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Connecting buttons with MSP430F2013 for Input Output with software

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by anmol, Jun 9, 2008.

  1. anmol

    anmol Guest

    Hi!
    I want to connect 5 buttons with the MSP430F2013 MCU . I want to use
    the buttons for input with a software . Please help and tell me how
    to go about the task . If you have any tutorial , curcuit diagrams ,
    videos please give the download location or the url of the site .

    Regards
    Anmol
     
    anmol, Jun 9, 2008
    #1
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  2. anmol

    Tauno Voipio Guest


    Study project - homework?
     
    Tauno Voipio, Jun 9, 2008
    #2
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  3. anmol

    anmol Guest

    It's a project but not a school or college project . Please help me in
    connecting the buttons with MCU for input to software .

    Thanks
    Anmol
     
    anmol, Jun 10, 2008
    #3
  4. anmol

    Leon Guest

    Everything you need is in the data sheet and the User's Guide. You'll
    also find plenty of application information on the TI web site. If you
    are really stuck, try the MSP430 Yahoo group.

    Leon
     
    Leon, Jun 10, 2008
    #4
  5. anmol

    anmol Guest

    Sorry Tim if i sounded arrogant but i was trying to sound that .
    Thanks for the reply and also for correcting me as this one is my
    first post in any of the groups .
    Once again thanks for taking out time and writing a reply :)
     
    anmol, Jun 10, 2008
    #5
  6. anmol

    anmol Guest

    Sorry Tim if i sounded arrogant but i was not trying to sound in that
    manner .
    Thanks for the reply and also for correcting me as this one is my
    first post in any of the groups .
    Once again thanks for taking out time and writing a reply :)
     
    anmol, Jun 10, 2008
    #6
  7. If you can get the EZ430-F2013 ($20 last I checked without a coupon
    discount), you might already have most of what you'd need not only to
    write code and program the device but also to wire in your switches as
    Tim suggested. It plugs into a USB port on your computer and can use
    the IAR Kickstart IDE and compiler for programming in assembly, c, or
    c++ or some combination of those. There are some through-holes inside
    the tiny device and a small open rectangle in the side for bringing
    out signal wires for your switches and a ground/Vcc that you might
    take advantage of to get started quickly. The unit includes a small
    green LED inside the case, as well, that you can use for blinking or
    some other indicator as you may want.

    If that device isn't inappropriate for your needs, I can provide a
    small tutorial set of programs I wrote to get you started using the
    device, but they do NOT deal with switches. They are written in c and
    intended to let you learn about controlling the LED in various ways.
    But they do get you learning about controlling the CPU speed and using
    the timer. Which may help in its own way.

    ....

    Separately, depending on how you intend using switches and what kinds
    of external components you are willing to include, you can also
    consider learning about various topologies in wiring up switches. Tim
    wisely held to the simplest and most independent approach -- a switch
    and a pull-up resistor -- but there are other methods you can also
    consider if the number of switches grows and the number of I/O pins
    available is constrained. The whole subject of switches, push button
    and otherwise, and microcontrollers is a very interesting one in its
    own right and a very good one to use in learning about micros,
    software, and various hardware design approaches for user input via
    buttons. Debouncing is an very important part, but it's not the only
    interesting aspect. Enjoy it, fully.

    Jon
     
    Jonathan Kirwan, Jun 10, 2008
    #7
  8. [Schematics of pull-up resistor and switch]

    Just an addition to Tim's post. I don't know about the MSP430F2013
    specifically, but many microcontrollers already have the resistor
    internally on some of the pins. All you need to do is enable it somehow.
    On AVRs it is done by writing to a port configured as inputs, but I'm
    sure each manufacturer has some unique, equally wacky way to do it.

    So before you warm up your solder iron, it might pay to check out
    the data sheet carefully.
     
    Pertti Kellomäki, Jun 11, 2008
    #8
  9. Many do, though the pull-up may be a bit weak.
    Some even have several ways to enable the same thing, in fact. ;)
    Always good advice!

    Jon
     
    Jonathan Kirwan, Jun 11, 2008
    #9
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