.

    The various "app cleaner" software may or may not pick them up as
    belonging to an application being removed, and may pick up items that
    aren't related to an application being removed.
     
    Your Name, Apr 29, 2014
    #9
  10. Gary

    JF Mezei Guest

    There can be more obscur stuff such as Stuff in the
    /System/Library/LaunchDaemons and the other simular directory, which
    also require removal in the launchd database with launcdctl commands to
    disable/remove that entry.


    However, general apps tend to not install stuff there. But it is a
    convenient place to put in weekly chcking for software updates. There
    are some in /system/library and some in ~/library
     
    JF Mezei, Apr 29, 2014
    #10
  11. "Gary" wrote in message

    I have a bad habit of finding too many programs (usually free) and
    installing them on my Mac Pro. Now, after about 5 years of this
    addiction, my computer is rebelling with degraded performance. I
    would
    like to identify programs that were installed a long time ago and have
    not been used for a long time, so that I might uninstall them.

    Does anyone know of a utility that will help identify such programs
    (old install date, not been opened in a long time)? Thanks in advance
    for any help you might offer.

    ***************************************************

    Wrong group. I'll repost for you
     
    Puffin Killer, May 8, 2014
    #11
  12. Gary

    Alan Baker Guest

    And you claim that I need attention!

    LOL
     
    Alan Baker, May 8, 2014
    #12
  13. Gary

    Warren Oates Guest

    That was my feeling. How is this the wrong group?
     
    Warren Oates, May 8, 2014
    #13
  14. Absolutely. PuffinKiller is one of the advocacy trolls.

    For the OP, I use Clean My Mac to get rid of old programs and files and
    it seems to do a good job of it. Of course someone will come along and
    now tell me how terrible it is. :)
     
    Lloyd E Parsons, May 8, 2014
    #14
  15. Maybe this is the group he reposted it to?
     
    Michelle Steiner, May 8, 2014
    #15
  16. No, he reposted to CSMA primarily to start a trolling thread. That's
    all he does.
     
    Lloyd E Parsons, May 8, 2014
    #16
  17. "Lloyd E Parsons" wrote in message

    Why would you need any add-on? Doesn't the Mac come with a full range
    of utilities for that sort of thing? No?!!!! I'm shocked.

    BTW: Do you think Jolly Rogers wife would swallow my dick wad?
     
    Puffin Killer, May 8, 2014
    #17
  18. Look who the post came from. Puffin Killer is a nym for zara and has
    used a very large number of other nyms. His MO is to make some stupid
    statement, then resort to insults when challenged. He is a troll, pure
    and simple. Ignore him, or if you want to engage with him, do it in the
    proper group, CSMA.
     
    David Fritzinger, May 9, 2014
    #18
  19. He is a troll, pure and simple.
     
    David Fritzinger, May 9, 2014
    #19
  20. "David Fritzinger" wrote in message

    Kono the pool boy still balling your wife, Dorkey?
     
    Puffin Killer, May 9, 2014
    #20
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