Cooking Bacon on my nForce2 South-Bridge (again).

Discussion in 'Abit' started by Wayne Youngman, Feb 7, 2004.

  1. Hi,

    I just bought myself a new Digital Thermometer today, and the first thing I
    could think of testing was the *South-Bridge* of the NF7-S system I just
    sold.

    Since the machine didn't have any hard-disks I just let it load up memtest
    x86 and loop for a while.

    15 minutes later. . . .the reading from LCD display was. . . .68°C lol!

    I know we discussed this before (a few months ago), but isn't that too hot?
    I did try to find some pre-made heatsinks in the *U.K* but no luck. Why
    didn't anyone start selling heatsinks for the nForce2 boards?

    The South-Bridge is situated very close to the AGP slot so I have no idea
    how people are using Zalman heatsinks, surely they get in the way of the AGP
    card, especially if it has a meaty heatsinks itself?
     
    Wayne Youngman, Feb 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. Wayne Youngman

    Frank Hagan Guest

    I have a different nF2 mobo, but I noticed the Southbridge very warm
    (uncomfortably hot) to the touch also. I just stuck on a passive heatsink of
    appropriate size (no more than a few mm larger) with some frag tape and now
    just warm ;-) If the Mk.I fingertip tells you it's hot, cool it! Everyone
    is always trying to improve the cooling of the Northbridge, video chipset,
    etc... The Southbridge need a little help to ;-)

    FRH
     
    Frank Hagan, Feb 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. Wayne Youngman

    BigBadger Guest

    I'm sure if the chip needed to run cooler it would have a heatsink fitted.
    Having said that I did try a memory heatsink on my NF7 SB...it did keep it
    cooler but this did not result in improvement in any element of the systems
    performance.
     
    BigBadger, Feb 7, 2004
    #3

  4. Hi,
    well I did notice that the some DFI nForce2 boards have a heatsink installed
    on the South-Bridge. Something just tells me that leaving it with no help
    is gonna reduce the life of the board. I mean its running hotter than my
    CPU.

    it's a small thing but it *itches* me from time to time. Between that and
    the (soon to BGA heatsinked)graphics card I think the system temps are
    forced higher.

    There must be something I can buy online in the U.K that will do the job?

    You notice that the Mosfets don't have a heatsink, people mod them (ABIT
    OTES lol). I suppose they are more critical to a stbale system though.
     
    Wayne Youngman, Feb 7, 2004
    #4
  5. Wayne Youngman

    BoroLad Guest

    On Sat, 7 Feb 2004 23:16:34 +0000 (UTC), "Wayne Youngman"

    x2 different heatsink plus fan about a fiver
    http://www.komplett.co.uk/k/ki.asp?...&t=1623&l=3&AvdID=1&CatID=28&GrpID=11&cks=PRL

    passive about 7 quid
    http://www.aria.co.uk/ProductsList.asp?Category=%&Name=chipset&Code=&Submit=Search

    active ' orb ' about twelve quid
    passive about twenty quid
    http://www.chillblast.com/customer/home.php?cat=72

    and thirty quid for the bogs dollocks - Swiftech - MCX159-A
    http://www.overclock.co.uk/customer/home.php?cat=410

    or ten qidid for the copper 'vantec '
    http://www.overclock.co.uk/customer/product.php?productid=16537&cat=410
     
    BoroLad, Feb 9, 2004
    #5
  6. Wayne Youngman

    Homie Guest

    Many semiconductors are designed to run at temps as high as 125c....... but the
    cooler they are kept , the better the slew rates, the better the slew rate, the better
    the thermal efficiency, the better the thermal efficiency, the cooler they run....the
    cooler they run, the longer they last .......
    Cool huh?


    Homie

    --
    Mainboards, Videocards & CPU pin repair.

    http://motherboardrepair.com


    Hi,

    I just bought myself a new Digital Thermometer today, and the first thing I
    could think of testing was the *South-Bridge* of the NF7-S system I just
    sold.

    Since the machine didn't have any hard-disks I just let it load up memtest
    x86 and loop for a while.

    15 minutes later. . . .the reading from LCD display was. . . .68°C lol!

    I know we discussed this before (a few months ago), but isn't that too hot?
    I did try to find some pre-made heatsinks in the *U.K* but no luck. Why
    didn't anyone start selling heatsinks for the nForce2 boards?

    The South-Bridge is situated very close to the AGP slot so I have no idea
    how people are using Zalman heatsinks, surely they get in the way of the AGP
    card, especially if it has a meaty heatsinks itself?
     
