Does grounding a PC lead to less power usage ?

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Skybuck Flying, May 15, 2011.

  1. Hello,

    Question:

    Does grounding a PC lead to less power usage ?

    (If it's not grounded than 120 volts placed on pc chasis so they say.)

    Will this 120 volts placed on pc chasis lead to higher energy bills ?

    They say the ampere/flow of electricity is low because of condensators or
    something... but is this really the case ?

    Do the power supplies perhaps have some switching electronics which will
    make their work more efficiently when they
    "detect" (?) grounding wire ?

    Or is there no detection involved/no switching ciruits and is 120 volts plus
    ampere simply send directly to ground wire ?!

    To me this seems a bit strange but ok...

    What would happen in a tower like "The World Trade Center" if it was stocked
    with pc's everywhere... perhaps such a large building would have special
    things... so how about a large appartment complex ?!?

    Weird.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
    Skybuck Flying, May 15, 2011
    #1
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  2. Skybuck Flying

    Wimpie Guest

    Hello,

    When you touch the chassis and connect yourself to ground, there will
    be some small heating effect in your body (and you will also
    experience it as unpleasant). So see it just as a thought, not
    something that you should actually do.

    So theoretically spoken there can be some additional dissipation
    because of Y-capacitor leakage through dissipating materials. However
    when you look to the numbers, it will be negligible.

    As that ground wire is essential for the safety of the equipment, the
    equipment's plug should be plugged into a socket with safety ground
    only.


    Wim
    PA3DJS
    www.tetech.nl
    Instruct your racing pigeons to remove abc from the address.
     
    Wimpie, May 15, 2011
    #2
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  3. Skybuck Flying

    upsidedown Guest

    A pure inductive/capacitive reactance across the line voltage does not
    dissipate power by definition.

    Of course the capacitive reactance will add some reactive current to
    the line and hence cause some heat dissipation in copper series
    resistance.

    Since these filter capacitors are allowed to conduct only a few mA of
    current (for safety reasons), the copper losses are nearly
    unmeasurable compared to several amps load current in the same leads.
     
    upsidedown, May 15, 2011
    #3
  4. Skybuck Flying

    Robert Baer Guest

    You need an extra shovel-full of dirt for a good ground.
    Adding a little water afterwards also is of benefit.
    If you add too much water, then just jump into the pool.
     
    Robert Baer, May 16, 2011
    #4
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