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DVD burner with laptop or external

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by Scott, May 29, 2004.

  1. Scott

    Scott Guest

    I can get a DVD burner from Dell for $200 extra dollars or I can stay
    with the base CDRW/DVD drive. I think I want to get a DVD burner
    though and saw in price watch I can get an external for about $125.
    Should I go the external route to save a few bucks? Is external
    better? What brand would you suggest? Thanks
     
    Scott, May 29, 2004
    #1
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  2. If you are truly "mobile" with the laptop, the convenience factor makes
    the decision.

    However, $200 for an UPGRADE to the DVD burner seems high. You can
    probably buy a bare drive for no more than that (possibly a lot less)
    and still have (or sell) the DVD/CDRW combo drive.
     
    Barry Watzman, May 29, 2004
    #2
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  3. Scott

    Jason Guest

    I can get a DVD burner from Dell for $200 extra dollars or I can stay
    Well, I would say that it all depends on how much DVD creation you plan on
    doing -- and what formats you want to be able to support.

    When I got my last laptop (little under a year ago now), it only came with a
    CDRW/DVD player. I didn't plan on doing anything with DVD-RW at the time,
    but only a couple weeks after having the laptop got into digitizing old VHS
    stuff that I filmed years ago. So, began to look at burners.

    I knew I wanted a burner that would prove to be solid, stable, and capable
    of handing all the DVD formats. (DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW, DVD+RW). So,
    started lurking on different video newsgroups, reading web sites, etc.
    Finally decided on a Pioneer DVR-AO6U, which is an internal 5 1/4 slot
    drive. To be able to use it with a laptop, I bought a converter kit that
    allows 5 1/4 type drives to be ran externally. (Basically, its just a small
    box, with an internal power supply, and has a firewire/USB controller that
    integrates with the hardware you want to convert.)

    A little bit costly when I got it year ago, but didn't have much options for
    DVD-R/W's that worked with all formats. I couldn't be happier with it
    though. I've done literally hundreds of burns now as after I transfered
    home VHS stuff for myself other family members wanted me to make them a
    copy. Eventually, had friends/family asking me to transfer their VHS stuff
    to DVD.

    Great toy. Making DVD menus is fun too. Also great for doing hard drive
    backups.

    I'm not recommending the Pioneer DVR-AO6U specifically, surely you can
    probably find a faster drive now for much cheaper. (IIRC, I paid like $350
    for the drive alone. Its probably like $100 now. LOL. Don't you just love
    how hardware depreciates in value overnight?) :^)

    If you can live with the specs for the Pioneer DVR-AO6U now, and see it
    cheap somewhere, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it though. It has proved
    to be rock solid. (At the time, it was "the" drive, recommended by video
    sites, if you were doing quite a bit of home DVD video creation.) Probably
    is a successor to it by now, I'm sure.

    Also, I don't use the DVD-RW for playing CD's, DVD's, burning CD's, etc. I
    only use it for DVD creation. Hopefully that will give it a long lifespan.

    Anyway, sorry I couldn't give an exact answer -- but I would definetly
    recommend considering what type of use you plan on having mainly with it and
    doing some reading (newsgroups, video web sites, etc) before deciding on a
    drive.
     
    Jason, May 30, 2004
    #3
  4. Scott

    Paul Faze Guest

    Paul Faze, Aug 26, 2008
    #4
  5. Scott

    Roy Guest

    A DVD+/-RW or RAM is much better hardware than the CDRW/DVD drive
    combo....There is always a time that you will burn DVD that the latter
    cannot provide.
    I am not a regular DVD burner but when ever I select a laptop I have
    to ensure that it has at least a DVD+/-RW in it.
    Roy
     
    Roy, Aug 28, 2008
    #5
  6. Scott

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    There is no evidence that Panasonic (Matsushita) drives last any longer than
    any other brand. Whichever one you pick, optical drives have far too short
    a life before one of the lasers fail.

    The shortest life I have so far encountered is 5 months from a SONY drive.
    The longest life I have encountered is 19 months from an LG drive.
     
    M.I.5¾, Aug 28, 2008
    #6
  7. Scott

    Roy Guest

    I don't think that Sony Vaio Laptops is fitted with their own Sony
    drive?

    One of my Vaio notebooks have its DVD+/-RW drive stop functioning
    after 15 months...
     
