Dell is Sending Me a New Computer Comparible to What I Have Now

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Monica, Mar 3, 2009.

  1. Monica

    Monica Guest

    Changed the SATA Operations back to RAID...Windows couldn't load and had to
    change it back. This means my new FreeAgent drives have been degraded too,
    right?
    I installed XP SP3 earlier today with a MS SP cd that I ordered from
    Microsoft. Looked for a Dell XP SP3 cd on ebay but didn't find one.
    If someone knows where to find a Dell SATA driver for XP that will work on
    my 420, I would greatly appreciate it.
    Ben, I used the link S. Lewis sent and downloaded all the applicable drivers
    to a thumb drive. Installed them this morning. Is the SATA driver
    listed on that site not the Dell SATA drivers I need for a XP install on the
    420? The monitor driver didn't work. I think a monitor driver CD came with
    the Dim 8400. I'll locate that and see if it solves my problem.
    I have "?" marks, in Device Manager, for PCI Simple Communication Controller
    (haven't a clue), Video Controller (VGA compatible), and XPS Mini View (not
    important).
    Right now window and internet scrolling is choppy. View on monitor is
    crappy :(
     
    Monica, Mar 10, 2009
    #81
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  2. Monica

    Monica Guest

    Changed the SATA Operations back to RAID...Windows couldn't load and had to
    change it back. This means my new FreeAgent drives have been degraded too,
    right?
    I installed XP SP3 earlier today with a MS SP cd that I ordered from
    Microsoft. Looked for a Dell XP SP3 cd on ebay but didn't find one.
    If someone knows where to find a Dell SATA driver for XP that will work on
    my 420, I would greatly appreciate it.
    Ben, I used the link S. Lewis sent and downloaded all the applicable drivers
    to a thumb drive. Installed them this morning. Is the SATA driver
    listed on that site not the Dell SATA drivers I need for a XP install on the
    420? The monitor driver didn't work. I think a monitor driver CD came with
    the Dim 8400. I'll locate that and see if it solves my problem.
    I have "?" marks, in Device Manager, for PCI Simple Communication Controller
    (haven't a clue), Video Controller (VGA compatible), and XPS Mini View (not
    important).
    Right now window and internet scrolling is choppy. View on monitor is
    crappy :(
     
    Monica, Mar 10, 2009
    #82
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  3. Monica

    Monica Guest

    Didn't expect this! In fact, I thought this was the easy part. Just took
    out the 2 512mb and 2 1gb sticks of 240-pin DDR2 memory and replaced them
    with my 4 1gb (Crucial brand) 240-PIN DIMM 128Mx64 DDR2 PC2-4200. System
    beeped (long beeps) when I turned it on. Unplugged it and reseated the
    memory. Same thing.
    Should these have worked? The ones that came in the 420 are 240-pin, 128x64
    DDR2 as well.
    Monica
     
    Monica, Mar 10, 2009
    #83
  4. Monica

    Brian K Guest

    Stew and Ben,

    Out of interest I just did the reverse procedure. Transferred the OS from
    the Dell SATA 9150 to the IDE Gateway. No problems.

    All it needed to boot the WinXP OS was to change the HAL from halmacpi.dll
    to halacpi.dll using TBOSDT. The IDE script wasn't needed.
     
    Brian K, Mar 10, 2009
    #84
  5. Monica

    S.Lewis Guest


    For some reason I would think it would be easier to go "backwards" to PATA
    (which may or may not be true).

    And I would still expect the hal.dll to choke.

    This work you're doing in altering/swapping the hal is damned impressive.

    Not sure that I'm bright enough to pull that off unless the TeraByte utility
    is pretty intuitive.
     
    S.Lewis, Mar 10, 2009
    #85
  6. Monica

    Brian K Guest

    I'm not that bright either and I don't think TBOSDT is intuitive. I'm just
    copying lines from the scripts. For example, to change the HAL... (a:\ is
    the TBOSDT CD or USB flash drive. In this case it was a CD as the old
    Gateway didn't boot from USB)


    tbosdt
    mount 0: 0 0x01
    copy a:\halacpi.dll 0:\windows\system32\hal.dll
    umount 0:
     
    Brian K, Mar 10, 2009
    #86
  7. Monica

    Ben Myers Guest

    I'm having a brain cramp here, because I still do not understand
    perfectly how Windows XP manages its entire startup.

