DFI K6bv3+: maximum cacheable memory?

Discussion in 'FIC' started by pigdos, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. pigdos

    pigdos Guest

    I have a DFI k6bv3+ w/2MB L2 cache. I'm figuring that if the VA503+ can
    cache 256MB w/1MB of L2 cache the k6bv3+ can probably cache 512MB w/2MB of
    L2 cache? The tag RAM size would be the determining factor here right? I'm
    assuming write-through mode for the L2 cache.
     
    pigdos, Jul 7, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Yes, that is correct for the MVP3/MVP4. If you were using write-back
    mode for the L2 cache, that would limit you to 1/2 the cacheable RAM, so
    that would be 256 MB with 2 MB L2 cache. For write-through, a 2 MB L2
    cache would give you 512 MB cacheable RAM.
     
    Alex Zorrilla, Jul 7, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. pigdos

    farmuse Guest

    I was under the impression that it was more dependent on the CPU used
    than any BIOS setting. The K6-2 can cache 256, where as the K 6 III line
    can cache much more than that. I doubt if either board would be able to
    use 512 MB modules, so 512 total would be the max with a K 6 III.
     
    farmuse, Jul 8, 2006
    #3
  4. pigdos

    pigdos Guest

    We're not talking about the on-board cache on the CPU we're talking about
    the motherboard cache, which could be L2 (if you had a K6, Pentium, K62 or
    Cyrix CPU) or L3 (if you had a K62+ or K63+).
     
    pigdos, Jul 9, 2006
    #4
  5. it is dependent on the cpu not the size of the L2
     
    John and Karen, Jul 16, 2006
    #5
  6. In the case of the K6-2, K6, Pentium MMX, Cyrix M-II, and other similar
    processors, it is quite dependent on the amount of the L2 cache on the
    motherboard. These CPUs do not have their own L2 cache, so the chipsets
    designed to run them (e.g., Intel 430TX, VIA MVP3, SiS 5597/5598) make
    use of the tag RAM on the motherboard's L2 cache to determine the amount
    of cacheable system RAM. The actual amount of cacheable RAM depends on
    the chipset, the amount of tag RAM available in the L2, and certain BIOS
    settings.

    Now, when the L2 was moved to the CPU (Pentium Pro, Pentium II, K6-III,
    Athlon), the amount of tag RAM still makes a difference, but now it
    becomes a function of the CPU in question, as opposed to the motherboard.
     
    Alex Zorrilla, Jul 17, 2006
    #6
  7. I know all that, but for the K6 2 vs K6 III is makes a difference.
     
    John and Karen, Jul 18, 2006
    #7
  8. Ahhh, OK. Now I see what you mean. Agreed.

     
    Alex Zorrilla, Jul 19, 2006
    #8
  9. pigdos

    pigdos Guest

    And you're still wrong because it STILL makes a difference in how much RAM
    the motherboard cache can handle REGARDLESS of the type of CPU you have
    installed.
     
    pigdos, Jul 26, 2006
    #9
  10. pigdos

    farmuse Guest

    I know the FIC 503+ can cache more ram with the K6 III than it can
    with the K6-2. there are many instances where this is true, where what
    CPU you use makes a difference. There are some P II that can cache a lot
    less than other P II that run at the same speed. Believe it or not.
    Because the L2 cache is on the K6 III chip itself then it is a different
    configuration than with the K6-2.
     
    farmuse, Jul 27, 2006
    #10
  11. pigdos

    pigdos Guest

    You really don't know much about cache architecture do you? The cache
    implemented on the FIC VA503+ or K6bv3+ is entirely independent of the CPU
    used. If you have L2 cache on the CPU, the on-board motherboard cache
    becomes L3. The CPU used DOESN'T make a difference at ALL in the amount of
    cacheable memory w.r.t. the motherboard cache. The tag RAM (and how it's
    configured [write-through or write-back]) and cache size on the motherboard
    are the ONLY determining factors in how much memory is cacheable on the FIC
    VA503+ or DFI K6bv3.
     
    pigdos, Jul 28, 2006
    #11
  12. two words, bull shit. You are clueless. It is well documented the K6
    III can cache more ram than a K6-2, ask anyone on this newsgroup. I have
    been building computers for nine years, and have used many FIC
    motherboards. So you just go on and believe what you want. I mean why did
    you come here in the first place ?


     
    John and Karen, Jul 30, 2006
    #12
  13. scroll down and see that the K6 III can cache 4 GB total ram. You did
    not state what CPU you plan on using. You might be right, with 2 MB
    external L2 cache on the motherboard the total ram that can be cached
    might go up to 512 MB or maybe even 768, when using a K6-2. With the K6
    III of any flavor, I know it can use all 768 when using the DFI board you
    have.

    http://www.sandpile.org/impl/k6.htm


     
    John and Karen, Jul 30, 2006
    #13
  14. pigdos

    pigdos Guest

    Do you know what motherboard cache is? Do you realize it has nothing to do
    w/the CPU installed? I don't care if you've been installing computers for
    nine years
    or 20 years (I've been working with computers since 1987, I've worked on the
    original IBM PC). It's obvious you don't understand the difference between
    cache built into a motherboard (which was common 10 years ago) and that
    which resides in the CPU. I was never asking about how much RAM the CPU can
    cache.

