DRM-Free Music on the iTunes Store

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Michelle Steiner, Apr 2, 2007.

  1. Step 1 in getting rid of protected media.

    <http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2007/04/02itunes.html?sr=hotnews.rss>

    CUPERTINO, California‹April 2, 2007‹Apple® today announced that EMI
    Music¹s entire digital catalog of music will be available for purchase
    DRM-free (without digital rights management) from the iTunes® Store
    (www.itunes.com) worldwide in May. DRM-free tracks from EMI will be
    offered at higher quality 256 kbps AAC encoding, resulting in audio
    quality indistinguishable from the original recording, for just $1.29
    per song. In addition, iTunes customers will be able to easily upgrade
    their entire library of all previously purchased EMI content to the
    higher quality DRM-free versions for just 30 cents a song. iTunes will
    continue to offer its entire catalog, currently over five million songs,
    in the same versions as today‹128 kbps AAC encoding with DRM‹at the same
    price of 99 cents per song, alongside DRM-free higher quality versions
    when available.

    ³We are going to give iTunes customers a choice‹the current versions of
    our songs for the same 99 cent price, or new DRM-free versions of the
    same songs with even higher audio quality and the security of
    interoperability for just 30 cents more,² said Steve Jobs, Apple¹s CEO.
    ³We think our customers are going to love this, and we expect to offer
    more than half of the songs on iTunes in DRM-free versions by the end of
    this year.²

    ³EMI and iTunes are once again teaming up to move the digital music
    industry forward by giving music fans higher quality audio that is
    virtually indistinguishable from the original recordings, with no usage
    restrictions on the music they love from their favorite artists,² said
    Eric Nicoli, CEO of EMI Group.

    With DRM-free music from the EMI catalog, iTunes customers will have the
    ability to download tracks from their favorite EMI artists without any
    usage restrictions that limit the types of devices or number of
    computers that purchased songs can be played on. DRM-free songs
    purchased from the iTunes Store will be encoded in AAC at 256 kbps,
    twice the current bit rate of 128 kbps, and will play on all iPods, Mac®
    or Windows computers, Apple TVs and soon iPhones, as well as many other
    digital music players.

    iTunes will also offer customers a simple, one-click option to easily
    upgrade their entire library of all previously purchased EMI content to
    the higher quality DRM-free format for 30 cents a song. All EMI music
    videos will also be available in DRM-free format with no change in
    price.CUPERTINO, California‹April 2, 2007‹Apple® today announced that
    EMI Music¹s entire digital catalog of music will be available for
    purchase DRM-free (without digital rights management) from the iTunes®
    Store (www.itunes.com) worldwide in May. DRM-free tracks from EMI will
    be offered at higher quality 256 kbps AAC encoding, resulting in audio
    quality indistinguishable from the original recording, for just $1.29
    per song. In addition, iTunes customers will be able to easily upgrade
    their entire library of all previously purchased EMI content to the
    higher quality DRM-free versions for just 30 cents a song. iTunes will
    continue to offer its entire catalog, currently over five million songs,
    in the same versions as today‹128 kbps AAC encoding with DRM‹at the same
    price of 99 cents per song, alongside DRM-free higher quality versions
    when available.

    ³We are going to give iTunes customers a choice‹the current versions of
    our songs for the same 99 cent price, or new DRM-free versions of the
    same songs with even higher audio quality and the security of
    interoperability for just 30 cents more,² said Steve Jobs, Apple¹s CEO.
    ³We think our customers are going to love this, and we expect to offer
    more than half of the songs on iTunes in DRM-free versions by the end of
    this year.²

    ³EMI and iTunes are once again teaming up to move the digital music
    industry forward by giving music fans higher quality audio that is
    virtually indistinguishable from the original recordings, with no usage
    restrictions on the music they love from their favorite artists,² said
    Eric Nicoli, CEO of EMI Group.

