Computer clock losing time

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Bob, Aug 14, 2005.

  1. Bob

    Bob Guest

    I have had my A7V-333 for a few years and in the last couple of weeks my
    computer clock has lost about 3 hours twice. Could this be caused by
    something else besides the battery? Is the battery hard to change? Thanks in
    advance.

    Bob
     
    Bob, Aug 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. Bob

    Dan Spears Guest

    I had a PC that had the same problem and it turned out to be a bad battery.

    If you live in the USA you can buy PC batteries at a lot of stores. Best
    Buy, Wal-Mart, Target, Sears, Home Depot, Office Depot, Office Max, Staples.
    The last two I bought were at Best Buy. Cost about $4.99 for two.

    Changing out your battery is a piece of cake. Will take about one minute.
    Pop it out and pop in another one. The only negative is you will lose your
    Bio's custom settings. Before you swap out the battery go into your Bio's
    and write down your custom setting. After you swap out the battery go back
    into the Bio's and reset.

    This should fix your problem.

    Good Luck.
     
    Dan Spears, Aug 14, 2005
    #2
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  3. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Thank You.


     
    Bob, Aug 14, 2005
    #3
  4. Dan wrote on Sun, 14 Aug 2005 11:15:24 -0400:

    DS> If you live in the USA you can buy PC batteries at a lot of
    DS> stores. Best Buy, Wal-Mart, Target, Sears, Home Depot,
    DS> Office Depot, Office Max, Staples. The last two I bought
    DS> were at Best Buy. Cost about $4.99 for two.

    DS> Changing out your battery is a piece of cake. Will take
    DS> about one minute. Pop it out and pop in another one. The
    DS> only negative is you will lose your Bio's custom settings.
    DS> Before you swap out the battery go into your Bio's and
    DS> write down your custom setting. After you swap out the
    DS> battery go back into the Bio's and reset.

    DS> This should fix your problem.

    DS> Good Luck.

    A remarkable coincidence: I was about to post the same question
    myself having just observed the same symptoms in my 3-year old
    computer. I don't know how long the mother board sat in the
    store however before it was installed in the custom-built
    machine. I also had been worrying about how much of the BIOS'
    settings I would lose and your post is most encouraging. I don't
    have any specs so do you know if there are several types of
    battery or is one standard?

    Thanks very much indeed

    James Silverton.
     
    James Silverton, Aug 14, 2005
    #4
  5. James wrote to Dan Spears on Sun, 14 Aug 2005 14:04:58 -0400:
    DS>> Changing out your battery is a piece of cake. Will take
    DS>> about one minute. Pop it out and pop in another one. The
    DS>> only negative is you will lose your Bio's custom settings.
    DS>> Before you swap out the battery go into your Bio's and
    DS>> write down your custom setting. After you swap out the
    DS>> battery go back into the Bio's and reset.

    DS>> This should fix your problem.

    DS>> Good Luck.

    JS> A remarkable coincidence: I was about to post the same
    question
    JS> myself having just observed the same symptoms in my 3-year
    JS> old computer. I don't know how long the mother board sat in
    JS> the store however before it was installed in the
    JS> custom-built machine. I also had been worrying about how
    JS> much of the BIOS' settings I would lose and your post is
    JS> most encouraging. I don't have any specs so do you know if
    JS> there are several types of battery or is one standard?

    I realize that I am probably reinventing the wheel but I could
    not find a utility that I trusted to record BIOS settings, Prt
    Scr does not work during boot and writing them down is tedious.
    I finally photographed the screens with a hand held digital
    camera and printed the pictures on my laser printer. The results
    were a little shaky but quite readable. I *know* I could have
    done better with a tripod!

    James Silverton.
     
    James Silverton, Aug 14, 2005
    #5
  6. Bob

    Paul Guest

    Changing the battery doesn't guarantee that you'll lose the
    settings. I suggested that to someone, and they proved me
    wrong. If you are quick, enough energy is stored in the board
    to maintain the settings for a short time. Using CLRTC with
    the battery out, would drain it real quick. Accidently shorting
    the two battery terminals would also drain it quick. Unless you
    drop the battery on the floor, I think the transition could be
    quite smooth for you.

    Don't forget to unplug the computer before working on it. From
    an ESD perspective, it helps to have the PC at the same potential
    as your body. Sitting the PC in your lap while working on it,
    will make it easier to have some contact with the metal of the
    case.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Aug 14, 2005
    #6
  7. Bob

    milleron Guest

    Gee, to make sure I didn't lose settings, the last time I did it, I
    performed the operation with the computer powered on. It went very
    well, but just how stupid was I? Please try to go a little easy on
    me.
    Ron
     
    milleron, Aug 15, 2005
    #7
  8. Bob

    Paul Guest

    A conservative rule, is not to have any power on inside the
    computer when working on it. It is to prevent accidents, like
    pulling and reinserting DIMMs when you forgot about the
    standby power etc. People have damaged DIMMs doing that, and
    if you get in the habit of turning off the power first (by
    unplugging), it just makes working in there that much safer.

    Looking at an Intel reference schematic, the battery path
    looks like this. I'd also like to look at an AMD schematic,
    but don't have any in my collection.

    |\ |
    3.3V_standby -------| \|-----------------+
    reg from 5vsb |/ | |
    |
    1K ohm |\ | | To Southbridge
    Battery ----/\ /\ -----| \|-------+-----+---------->
    \/ \/ |/ | |
    resistor BAT54C --- 1uF
    diode --- filter
    | cap
    |
    __+__
    ___ GND
    _

    The battery socket in this case, is well protected. The
    1K ohm resistor means little current can flow in that
    path in any case. The BAT54C diodes prevent reverse
    current flow. I guess you could jam a screwdriver in
    the battery socket, and the motherboard would be none the
    wiser, if +5VSB is still running. (On some motherboards,
    CLRTC is downstream of this circuit, and there, you really
    should have the power off if clearing the CMOS, as some
    of the CLRTC circuits are pretty stupid. The upper BAT54C
    gets burned in that case. The CLRTC method varies from
    chipset to chipset, and without documentation, powering
    off is the safe thing to do.)

    But if you dropped any metal tools in the computer while
    doing this operation, who knows what would happen. I'm just
    trying to plan for the butter-fingers among us :) Like,
    how would you answer a question where the poster said
    "I dropped my screwdriver, there were some sparks, now
    it won't boot, can you tell me whats wrong ?" :) I don't
    want to contemplate questions like that.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Aug 15, 2005
    #8
  9. Bob

    milleron Guest

    Thanks,
    I promise to follow the rules hereafter ;-)

    Ron
     
    milleron, Aug 15, 2005
    #9
  10. Bob

    Dexter Guest

    It is very easy to do Ron so do not go kicking yourself I did the same
    thing the other week then S**T myself when I found out what I had
    done.
    I wasn't doing much in there changing over a sata cable I think but it
    could have been disastrous I have twenty years of going into puters
    and this was the first time I have done this stupid trick .
     
    Dexter, Aug 16, 2005
    #10
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