1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

E4300 and 650i overclocking

Discussion in 'Overclocking' started by Phil Weldon, Mar 24, 2007.

  1. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    How does overclocking with an E4300 and a 650i nVidia chipset motherboard
    strike you?

    Phil Weldon
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 24, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Phil Weldon

    Ed Medlin Guest

    I know that Asus with it's P5N series has some fanless cooling soulutions
    that I have read about but never actually have seen in action. Most of the
    folks who go with the nVidia do so for support of SLI, nVidia's version of
    the ATI Crossfire. I see much more about it on the gaming sites than the
    more basic productivity sites.........But that ain't all bad if you know
    what I mean....... Today's games require massive horsepower, both from the
    CPU and GPU. Personally, I have no experience with nVidia chipsets on the
    Intel platform, but did have one on an AMD a few years ago and had no issues
    whatsoever. I wouldn't hesitate going that route myself if I wanted support
    for SLI, but would probably go the tried and true I965/975 route since I
    have no plans on spending $800-$1000 for a couple of SLI video
    cards.......:).


    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Mar 24, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Phil Weldon

    Amir Facade Guest

    Actually, you can spend $220 on a pair of cards to run in SLI and get the
    frame rates of a single $400 - $500 card.

    Amir

    PS: ATI's Crossfire is a version of nVidia's SLI.
    LOL
     
    Amir Facade, Mar 24, 2007
    #3
  4. Phil Weldon

    Ed Medlin Guest

    yea....:) Actually their origins are from 3DFX's SLI. Chicken/Egg
    thing..........:)

    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Mar 25, 2007
    #4
  5. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    _____

    I have little interest in SLI graphics operation. I've always stuck with
    Intel chipset; once you begin to learn one manufacturer's products, you have
    a big investment in time to casually change. Intel chipset performance has
    always raised the barrier too high for me to seriously consider changing ...
    until now. I'd like to try nVidia chipsets. From what I've read, the
    parameters that can be changed for overclocking are extensive - more than
    the number available for Intel solutions. Also the idea of SLI memory
    (whatever that actually is) is intriguing.

    So at the moment I am leaning toward
    Intel E4300 Core 2 Duo 800 MHz FSB 1.8 GHz $168.99 US
    ASUS P5N-E SLI nForce 650i Socket 775 $135.00
    US

    OCZ OCZ2N1066R2GK 2 GB kit SLI DDR2 PC2-8500 $239.00 US
    EVGA 320-P2-N811-AR e-GeForce 8800 GTS 320MB $289.99 US.

    An alternative would be to replace the first two items with
    Intel E6600 Core 2 Duo 1066 MHz FSB 2.4 GHz $311.80 US
    Abit IN9 32X-MAX Wi-Fi 680i Socket 775 $329.99
    US.

    It seems to me that the E4300 with an 800 MHz FSB could be easier to
    overclock into the high 3 GHz range than the E6600, enough higher to make up
    for the smaller L2 cache. Additionally, with less than $170 US invested in
    the CPU, changing out to a new Intel offering later would be less traumatic.

    I have two water cooling systems (one with a 12" X 12" radiator) and several
    Peltier plates that I intend to use.

    I'd welcome any suggestions,

    Phil Weldon
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 26, 2007
    #5
  6. Phil Weldon

    Ed Medlin Guest

    I have little interest in SLI graphics operation. I've always stuck with
    The obvious route, IMO, would be the E4300, but the B2 (4meg cache
    rather than 2) stepping kind of raises my attention as to whether that would
    be the best route. It kind of reminds me of the P3/Celeron days when the
    larger cache outperformed the smaller cache at the same speeds in most
    instances. With your cooling, I just might lean more towards the E6600 just
    for the raw HP you may be able to get. The E4300 is obviously the best bang
    for the buck. I am not so sure you could get much more than mid-3ghz before
    the E4300 starts giving up the ghost even with great cooling unless you get
    lucky with a really good overclocker. As always, this can vary from chip to
    chip. I just wonder about the Peltiers being more trouble than they help
    overall. I have used them (guess all the old farts have..:), but I would
    like to see what the results are with them vs. just water cooling. I still
    have a few left over from the P2/P3 days but didn't really think about using
    them anymore.

    I tend to lean towards Asus just because I have have had so few problems
    with their MBs. It has been a long time, probably since the Coppernines,
    that I have built a system with an Abit. I don't have any idea how many Asus
    based systems I have built over the years and have just not had any major
    issues with them. I am not dissing other manufacturers, I just go with what
    has worked for me.

