Create non login accounts for user built servers

Discussion in 'Apple' started by fthomas, Jan 25, 2008.

  1. fthomas

    fthomas Guest

    What's the best way to create non login accounts on Macosx 10.5
    (Darwin 9.0.0) ?

    I want to create separate accounts for servers built by myself like
    mysql, tomcat, svn...
    Unfortunately there is no groupadd/useradd I'm used to use.

    Thomas
     
    fthomas, Jan 25, 2008
    #1
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  2. fthomas

    Clark Martin Guest

    Check out SharePoints, you should be able to find it at
    www.versiontracker.com.

    It lets you add non-login users.
     
    Clark Martin, Jan 26, 2008
    #2
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  3. Are you using Darwin or Darwin+Mac OS X?

    If you're using just Darwin, you'd probably find more help on the
    Darwin user mailing list:
    <http://lists.apple.com/mailman/listinfo/darwinos-users>

    It's quite likely this has changed in Darwin 9 compared to previous
    versions, as Darwin 9 reflects Leopard and Leopard changed this.
     
    Steven Fisher, Jan 26, 2008
    #3
  4. fthomas

    Simon Slavin Guest

    Create it as a normal account.
    Open the 'Accounts' System Preferences panel.
    Unlock it.
    Control-click on the list entry (on the left) for that account.
    Pick 'Advanced Options'.
    Change the shell or home directory to do whatever you think 'non login'
    means.

    Warning to inexperienced users: you can completely mess up your login
    system by messing with these settings, to the point where nobody can log
    in. Don't mess with stuff you don't understand.

    Simon.
     
    Simon Slavin, Jan 28, 2008
    #4
  5. fthomas

    taylorwp1 Guest

    Up through Tiger, the Netinfo application allowed you to edit
    accounts. What it showed for server type accounts, such as sshd,
    mysql or nobody is that the field designating the home directory was
    set to /var/empty and the field designating the login shell was set
    to /usr/bin/false which is consistent with other versions of unix. In
    a few other cases, such as the lp daemon, the home is set to the
    specific directory where it operates, in lp's case /var/spool/cups.
    www, the user for apache is set to /Library/WebServer; it's login
    shell is still set to /usr/bin/false.

    I understand that the Netinfo Manager has been deprecated in Leopard,
    so I'm not sure what the tool is. However, because of the requirement
    for backward compatibility among so many third party programs, I
    expect that you will find that those two values are what should
    ultimately be set for those two datafields for your daemon user. If
    you're building from packages, those packages probably come with
    install scripts applicable to other Unix systems. In almost all cases
    that require a special user to be created, you have to install with
    root/administrator privileges, so the daemon user can be created. It
    may be tedious, but I recommend you go through the install script and
    find out what those packages do when creating the user.

    Good luck.

    W. Taylor
     
    taylorwp1, Jan 29, 2008
    #5
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