    Roy, Aug 28, 2008
    #7
  8. Scott

    BillW50 Guest

    In M.I.5¾ typed on Thu, 28 Aug 2008 08:32:03 +0100:
    Wow I am very surprised! I think I only had one drive out of dozens that
    ever failed. And I still have drives from the 80's that are still working
    fine. Although I don't use CD/DVD drives very much. Thus why I don't care if
    I have one of my laptops or not. I pretty much use them just to install
    software and that is about all. Maybe that is why mine last so long. And the
    one that failed worked for about 15 hours and died. Too bad the warrantee
    had already expired.
     
    BillW50, Aug 28, 2008
    #8
  9. Scott

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    If it's a drive from the 80's it would be a CD-ROM drive (not a writer).
    The lasers in these work at a much lower power and thus have a longer life.
    Did CD-ROM drives exist in the 1980's?
     
    M.I.5¾, Aug 29, 2008
    #9
  10. Scott

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    I suspect that the actual longevity depends on where they source the laser
    diodes from. I understand that they rate at which they endure crystaline
    fracturing (the principal failure modus operandi) varies considerably from
    batch to batch (and even between individual examples within the batch). I
    have heard (but can't confirm) that less than 5% of the diodes that are made
    even work at all, but it wouldn't surprise me if it were true, because the
    yield of integrated circuits isn't very much higher. If the diode works, it
    probably gets shipped, because crystaline fracturing can't easily be
    predicted from a new diode. Japanese manufacturers are likely to have dual
    sourcing because one tiny problem in one plant can easily reduce the yield
    to zero.

    I would expect laptop drive diodes to fail faster than desktop drives as the
    diode assembly is much smaller making it more difficult to dissipate the
    heat (which is the prime cause of crystaline fracturing). Laser diodes
    generate a lot of heat in the lasing cavity and laptop drives generate the
    same heat as desktop.
     
    M.I.5¾, Aug 29, 2008
    #10
  11. Scott

    BillW50 Guest

    In M.I.5¾ typed on Fri, 29 Aug 2008 08:21:36 +0100:
    Oh okay. And yes CD-ROM drives were around in the 80's and I had them first.
    Since I was working for Philips as an engineer where it was invented. And we
    had them before they were commercially available. And the first CD-ROMs were
    made out of glass, although I don't think they were available outside of
    Philips. They were quite heavy and broke in a million pieces if you dropped
    them. I wish I saved some of them. As they might be actually worth something
    today. LOL

    --
    Bill
    Gateway Celeron M 370 (1.5GHZ)
    MX6124 (laptop) w/2GB
    Windows XP Home SP2 (120GB HD)
    Intel(r) 910GML (64MB shared)
     
    BillW50, Aug 29, 2008
    #11
  12. Scott

    me/2 Guest

    On Fri, 29 Aug 2008 08:21:36 +0100, "M.I.5¾"

    :>
    :>:>> In :>> M.I.5¾ typed on Thu, 28 Aug 2008 08:32:03 +0100:
    :>>> There is no evidence that Panasonic (Matsushita) drives last any
    :>>> longer than any other brand. Whichever one you pick, optical drives
    :>>> have far too short a life before one of the lasers fail.
    :>>>
    :>>> The shortest life I have so far encountered is 5 months from a SONY
    :>>> drive. The longest life I have encountered is 19 months from an LG
    :>>> drive.
    :>>
    :>> Wow I am very surprised! I think I only had one drive out of dozens that
    :>> ever failed. And I still have drives from the 80's that are still working
    :>> fine. Although I don't use CD/DVD drives very much. Thus why I don't care
    :>> if I have one of my laptops or not. I pretty much use them just to install
    :>> software and that is about all. Maybe that is why mine last so long. And
    :>> the one that failed worked for about 15 hours and died. Too bad the
    :>> warrantee had already expired.
    :>>
    :>
    :>If it's a drive from the 80's it would be a CD-ROM drive (not a writer).
    :>The lasers in these work at a much lower power and thus have a longer life.
    :>Did CD-ROM drives exist in the 1980's?
    :>

    I was working at Egghead software in the early 90's when the first
    CDROM games came out. Computer CDROM drives may have possibly first
    shown up in the very late 80's.

    As for longevity I've got a 5 year old Liteon DVDROM (read only) drive
    in my gaming system that still works great. It is normally only used
    for installing games since I never buy anything that a NoCD or NoDVD
    patch doesn't already exist. Even so that drive has seen a lot of use
    over the years.

    As for burners I've got a 4-5 year old NEC DVDRW drive in my work
    system that has burned well over a thousand DVDs (+, - and DL) and CDs
    over the years. It's still going strong even though it's the only
    optical drive in that system so it also gets used as a reader for
    installing software and watching DVD movies.