    With DRM-free music from the EMI catalog, iTunes customers will have the
    ability to download tracks from their favorite EMI artists without any
    usage restrictions that limit the types of devices or number of
    computers that purchased songs can be played on. DRM-free songs
    purchased from the iTunes Store will be encoded in AAC at 256 kbps,
    twice the current bit rate of 128 kbps, and will play on all iPods, Mac®
    or Windows computers, Apple TVs and soon iPhones, as well as many other
    digital music players.

    iTunes will also offer customers a simple, one-click option to easily
    upgrade their entire library of all previously purchased EMI content to
    the higher quality DRM-free format for 30 cents a song. All EMI music
    videos will also be available in DRM-free format with no change in price.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Apr 2, 2007
    #1
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  2. Michelle Steiner

    Hans Aberg Guest

    Hans Aberg, Apr 2, 2007
    #2
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  3. Michelle Steiner

    Hans Aberg Guest

    It is a big hurdle, not only for end users, but also for implementors of
    software. I have just discovered (and reported) a bug whereby the OS,
    under certain circumstances, does not recognize the correct region of the
    DVD drive, and asks to reset it. Suppose one would follow that advice: it
    would quickly render your DVD-drive useless in view of that one is only
    allowed a total of four resettings.

    Hans Aberg
     
    Hans Aberg, Apr 2, 2007
    #3
  4. Michelle Steiner

    Jon Guest

    As a Norwegian, I can only surmise that the pressure initiated by the
    Norwegian and other European consumer ombudsmen helped achieve this now.
    I feel certain it wouldd have happened sooner or later anyway, though.
     
    Jon, Apr 2, 2007
    #4
  5. As a Norwegian, I can only surmise that the pressure initiated by the
    Norwegian and other European consumer ombudsmen helped achieve this
    now.[/QUOTE]

    I don't know about that. Apple never wanted DRM in iTunes, but the
    recording labels required it as a condition of having their stuff there.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Apr 2, 2007
    #5
  6. What is the quality of the eMusic stuff?
     
    Michelle Steiner, Apr 2, 2007
    #6
  7. Except, apparently, for the Beatles' material.[/QUOTE]

    Is the Beatles' material available through EMI? If it is, how do you
    know that it won't be available on iTunes in May?
     
    Michelle Steiner, Apr 2, 2007
    #7
  8. Michelle Steiner

    Hans Aberg Guest

    As a Norwegian, I can only surmise that the pressure initiated by the
    Norwegian and other European consumer ombudsmen helped achieve this
    now.[/QUOTE]

    I doubt it. I think it was said somewhere the electronic music sales
    weren't as good as hoped. In addition, even if folks have an iPod, that
    may not be the only one, and then the protected stuff cannot be used. So
    it is not a benefit to Apple either - just giving their programmers extra
    work, in a world when software is becoming really complicated. So it is
    forced by a changing market. Those that move with it, will make money.

    Hans Aberg
     
    Hans Aberg, Apr 2, 2007
    #8
  9. Michelle Steiner

    Hans Aberg Guest

    Because EMI said so.

    <http://apnews.myway.com/article/20070402/D8O8H0EG0.html>[/QUOTE]

    This is not too surprising. The use of DRM builds on the unsupported
    belief that without it, everyone will just copy instead of buying (even
    though it is easy to remove by those that want to do just that). So when
    moving away from DRM, one will first try things that are not so sensitive
    if something might go wrong. For example, some artists can make a lot of
    money on performances or playing in payed media, so for those, it may not
    be a catastrophe if music track sales drop. Beatles is not in that
    category.

    Hans Aberg
     
    Hans Aberg, Apr 2, 2007
    #9
  10. Michelle Steiner

    Hans Aberg Guest

    So you didn't read or understand what I wrote then?

    Hans Aberg
     
    Hans Aberg, Apr 2, 2007
    #10
  11. and too good to be true

    http://www.danaquarium.com/article.php?story=20070403042559247[/QUOTE]

    Apple said in the announcement that there would be a 30-cent price
    increase.

    And since it's sampled at 256kbps, of course the file is larger and will
    take longer to download. Yeah, you could call it "less efficient" if
    you don't know what you're talking about or deliberately trying to be
    negative, but the fact is that it results in higher-quality music.

    So it is true, and it's not "too good to be true".