    Homie, Feb 9, 2004
    #6

  7. Hehe,
    indeed. I was working from the angle off:

    a) Making the Southbridge as long-living as possible
    b) Stop this little oven from heating up my case (like my 9800, soon to be
    sinked)
     
    Wayne Youngman, Feb 9, 2004
    #7

  8. http://www.komplett.co.uk/k/ki.asp?...&t=1623&l=3&AvdID=1&CatID=28&GrpID=11&cks=PRL



    Hi,
    that *Spire Chipsett cooler bundle JACSA1 Heatsink and fan for
    Chipset*(£4.84) look about the best so far. The rest are for the
    Northbridge no?. On the NF7-S the southbridge chip is pretty close to the
    AGP slot, so using a *Large* heatsink would hamper the graphic card
    installations.

    Thanks for the urls, I don't know how I missed that little *spire* bundle. .
    ..
     
    Wayne Youngman, Feb 9, 2004
    #8
  9. Wayne Youngman

    Hellraiser Guest

    "> it's a small thing but it *itches* me from time to time. Between that
    and
    Indeed there is. They are out of stock at the moment, but this link
    http://www.overclockers.co.uk/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Other_Coolers_57.html
    takes you to Overclockers.co.uk and the Vantec Iceberq CCB-A1C, used to use
    one of these on my old Epox Nforce2 board - used the Iceberq for the
    Northbridge, and it comes with 2 small passive heatsinks one of which fits
    perfectly on the Southbridge. Well worth the tenner or so plus VAT.

    Hellraiser...........>
     
    Hellraiser, Feb 10, 2004
    #9
  10. Wayne Youngman

    ~misfit~ Guest

    You do realise that. even with a heatsink, it will produce just as much heat
    and it will still be released into your case?
     
    ~misfit~, Feb 11, 2004
    #10
  11. Wayne Youngman

    ~misfit~ Guest

    I'm running two Soltek SL-75FRN2-L nForce2 Ultra400 boards and hadn't even
    thought about SB temps until I read this. I held my finger on them and it
    was uncomfortably hot. I had a couple of cheap "Coolermaster" NB 'sinks with
    frag tape on them in my drawer, I'd just bought them for the 40mm fans to
    fit to the passively cooled NB 'sink on these boards. I checked them out and
    I could fit them, with a little overlap (not touching anything live). So
    that's what I've done, I don't know if it'll make any difference to the
    longevity of my boards but they weren't doing any good in the drawer.

    BTW, they didn't make very good contact. The SB seems to be *very* concave.
    However the 'sinks get warm so I'm hoping they're helping and not just
    trapping a pocket of hot air 'tween the sink and the chip. One of them has
    the advantage of being right in the airflow from the AGP card (different
    cards in the machines) so doesn't get as warm as the other.
     
    ~misfit~, Feb 11, 2004
    #11
  12. Wayne Youngman

    ANDREW BELL Guest



    As well as the above, the Vantec Iceberq CCB-A1C (also mentioned)and
    CoolerMaster CRC-U01 RAM chip coolers (used on the SB) have had decent
    reviews.

    The Thermaltake Thinwings also interest me, (see
    http://www.kustompcs.co.uk/product.php?view=2819&PHPSESSID=6c57c73432893e214
    e61a01975eded34
    but I can't find any reviews. Anyone used them?

    Andy
     
    ANDREW BELL, Feb 11, 2004
    #12
  13. Wayne Youngman

    Wblane Guest

    For Bipolar Junction transistors you could throw off the q-point if you cooled
    it too much, depending on the biasing circuit used. This could seriously screw
    up an op-amp circuit's output. Furthermore, for the NPN silicon 2n4877 BJT,
    the datasheet doesn't mention anything about slew rates changing w/temperature.
    It can also run at a Tj(pk) of 200 degrees C.

    -Bill (remove "botizer" to reply via email)
     
    Wblane, Feb 13, 2004
    #13
  14. Wayne Youngman

    John Lewis Guest

    Agreed... However, having adequate design margins to run within timing
    spec at 125 degrees C is not the same as being specified for operation
    at 125 degrees C. Consumer silicon is normally spec'd for continuous
    operation at a maximum 70 degrees C case temperature, unless
    < explicitly stated otherwise > . For example, the latest P4 Northwood
    processors are spec'd by Intel for 70 degrees C and the P4 EE at 64
    degrees C, (both <core> temperatures) for 'reliable' operation.

    [ Above these temperatures, built-in hardware thermal-protection will
    arbitrarily cut-in at an unspecified (by Intel) core temperature to
    lower the internal clock rate to preserve silicon integrity. ]

    Beware of case temperatures in excess of 80 degrees C on high-density
    devices on the latest silicon processes. Thermal stresses on the
    silicon vias and thin-dielectrics. Also, the device density magnifies
    the failure incidence. It just takes one via or one transistor in the
    100million or so in a CPU or GPU to generate a useless lump of
    silicon.

    Devices rated for continuous 125 degrees C operation are low-density
    very conservatively spec'd and normally radiation-hardened too. I
    doubt if Spirit or Opportunity incorporate any large devices on 0.15u
    (or smaller) processes......

    John Lewis
     
    John Lewis, Feb 14, 2004
    #14
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