    Now the 1x DVD burner in my 5 year old Toshiba 5205 notebook is
    starting to show its age. It still burns okay (slow as ever) but it
    does have a problem reading some DVDs, burned or pressed.

    The difference in life expectancy for optical drives in notebooks and
    optical drives in full size computers most likely has to do with the
    fact there is normally much better ventilation and cooling in full
    size computers. On my Toshiba notebook a freshly burned disc is almost
    too hot to handle when first ejected right after the burn finishes.
    Also the palm rest right over the drive gets hot when just reading a
    disc. Interestingly enough the palm rest over the 80GB 7200RPM hard
    drive right next to the DVD drive hardly ever gets warm.

    me/2
     
    me/2, Aug 30, 2008
    #12
  13. Scott

    BillW50 Guest

    In me/2 typed on Fri, 29 Aug 2008 19:51:11 -0700:
    That is amazing! Why do my CD/DVD drives rarely ever burn out while others
    blow like light bulbs? Maybe you hit on something when you mentioned heat.
    As I always buy computers with cheap CPUs. Nowadays that means Celeron CPU.
    They run so much cooler than other types and my CPU use rarely goes over 5%
    on this machine for example. So I always figure why buy more CPU power when
    I don't even use the power I got now?

    --
    Bill
    Gateway Celeron M 370 (1.5GHZ)
    MX6124 (laptop) w/2GB
    Windows XP Home SP2 (120GB HD)
    Intel(r) 910GML (64MB shared)
     
    BillW50, Aug 30, 2008
    #13
  14. Scott

    BillW50 Guest

    In Barry Watzman typed on Sat, 30 Aug 2008 17:04:29 -0400:
    In me/2 typed:
    "In June 1985, the CD-ROM (read-only memory) and, in 1990, CD-Recordable
    were introduced."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_Disc

    --
    Bill
    Gateway Celeron M 370 (1.5GHZ)
    MX6124 (laptop) w/2GB
    Windows XP Home SP2 (120GB HD)
    Intel(r) 910GML (64MB shared)
     
    BillW50, Aug 30, 2008
    #14
  15. Scott

    BillW50 Guest

    In Barry Watzman typed on Sat, 30 Aug 2008 18:18:52 -0400:
    This Celeron normally runs about 134°F most of the time. The CPU percentage
    is usually 5% or less. Although when I do something very intensive like
    converting movies into another format, the CPU is maxed and the temperature
    hits 177°F. Although that is a rare event that I am doing such work.

    The EEE PC 701/702 also uses Celerons. The highest I have ever seen it was
    at 134°F. I do have an utility to change the speed from 900MHz to 810Mhz,
    720MHz, or 630MHz. Although frankly, I don't really notice too much between
    them or in the temperature. Although I should play more around with that.
    Also I should max out the CPU and then I should notice some differences.

    --
    Bill
    Gateway Celeron M 370 (1.5GHZ)
    MX6124 (laptop) w/2GB
    Windows XP Home SP2 (120GB HD)
    Intel(r) 910GML (64MB shared)
     
    BillW50, Aug 31, 2008
    #15
  16. Scott

    carterrk Guest

    What would you say about lifespan of laptop optical drives vs.
    external USB optical drives?

    Rick Carter
     
    carterrk, Sep 5, 2008
    #16
  17. Scott

    Roy Guest

    My experience with such... is they are roughly the same (but not in
    the statistical sense) as I have not used a lot of external and
    internal optical drives.
    That comparison was with the Slimtype drive ( not the normal desktop
    type DVD-/+RW drive)and the Internal Laptop optical drive.

    Roy
     
    Roy, Sep 5, 2008
    #17
  18. Scott

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    Wikipedia is not an acceptable authority - on anything.
     
    M.I.5¾, Sep 10, 2008
    #18
  19. Scott

    BillW50 Guest

    In M.I.5¾ typed on Wed, 10 Sep 2008 09:23:28 +0100:
    I agree that Wikipedia can be wrong sometimes, but that doesn't mean
    they are always wrong. By the same token, science is also sometimes
    wrong, but that doesn't mean they are always wrong. Although if you have
    information that disputes this information, I would *love* to hear it.

    Also remember I was working at Philips back then and we inverted the CD.
    So I was using CDs before the rest of you were. And I don't disagree
    with Wikipedia here at all. But feel free to add some solid evidence to
    the contrary.
     
    BillW50, Sep 10, 2008
    #19
  20. Scott

    M.I.5¾ Guest

    Philips didn't uniquely invent the CD. It was a co-operation with Sony.
     
    M.I.5¾, Sep 11, 2008
    #20
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