    Keppelmeyer's attempt at a hatchet job is absolutely moronic.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Apr 3, 2007
    #11
  12. Michelle Steiner, Apr 3, 2007
    #12
  13. Michelle Steiner

    Ian Gregory Guest

    Apple said in the announcement that there would be a 30-cent price
    increase.

    And since it's sampled at 256kbps, of course the file is larger and will
    take longer to download. Yeah, you could call it "less efficient" if
    you don't know what you're talking about or deliberately trying to be
    negative, but the fact is that it results in higher-quality music.

    So it is true, and it's not "too good to be true".

    Keppelmeyer's attempt at a hatchet job is absolutely moronic.[/QUOTE]

    Indeed! Why would anyone even post the above URL without
    mentioning that it is a load of bollox?

    Here is John Gruber's take on the announcement:

    http://daringfireball.net/2007/04/emi_drm_free_music

    Ian
     
    Ian Gregory, Apr 3, 2007
    #13
  14. Michelle Steiner

    Guest Guest

    the beatles music is not available *at all*, drm or no drm.

    when it does become available (no date given), it will no doubt be
    drm-free, just like everything else emi offers.
     
    Guest, Apr 3, 2007
    #14
  15. Michelle Steiner

    Hans Aberg Guest

    Since 1984, based on some facts in the Apple Developer "State of the
    Union" video, hard disk space has doubled every year. Another source said
    that an iPod will in five years be able to hold the entire years
    production of music, and i another five years, the entire production of
    all times, that is, in compressed format. For uncompressed music, if the
    hard disk development holds up, add perhaps another three years.

    So this gives the prediction that in less than twenty years, and iPod will
    be able to hold all music produced in all of times in uncompressed format.

    The doubled size is about one year of hardware development. And it is
    probably time soon to sell uncompressed files online.

    Hans Aberg
     
    Hans Aberg, Apr 3, 2007
    #15
  16. Michelle Steiner

    Warren Oates Guest

    Sounds like something out of Stargate, they find a Mac Pro at the end of
    time that holds all the knowledge of the universe, but they've lost the
    master password and Teal'c won't let them use the pirated install disks
    they got found in the Ancient's temple so everyone is still shit out of
    luck.
     
    Warren Oates, Apr 3, 2007
    #16
  17. Michelle Steiner

    Hans Aberg Guest

    It will only hold up if one is able to double the hard disk space every
    year. In the case of RAM, which (based on track record) doubles every
    second year (for CPU speed it is every third year), one has the science to
    keep it up for at least of couple of decades. So it does not seem wholly
    unreasonable.

    Interestingly, SF movies seem to have stuff like (human) teleportation and
    faster than light travel, not within the realm or even contradicted by
    modern science, but cannot predict things like spaceship computer
    controlled autopilot ("Forbidden planet") and flat screen monitors ("Total
    recall").

    Hans Aberg
     
    Hans Aberg, Apr 3, 2007
    #17
  18. Michelle Steiner

    M. Guest

    English singer/songwriter Billy Bragg recently spoke (during one of his
    legendary extended rants) about the film version of "Fahrenheit 451" which
    just got another re-run on TV at that time.

    The funny thing is that the film makers were visionary enough to predict the
    way how modern TV works - there are flat screen TV monitors on the wall and
    they constantly show a kind of "real world" soap where the audience at home
    *interacts* with the show.

    However, when the phone rings, the actor crosses the room to the TV just to
    turn down the *volume*...

    So they predicted the way how TV shows work today, they predicted they way
    how TV devices look like today, but they couldn't think about something as
    obvious as wireless remote controls... ;-)
     
    M., Apr 3, 2007
    #18
  19. Michelle Steiner

    Hans Aberg Guest

    Or mobile telephones. When the telephone was new, somebody realizing its
    potential said: "In the future, every city will have one"... :)

    Hans Aberg
     
    Hans Aberg, Apr 3, 2007
    #19
  20. Michelle Steiner

    Dave Allen Guest

    The remote had obviously slipped down the crack between the couch
    cushions.
     
    Dave Allen, Apr 3, 2007
    #20
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