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Connecting lappy to desktop

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by spider40, Jul 26, 2006.

  1. spider40

    spider40 Guest

    Just to clarify a few points for me. If I have a desktop PC running XP
    Home connected to the net by broadband modem via usb, and I want a
    lappy to connect to it to share files, printer, and the net, do I just
    get a ethernet cable and connect the 2 vis the ethernet sockets? (they
    both have one) Then set up create small netwark and internet connection
    sharing? I can't connect the lappy to the modem, even though it is a
    Netopia wireless one, as I don't have the WEP key. Any feedback welcome.
     
    spider40, Jul 26, 2006
    #1
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  2. spider40

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    Yes you can do this, but you will require a crossed ethernet cable. Once
    you have done this you need to manually assign IP addresses and away it
    should go.

    As an alternative, if both PCs have firewire connectors, you can use a
    standard firewire lead. Again you asign IP adresses and it will transfer
    faster than ethernet.

    Windows XP supports either configuration as supplied.
     
    M.I.5¾, Jul 26, 2006
    #2
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  3. spider40

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    That's basically right, but if you're connecting two PCs directly rather
    than via a hub or switch, you'll need a cross-over ethernet cable rather
    than a straight-through cable.
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
    Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
    monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
    PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
     
    Roger Mills, Jul 26, 2006
    #3
  4. The best way is to get a router. The router connects to the internet,
    both the laptop and the desktop connect to the router (neither through
    each other, but rather both as equals to the router). That will give
    you internet service on both computers. To network between the
    computers (printer and file sharing), put them both in the same
    workgroup and they should see each other as well as the internet.
     
    Barry Watzman, Jul 26, 2006
    #4
  5. spider40

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    Contrary to popular belief, they don't have to be in the same workgroup when
    operated through a router. They will see each other anyway. The workgroup
    only appears to apply to peer to peer connections.
     
    M.I.5¾, Jul 26, 2006
    #5
  6. spider40

    spider40 Guest

    Does that mean I still have to use a crossover cable? can I use the
    modem for my broadband? it is the netopia one from eircom.
     
    spider40, Jul 27, 2006
    #6
  7. spider40

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    You need a straight-through cable to connect each computer to the router.
    [Having said that, many routers have auto-sensing ports - and don't mind
    which sort of cable you use].

    I think Barry had a modem/router in mind. This will replace your existing
    modem *and* share the internet connection.

    If your existing modem connects to the computer using USB, it won't work
    with a router anyway - so it's best to cut your losses and get a single box
    solution.
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
    Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
    monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
    PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
     
    Roger Mills, Jul 27, 2006
    #7
  8. You use a "normal" patch cable (not a crossover cable) for connection
    from the router to the computers connected to it, and also between the
    router and the DSL or cable modem. Yes, you can use it for broadband,
    in fact that is the primary application (it's difficult to use a router
    for dial-up; more commonly for dial-up people use a software router such
    as "internet connection sharing").
     
    Barry Watzman, Jul 27, 2006
    #8
  9. No, I was presuming just a router (or wireless router) with the modem
    remaining separate. Depending on the ISP, you can't aways replace the
    modem.

    I have not seen a cable or DSL modem that did not have an Ethernet
    connection, even if in a particular instance a USB connection was being
    used. Most modern modems (DSL and cable) have both RJ-45 and USB
    connections.


    Roger Mills wrote:
     
    Barry Watzman, Jul 27, 2006
    #9
  10. spider40

    Roger Mills Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    Maybe it depends where you are. In the UK, most ADSL modems are USB-only.
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ______
    Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
    monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
    PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
     
    Roger Mills, Jul 27, 2006
    #10
  11. spider40

    Ozusah Guest

    I one had a USB modem that had no RJ connection at all. It had the form of a
    fish or what. I don't know if these still exist but I have seen them.
     
    Ozusah, Jul 28, 2006
    #11
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