    The best I can figure from your posting is that the HAL gets customized
    and bound together with the motherboard chipset driver at the time when
    Windows is installed. Hence, when Windows starts up, it loads a HAL DLL
    with a motherboard chipset driver, and, if the driver and actual chipset
    do not match perfectly, BZZZZZZT, BSOD 0x0000007B. What the TBOSBT
    script would appear to do is simply break the binding between HAL and
    mobo chipset driver. If that is the case, what happens when you reboot
    the system after executing the lines above in the TBOSDT script above?

    If my description here is actually accurate, the system should ask for
    or look to install the motherboard chipset driver that matches the
    motherboard in the new Windows "environment" for the hard drive. Is
    this what happens? If not, I will still have a brain cramp.

    Anyone else with intimate knowledge of this somewhat OT topic, please
    feel free to chime in... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Mar 10, 2009
    #87
  8. Monica

    BillW50 Guest

    In Monica typed on Mon, 9 Mar 2009 21:10:25 -0600:
    This is on your new Dell XPS 420, right? As PC2-4200 isn't fast enough
    for that machine. As you need PC2-5300 type.

    --
    Bill
    2 Gateway MX6124 - Windows XP SP2
    3 Asus EEE PC 701G4 ~ 2GB RAM ~ 16GB-SDHC
    2 Asus EEE PC 702G8 ~ 1GB RAM ~ 16GB-SDHC
    Windows XP SP2 ~ Xandros Linux - Puppy - Ubuntu
     
    BillW50, Mar 10, 2009
    #88
  9. Monica

    Brian K Guest



    I wouldn't like to even start to explain how HAL works.



    I wanted to see a typical HAL error so from a command line, I changed the
    HAL in my multi-processor 9150 to a single processor HAL. I changed
    halmacpi.dll to halacpi.dll. I rebooted, the POST was normal, the Windows
    logo with the three scrolling blue dots appeared for 5 seconds and then
    there was a black screen and nothing more. No flashing cursor. Just a black
    screen. An image was restored to get back to Windows.



    In the Gateway, I restored an image of the 9150 OS. The boot sequence was
    similar to above. Rebooting and pressing F8 gets you to a menu where you can
    choose Safe Mode. All the drivers then load down to Mup.sys but it just sits
    on that screen thereafter.



    So I then changed the HAL to a single processor type and the computer did
    boot into Safe Mode, ran through a prolonged "Found New Hardware" sequence
    and was then able to boot normally into WinXP.



    Interesting. No BSOD so IDE controller drivers must have been correct. I
    didn't need to run the IDE script.



    When I did the first exercise, a few months ago, of transferring the OS from
    the Gateway to the Dell, there was a BSOD. Stop error 0x0000007B
    (unrecognized boot device). But strangely enough I didn't have to change
    the HAL. The 9150 ran OK with the wrong HAL even though it wouldn't boot in
    my above test. I just had to run the SATA driver script to get the 9150 to
    boot.



    I'd be interested to hear your experiences when you try this.
     
    Brian K, Mar 10, 2009
    #89
  10. Monica

    BillW50 Guest

    In Monica typed on Tue, 10 Mar 2009 14:31:39 -0600:
    Oh Happy Birthday Monica!

    As for Crucial, well in the land of customer service, they don't pay
    them usually very well. So you don't always attract the brightest bulbs
    in the world. :(

    Now this new hard drive you added, never had Windows installed on it
    yet, right? As Windows installed on another computer won't work unless
    the computers are using the same chipsets. And yes, you should be able
    to get the BIOS to see the SATA drives and the CD/DVD drives if you
    change the drives to legacy mode. The rest sounds fine to me.

    --
    Bill
    2 Gateway MX6124 - Windows XP SP2
    3 Asus EEE PC 701G4 ~ 2GB RAM ~ 16GB-SDHC
    2 Asus EEE PC 702G8 ~ 1GB RAM ~ 16GB-SDHC
    Windows XP SP2 ~ Xandros Linux - Puppy - Ubuntu
     
    BillW50, Mar 10, 2009
    #90
  11. Monica

    Monica Guest

    I called Crucial this morning to ask about the memory. At first he said it
    would work. Then I asked about the difference between
    the 4200 vs 5300 or 6400 that works with the 420. That's when he noticed
    the last four numbers and said "oops, it won't work".
    Just bought those 4 sticks last summer :( Won't bother ordering more for
    the 420 since XP can't use much more than that.

    Think I bit off more than I wanted to chew :eek: This has turned out to be a
    lot more trouble than it's probably going to be worth.
    (I'm sure someone told me that it would be! <g>)
    I know you guys are getting tired of helping, but please, just a while
    longer.
    I added an internal SATA drive. Found a diagram of the mobo and
    instructions on where to plug it in. Figured there would be
    some changes I needed to make to the BIOS? and I even looked there to see if
    I could figure out what to change. I couldn't. There are
    two CD/DVD driveds on this computer. They're on SATA 1 and 2. I had to
    move them to SATA 2 and 3, putting the other hdd on SATA 1.
    At this point, the computer doesn't see them in that configuration. I don't
    know where to make the necessary changes. Help?

