Disk space and swap space (10.3.3)

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Wes Groleau, Apr 4, 2004.

  1. Wes Groleau

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Does 'df -k' have some magic that keeps it from
    counting swapfiles? I sometimes get GUI alerts
    warning me that I am dangerously low on disk space
    when 'df' says there is 100-500 megabytes. Sometimes
    it even says "you better quit some applications fast!"
    (paraphrase)

    But often, that does NOT happen with the same space showing.
    And note that both (warnings and no warnings) happen on
    both ends of the 100-500 MB free scale.

    Also, is there something out there somewhere that can
    detect a sudden _major_ change in free space and pop up
    an alert on _which_ directory and/or file changed?

    I have on three occasions noticed a sudden reduction of
    200-300 MB freespace with nothing (AFAICT) in the user's
    actions to explain it.

    I recently upgraded to 10.3.3 I cannot remember whether
    the first occurrence of these was before or after the upgrade.
     
    Wes Groleau, Apr 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. Wes Groleau

    matt neuburg Guest

    Well, that *is* dangerously low on disk space. In Panther, each swapfile
    is larger than the previous one, so if you've got a couple of swapfiles
    already, the next one would be too large for that space.

    The fact that you are *ever* seeing these warnings means you need to
    free up some space, NOW. You are working with too little space on your
    main partition, and are heading for trouble. Either that, or restart
    more often (to get rid of the extra swapfiles). I guess I should mention
    that MemoryStick can help you keep track of this situation... m.
     
    matt neuburg, Apr 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. Wes Groleau

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Ah, that makes sense. On the other hand, sometimes
    these occur after reboot even before anyone has logged in.

    I have lots of space on NFS--can Darwin cope with remote-mounted
    swap files? I am little by little moving things to the remote dirs
    but I want to test each time. I also don't want to move any of
    the OS X bundled stuff, because I've seen software update choke
    on things that weren't in the "expected" place.
    I tried memorystick, but decided it took up more screen space
    than it was worth. Although most of my 'work' is GUI, I almost
    always have a Terminal open for the occasional CLI task. So
    it's no problem to run 'df' or 'vm' when the whim hits.

    --
    Wes Groleau
    -----------

    "Thinking I'm dumb gives people something to
    feel smug about. Why should I disillusion them?"
    -- Charles Wallace
    (in _A_Wrinkle_In_Time_)
     
    Wes Groleau, Apr 4, 2004
    #3
  4. Wes Groleau

    Guest Guest

    I tried memorystick, but decided it took up more screen space
    than it was worth. Although most of my 'work' is GUI, I almost
    always have a Terminal open for the occasional CLI task. So
    it's no problem to run 'df' or 'vm' when the whim hits.[/QUOTE]

    A good alternative is called DiskSpace, which is something like
    donationware. Get it from www.mysterysoftware.com. It installs a menu
    which shows disk space remaining on all drives, with a user-selected
    drive displayed in the menu bar. I keep my downloading partition
    displayed there (currently 10.8 GB). The utility updates far better than
    the finder, and you don't have to rely upon your "whim" hitting in time.

    George
     
    Guest, Apr 4, 2004
    #4
  5. Wes Groleau

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Sounds like a nice tool. Although my menu bar is
    quite full, I think I'll go for it.

    I found the problem, though. Wrote a command to
    search for anything over a Megabyte and list them
    largest first. There was a logfile over 700 Meg
    in size with ALL of the lines dated April First.
    Except one, which was hundreds of instances of
    the filename separated by colons :)) !

    Is this an April Fool's joke from the system? :)

    Anyway, I'll be watching that directory for a recurrence.

    It was /Library/Logs/Console/cgroleau/ipfw.log, and the
    weirdest part is that the owner/group was cgroleau/admin
    but cgroleau is NOT a member of group admin.

    On top of that, each user has a console.log in a similar
    directory which looks like an echo of /var/log/system.log
    but only covering the times that user is logged in.

    These logs were NOT in the rotation/compression code
    in the periodic scripts, so they would have continued
    to grow unchecked. (I added them, though.)

    Now I need to write some sort of watchdog to notify
    me whenever something huge suddenly appears. Unless
    someone knows of something already out there.
     
    Wes Groleau, Apr 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Wes Groleau

    matt neuburg Guest

    Well, I think George Nospam just told you. If what you want to know is
    when the amount of free space on your hard drive suddenly drops, that's
    a good way.

    A superb program for answering the question "What's occupying the space
    on my hard drive?" is Disk Inventory X. Or you could use Disk Surveyor;
    it's Classic only but it works fine. m.
     
    matt neuburg, Apr 4, 2004
    #6
  7. Wes Groleau

    Wes Groleau Guest

    What I meant was something (not necessarily real-time)
    that could say "Dir xyz just added 400 Meg" or
    "300 Meg file abc recently created" As opposed to just
    doing a scan for large files/dirs. Of course, I could
    do what I did earlier every night and compare.
     
    Wes Groleau, Apr 5, 2004
    #7
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