    --
    Doug
     
    pigdos, Jul 31, 2006
    #14
  15. pigdos

    pigdos Guest

    Once again you have the right answer to the WRONG question. You really don't
    have a clue do you? Are you even an A+?

    --
    Doug
     
    pigdos, Jul 31, 2006
    #15
  16. pigdos

    John Guest

    gimme a break Doug. Really. So the 503+ and the DFI have cache on the
    motherboard ? no way, really ?

    dude, you asked what was the maximum ram that could be cached, and I
    gave you an answer. not only does it depend on the motherboard, but it
    also depends on the cpu used. Right ? you have to admit that it does. I
    admit it depends on the motherboard, now you admit it depends on the cpu
    as well.

    no I am not A fcking plus, I am self taught. I have used many many many
    super 7 boards, and have built literally hundreds of computers from the
    PA-2007 up to NF7-S and P 4 machines. I prefer older computers simply
    because they work well and are now almost free, thus my experience with
    FIC, DFI, Tyan, etc.

    peace, John
     
    John, Jul 31, 2006
    #16
  17. pigdos

    Kyle Guest

    | Do you know what motherboard cache is?
    | Do you realize it has nothing to do w/the CPU installed?

    Much too simply stated to be absolutely accurate information.

    This web page:
    http://www3pub.amd.com/products/cpg/k6iii/trilevel.html
    explains how the CPU onboard cache can have a major impact on system
    performance, even when a traditional mobo L2 cache is present.

    | I don't care if you've been installing computers for
    | nine years
    | or 20 years (I've been working with computers since 1987, I've
    worked on the
    | original IBM PC).

    Using a CPU such as a k6III or a k62+/3+ CPU makes a world of
    difference, particularly since the onboard cache of these CPUs runs at
    full CPU speed, rather than at FSB speed, and will cache the entire
    addressable memory space of the processor. The motherboard L2 cache
    becomes relegated to an "L3" role with these CPUs, and becomes much
    less important to overall performance due to its slower speed.

    | It's obvious you don't understand the difference between
    | cache built into a motherboard (which was common 10 years ago) and
    that
    | which resides in the CPU. I was never asking about how much RAM the
    CPU can
    | cache.
    |

    Now, if one installs more ram than the original mobo design will
    cache, certain CPUs will still cache the "uncached" memory space not
    cached by the mobo cache. I don't really understand all this
    squabble.

    It is well documented that once cache size exceeds 512k, only marginal
    performance gains will be realized in overall memory performance
    (typical usage), even when more sophisticated 4-way associative logic
    is implemented. The tag ram limitations of the MVP3 chipset are
    another issue well suited for a separate google search (a little
    usenet searching will reveal all of the great posts on this subject,
    particularly how the mvp3 chipset designs typically do not cache all
    of 256 meg of memory in write-thru mode due to the 10 bit tag-ram
    implementation).
     
    Kyle, Aug 14, 2006
    #17
  18. pigdos

    pigdos Guest

    This post has nothing to do w/performance whatsoever. Did you read the topic
    subject? Reading comprehension counts.

    The address space cached by the on-board motherboard cache has NOTHING to do
    w/the CPU. Absolutely nothing. I don't care WHICH socket 7 CPU you install,
    it will NOT affect the address space cached by the on-board motherboard
    cache. I'm willing to bet $100.00 that regardless of which CPU is installed
    Ray Van Tassle's Cachechk will still indicate the same address space as
    being cached by the same motherboard cache (regardless of whether or not it
    is L2 or L3) in the same mode (i.e. writethrough or writeback).

    Obviously, the glue logic between the on-board motherboard cache and the CPU
    has to be there, so yes, obviously it has something to do w/the CPU
    installed, but only in the sense that the CPU must conform to the socket 7
    specifications.

    I originally asked the above question (see the post subject) and this a$$hat
    began spouting off how much memory a CPU could cache.
     
    pigdos, Sep 21, 2006
    #18
  19. pigdos

    pigdos Guest

    And your answer is "much too simply stated to be absolutely accurate
    information". Ever heard of the principle of locality? Are you telling me
    that I'll see no difference between 2MB of on-board motherboard cache vs.
    512KB? The DFI K6bv3+ has 2MB of motherboard cache running at 100Mhz. The
    fact that it can cache more address space than 512KB would also make a
    difference if I planned to use more memory right?
     
    pigdos, Sep 21, 2006
    #19
  20. pigdos

    Roger Hunt Guest

    How do I get Cache Check to see all 1024MB of my system RAM?
     
    Roger Hunt, Sep 21, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.