    Monica...NOT the way she wants to be spending her birthday week!
     
    Monica, Mar 10, 2009
    #91
  12. Monica

    Ben Myers Guest

    I should say that a BSOD 0x0000007B has always given me a brain cramp.
    More appropriately, getting a system to boot without a 7B has given me a
    brain cramp.

    Now that I see the TBOSDT script you used, my brain is less cramped. It
    looks to me like a very simple replacement of the customized HAL with
    the generic original one from a Windows install CD. Once the
    replacement is done and the system rebooted, did Windows then complain
    the the motherboard chipset drivers were not installed? If so, then my
    brain cramp diminishes considerably, replaced by the famous Eureka, I've
    got it!

    .... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Mar 11, 2009
    #92
  13. Monica

    Brian K Guest

    .. It looks to me like a very simple replacement of the customized HAL with
    If you look at your WinXP HAL.DLL in C:\windows\system32 and right click,
    Properties, Version tab, Internal Name. It will likely be halmacpi.dll. If
    you convert this to a single processor HAL, the file will still be called
    HAL.DLL although of a different size and the Internal Name will be
    halacpi.dll. Simple isn't it?

    After booting to Safe Mode, Windows didn't complain about anything. It just
    Found New Hardware, just about everything in Device Manager and requested a
    reboot. I wasn't asked to manually install any drivers. It was painless. If
    I had been transferring an OS from a single processor computer to a single
    processor computer or a multi processor computer to a multi processor
    computer, a HAL change would not have been needed. Typically, the TBOSDT
    scripts are just for installing controller drivers, IDE or SATA, so your
    computer can boot. My experience with this is limited but I would expect
    that chipset drivers, video, sound etc are needed after Windows has booted.
    Just as they are needed after a Windows install. As the lifespan of my
    transferred OS was only going to be 5 minutes, I didn't bother installing
    further drivers.




    From the TBOSDT PDF for the IDE script..........

    "This example covers on a situation where an existing image of Windows XP
    needs to be restored and booted from a target system with a different IDE
    controller for the boot drive. The IDE driver required for the new
    controller is included with Windows, but is not installed in the backup
    image. An example of this would be if the motherboard failed on a system,
    and the replacement motherboard used a different IDE controller. Since the
    driver required for the new controller is not installed in the existing
    backup image, restoring the image and attempting to boot will result in a
    blue screen and Stop error 0x0000007B (unrecognized boot device). "
     
    Brian K, Mar 11, 2009
    #93
  14. Monica

    Brian K Guest

    From the PDF for SATA...

    "This example covers a situation similar to example 1 above, except that the
    driver required for the new mass storage controller is not included with
    Windows. The starting point for this example is that an existing image has
    been restored to the target partition, but attempting to boot from the
    restored partition results in a blue screen (unrecognized boot device), or
    the system automatically reboots shortly after the Windows logo is shown. In
    this case, the vendor-supplied driver required can be installed in a
    two-stage process requiring 2 TBOSDT scripts. The first stage (Stage 1) is
    needed to install the driver and make the partition bootable. It's also used
    to automate running of the second stage script. The second stage (Stage 2)
    is required to automate the completion of the driver installation once
    Windows has booted."
     
    Brian K, Mar 11, 2009
    #94
  15. Monica

    Brian K Guest



    Monica,

    I hope I haven't misled you about the SATA drivers. One of the XPS 420
    owners should know if they are correct.

    If you can't get SATA AHCI working, I'd start again. Delete the WinXP
    partition. Choose SATA AHCI (or whatever the correct AHCI is for your
    computer) in the BIOS. Boot from the WinXP CD and load SATA drivers from a
    floppy by pressing F6. You have all the other drivers now so it shouldn't
    take too much time.
     
    Brian K, Mar 11, 2009
    #95
  16. Monica

    Monica Guest

    These drivers say they're for Vostro 420. Are they applicable for the XPS
    420 too? I ran the Matrix Storage Manager. If that's the one that is
    supposed to let me choose Raid On instead of RAID Autodetect/ATA in SATA
    operations in the BIOS without
    the BSOD 0x0000007B (I think) error, it didn't work.
    You know, I'm not even sure what those two choices mean unless one is ATA
    and the other is S-ATA. All I know
    is S-ATA is faster. All 4 of my hdds (two internal and two external are
    SATAs and that's how I'd like for them to run.

