1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

Creating DOS bootable CD

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by davisc02, May 3, 2006.

  1. davisc02

    davisc02 Guest

    Does anyone know how to create a bootable DOS CD so I can boot my XP
    laptop into DOS. Please note this laptop does not have a floppy.

    Thanks
     
    davisc02, May 3, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. davisc02

    TheBurgerMan Guest

    TheBurgerMan, May 3, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. davisc02

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    .... only provides bootable floppy images for DOS, thus not solving the
    problem.
     
    M.I.5¾, May 3, 2006
    #3
  4. davisc02

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    To be quite honest, the easiest way out of your dilema is to buy yourself a
    USB floppy drive. They cost peanuts. You then have the choice of booting
    from a floppy or using the floppy to create a bootable CD. Any laptop new
    enough not to have a floppy drive should boot from either, once the BIOS is
    set up to do so.

    Note: that many BIOSs do not offer the option to boot from a USB floppy
    until one is actually connected.
     
    M.I.5¾, May 3, 2006
    #4
  5. davisc02

    TheBurgerMan Guest

    There is a section dealing with bootable CD's, thus enabling you to solve
    your problem without buying addition hardware.

    --
    Thanks,
    TheBurgerMan
    at
    gmail.com
    --
     
    TheBurgerMan, May 3, 2006
    #5
  6. You'll need a boot floppy image, or a boot floppy and a
    program like winimage to create the image. Then you can
    create a bootable CD using Nero and your boot image.

    Be sure your BIOS is set to boot from the CD first.

    Mike
     
    Michael Wileman, May 3, 2006
    #6
  7. All of the other posts on this seem good, but the easiest way to do this
    is going to be on another computer that has a floppy. You don't need to
    create the CD on the target machine. DOS is DOS, unlike Windows.

    Simple way:

    1. Create a DOS bootable floppy. Test it. Put all desired/necessary
    utilities on it. In particular it MUST have CD-ROM support (that means
    MSCDEX, a driver for the CD drive, and a suitable autoexec.bat and
    config.sys).

    2. Use the create bootable CD function in Nero or Roxio. Use the
    floppy just made as the source of your boot image.

    Typically, the floppy image on the boot CD will appear as A:, while the
    rest of the CD's contents will appear as some higher letter disk drive
    (often D:).
     
    Barry Watzman, May 3, 2006
    #7
  8. davisc02

    Justme Guest

    Is your laptops hard drive formatted NTFS or FAT32, if it's the former DOS
    won't see it.
     
    Justme, May 3, 2006
    #8
  9. davisc02

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    Yes, but that was for windows NT. The OP specifically wanted a DOS disk.
     
    M.I.5¾, May 4, 2006
    #9
  10. davisc02

    Doug Warner Guest

    Most CDRW software has a "bootable CD" function, where it requests an
    actual bootable floppy or an IMG file, and uses it to make a bootable
    CD. It then boots to an A: prompt, with all the files on the original
    floppy.
    If the CD is mounted in WIndows, it appears to be empty.

    IBM RecordNow (Sonic) and Nero can do this.
    Not sure about Roxio EZ-CD Cremator, , since I'll never touch it
    again.
    http://webpages.charter.net/dwarner2/roxiovirus.jpg
     
    Doug Warner, May 8, 2006
    #10
  11. davisc02

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    Most CDRW software has a "bootable CD" function, where it requests an
    actual bootable floppy or an IMG file, and uses it to make a bootable
    CD. It then boots to an A: prompt, with all the files on the original
    floppy.
    If the CD is mounted in WIndows, it appears to be empty.

    IBM RecordNow (Sonic) and Nero can do this.
    Not sure about Roxio EZ-CD Cremator, , since I'll never touch it
    again.
    http://webpages.charter.net/dwarner2/roxiovirus.jpg

    -----------------------------------------

    I've looked at your page and can honestly say that I have never seen the
    problem that you have experienced with any Roxio product. It is quite
    likely that roxio replaced a rogue .dll file installed by something else - a
    common occurence, though XP is supposed to have overcome this, not always
    successfully

    Having said that, the current Easy Media Creator, burns multisession disks
    in Mode 1 format - a technically invalid format*, though many current drives
    happily read them, but many older ones will only read the first session.
    Fortunately XPs own burning facility uses the correct format (Mode 2 Form 1)

    Having said that, Nero is not imune from problems, and when they first
    supported DVDs, insisted on burning data DVDs in the CD filing system
    format. This didn't cause too much of a problem because DVD data drives
    didn't care - at least they didn't until dual layer disks came along. Many
    drives on seeing a CD format dual layer disk decided that they couldn't
    possibly be dual layer and wouldn't read them further. Producing a Video
    DVD by copying an otherwise valid file structure onto a blank disk produced
    a Video DVD that Video DVD players couldn't play, but data DVD drives could.

    Personally, I still do not like Nero, because it does not support packet
    incremental format writing to non rewriteable disks. Further it does not
    support adding subsequent sessions to multisession disks unless the previous
    sessions were all written using that copy of Nero and the session format was
    saved. Roxio on the other hand will happily import the previous sessions
    from the disk.

    *This was the intention of the Orange Book specification, but it was
    ambiguous on the point and many drive manufacturers interpreted it that
    multisession Mode 1 was valid. This is now the defacto standard if not the
    intent.
     
    M.I.5¾, May 9, 2006
    #11
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.