Dual Processor Scenarios

Discussion in 'Dell' started by HarryKrause, Jul 24, 2005.

  1. HarryKrause

    HarryKrause Guest

    So, what combinations of programs will benefit from a Dual Processor setup?

    E.G.

    Photoshop and Word? Yes, No?

    Spreadsheet Compilations and Photo printing?

    What?

    Are there particular programs that will benefit from a dual processor?
    How does one tell?

    Any understandable discussions on the net that anyone has seen?

    Thanks!
     
    HarryKrause, Jul 24, 2005
    #1
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  2. HarryKrause

    HarryKrause Guest



    I changed the header...I meant dual core processor, not dual processor.
    D'oh.
     
    HarryKrause, Jul 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. HarryKrause

    Leythos Guest

    First, you need to understand that all systems with current motherboards
    and OS's benefit from a Dual CPU setup, it's just how much that is
    always in question. In most cases, based on a typical Home user or small
    office user that only does MS Office type things, there will be limited
    (read that as almost insignificant) benefit to having more than one CPU
    - Even Hyper Threading CPU's add little benefit to most of those
    specific types of users.

    Now, for things that are multi-threaded, things that make extensive use
    of threads and are written properly, you can see significant benefit
    from having HT or Dual CPU's.

    Photoshop, the latest full versions, not the one that ships with your
    DVD player, seems to make good use of Dual CPU's, but I don't see MS
    Word doing much or even Excel in most instances. I'm not saying they
    don't benefit more than say Wordpad, but I've not see where anyone uses
    either of them enough that they would benefit from the Extra $500 to get
    a cheap Dual system over a single with Hyper-Threading.
     
    Leythos, Jul 24, 2005
    #3
  4. HarryKrause

    Tom Scales Guest

    Processor intensive tasks. Word is not. Photoshop is. Sometimes.
    Rendering video seriously is. Burning DVD/CD is, fairly.

    I'd like a dual core as I am a very heavy Photoshop user and also
    significant video work.

    For the average user, I doubt they'll see much.

    Tom
     
    Tom Scales, Jul 24, 2005
    #4
  5. HarryKrause

    HarryKrause Guest

    So, what if you are working on a long word doc that includes photos and
    at the same time you want to burn a CD. Is the dual core going to help?
    A little? A lot? Not at all?
     
    HarryKrause, Jul 24, 2005
    #5
  6. So, what if you are working on a long word doc that includes photos and at
    No, I don't think so. A long Word doc with photos and such will take up
    memory, but don't confuse that with how much your CPU is being utilized.
    One way to check is to open up a Windows Task Manager window. There's a
    window that shows CPU usage. I think a lot of people believe that having
    "lots of windows open" will utilize a dual core setup. It won't. I
    currently have 6 windows open, and my CPU usage is 0%. Word hardly ever
    uses the CPU, and if so, only for a few seconds. What we're talking about
    here is burning a CD, WHILE playing a CPU intesive game. Or rendering stuff
    in Photoshop that takes a minute or so. If you don't do these things, the
    benefits of a dual core will NOT be noticed. This applies to most users, in
    most scenarios.

    I assume this is a follow up of a previous thread where we both
    participated. That's why I recommended that the OP in that thread buy a
    higher clock single core CPU with the same money.
     
    Charles C. Shyu, Jul 24, 2005
    #6
  7. Your bottleneck here is RAM much more than CPU. If instead of opening a
    word document, say you were transcoding a video or compiling a program,
    then you'd see the benefit.
     
    Nicholas Andrade, Jul 24, 2005
    #7
  8. HarryKrause

    HarryKrause Guest


    Thanks, I really appreciate your response, especially since I can
    understand it!
     
    HarryKrause, Jul 24, 2005
    #8
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