    Tom, this computer has floppy drive (I know, I couldn't believe it either).
    I've put the Intel Matrix Storage Manager (OS Pre-Install Driver Only)
    on it. Is this the driver that is suppose to let me change back to RAID On
    in the BIOS? Is the "Raid On" option what I need for my SATA devices to
    run like they should? Am I SO far off in left field it's pathetic? Feels
    like it :( At this point, if I had to reinstall an OS, I think I'd
    reinstall Vista.
    Internet browsing is slower, window scrolling is choppy, monitor is subpar.
     
    Monica, Mar 11, 2009
    #96
  17. Monica

    WSZsr Guest

    Monica, Brian is correct. You need to start over as Brian explains. Make
    sure the AHCI drivers on the floppy are expanded and not just a single file
    on the floppy.
    Use F12 to boot from the XP CD. F6 to load the SATA drivers. Then delete
    the XP partition, create a new partition, format, and install XP.

    Then install drivers in this order:
    Chipset
    Graphics (video card not the monitor)
    Sound
    NIC
    Monitor

    You are confusing the graphics driver with the monitor driver. They are two
    separate drivers. The graphics driver is the important one.
     
    WSZsr, Mar 11, 2009
    #97
  18. Monica

    S.Lewis Guest



    I dunno, guys. Brian, your demonstration is certainly credible but - if I
    understand correctly - your conclusion may or may not be, if it is centered
    around single/multi-core processors and/or SATA/IDE-PATA drives. Straighten
    me out if misunderstand.

    Again, I'm not questioning at all what you have gotten to work in your
    specific situation(s), which is impressive enough.

    But what I cannot wrap my brain around is why the HAL sometimes will not
    embrace seemingly MINOR hardware configuration changes. More specifically,
    I had opportunity recently to move around a Windows XP Home hard disk
    between Dimension 4400, 4500 and 4550 platforms.

    The short story is that these three platforms are nearly identical in
    chipset spec, are all single core, and have PATA/IDE bus commonality.
    Obviously, USB2.0 comes into play on the newer models along with a 533MHz vs
    400MHz FSB, but beyond that (so far as I know) they are very similar.

    Yet, with a disk with a clean install I can generally say that I could not
    randomly move the disk around as it would - you guessed it - BSOD/STOP just
    at or after the Windows splash and reboot. I'm not positive it was a 7B
    error, but there were no other external devices attached to the system.
    Further, I couldn't even get to desktop in safe mode.

    So.....I'm not really sure how that fits into your experiment. In any
    event, I'm copying these notes for further education/tests and future use.

    Thanks -

    Stewart
     
    S.Lewis, Mar 11, 2009
    #98
  19. Monica

    Ben Myers Guest

    I studied the TBOSDT documentation and scripts last night as well as the
    Microsoft IgnoranceBase article on STOP 0x0000007B. Here is what I
    finally figured out:

    If the Windows registry has all the registry entries required for a
    specific motherboard chipset and the SYSTEM32 or SYSTEM32\DRIVERS has
    all the necessary files needed to make it go, you've got a good chance
    that the system will boot without a 7B. So if you can manage to squirt
    the required entries into the registry and put the files in place, you
    can probably boot the system successfully. For all practical purposes,
    that is what TBOSDT and its underlying software help you to do.

    One could also use the Ultimate Boot Disk to get the files in the right
    place, but putting entries into the registry when a hard drive is
    offline is no mean feat. Hence TBOSDT.

    It is also not easy to get your hands on the files needed by a
    motherboard chipset. You can extract them from the Windows CD if they
    exist there. You can also copy them from the I386 folder. But if you
    have a chipset unknown to your version of Windows (e.g. Intel 865/875
    for XP SP2, Intel 945 for XP SP3), you have to figure out some way to
    get the files which are normally inside a manufacturer- (e.g. Intel) or
    vendor-supplied (e.g. Dell) executable, which needs to be opened up and
    the files extracted.

    This is all beginning to sound like a serious project for people who do
    one-off motherboard replacements where the chipsets are different.
    People who need to do 50 motherboard replacements all the same type
    might want to do this.

    My brain cramp about STOP 0x0000007B just returned... Ben
     
    Ben Myers, Mar 11, 2009
    #99
  20. Monica

    S.Lewis Guest



    Yep. Versus simply copying off needed files/data and wiping/clean
    re-installing the OS, I can't see that I would need often - perhaps never,
    but I'm fascinated with the practice/concept.

    And since I'm almost exclusively dealing with individual systems rather than
    a large install base......
     
    S.Lewis, Mar 11, 2009
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