    That is about all I can comment about............I probably raised more
    questions than answers....:) Good luck Phil.......Let me know which way you
    go. I have the upgrade fever myself and am still trying to decide which way
    to go myself.


    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Mar 26, 2007
    #6
  7. Phil Weldon

    Al Brumski Guest

    Phil,
    I'm running :
    E6600 @3.85ghz (bench) 3.42 24/7 (1520 FSB 9x)
    OCZ DDR2 PC2-8000 Titanium Alpha VX2 2x1gb 4-4-3-8 1T 1066 Mhz
    Asus P5N32-E SLI (680i)
    2x seagate 7200.10 320 g raid 0
    EVGA 8800GTX
    TT Symphony water.
    Silverstone Olympia 1KW PSU

    I switched from an Asus P5WDH Deluxe (Intel 975x) and I'm happy I did.

    The overclocking headroom on this board is awesome, the only problem
    I've found is that the 680i northbridge runs hot. I MEAN HOT!!!

    At ~1.45v, you can't touch the heatsink and heat pipe..

    I would really recomend at least replacing the passive air heat pipe
    with active air B$ you install the board. Even if you only remove the
    nb and sb and replace the crap factory tape with AS5 you'll be far
    ahead of the temperature problem. I have a swiftech water block
    cooling the nb and it works very well.

    I am extremely happy with this board as I was with the P5WDH-Deluxe,
    but again this board clocks much easier. It's also 1333Mhz ready, I
    eventually would like to move to the new 45nm processors when they
    become available.

    I'll also say that I'm really happy with my overall system performance
    @3.42 ghz.
    Along with the 8800GTX, I can throw any game I want to at this system
    at max settings, and they run smooth as silk, even flight simulator
    2004 and fsx which are well known cpu hogs.

    The Asus board is not a reference board, but built from scratch. In
    fact if you peel the P5N32-E label from the board, you'll find the
    striker nameplate. It's a striker extreme without the fancy bells, for
    ~150.00 less ($249 at Tiger Direct).

    Which ever 680i board you choose, I think you'll be really happy.
    I frequent 3 overclocking forums--

    Graphics benchmarks:
    http://www.overclock.net/benchmarki...l-top-30-computers-graphics-benchmarking.html

    I'm nuclearjock..

    P.S. Those benchies were obtained with my old P5WDH-Deluxe.

    All the best,

    Al
     
    Al Brumski, Mar 27, 2007
    #7
  8. Phil Weldon

    Billy Bob Guest

    Really?

    What pair would that be?


    bob


     
    Billy Bob, Mar 27, 2007
    #8
  9. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Al Brumski' wrote, in part:> I switched from an Asus P5WDH Deluxe (Intel
    975x) and I'm happy I did.
    _____

    Al,

    Thanks for the reply, especially the heat information.
    I am pretty sure I will start off with the E4300, but the price you quote
    for the ASUS 680i motherboard is attractive. The cheaper 650i ASUS
    motherboard fits my plan to use several large parallel ATA hard drives as it
    has two IDE parallel ATA channels. One problem I am having with ASUS is
    that it seems to be impossible to download any manuals from the ASUS sites.
    I like top download the manual before making a purchase, and it just doesn't
    seem possible with ASUS; I've been trying every day for a week now.

    Phil Weldon
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 27, 2007
    #9
  10. Phil Weldon

    Ed Medlin Guest

    I would like to know what those cards are too......:), especially if they
    are going to give the performance of top-of-the-line PCI-E cards.

    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Mar 27, 2007
    #10
  11. Phil Weldon

    Amir Facade Guest

    Amir Facade, Mar 28, 2007
    #11
  12. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    Thanks for the input all.

    I laid my money down, and did pretty well price-wise ($1000 US for the five
    core components).
    Now on to assembly and OS (XP) installation. Then comes
    * will a 500 Watt ATX12V 2.03 power supply do the trick
    * what cooling method (starting with Intel stock and lots of case
    ventilation in a server case.

    Final decision
    CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo E4300 1.8 GHz 800 MHz FSB $168 US
    Motherboard: EVGA 122-CK-NF63-TR nForce 680i $199 US
    Display Adapter: EVGA 32-P2-N811-AR E-GeForce 8800 GTS 320 MByte DDR3 $289
    US
    Memory: Patriot eXtreme 2 X 1 GByte DDR2-1066 (PC8500) $200 US
    Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 500 GByte Serial ATA 7200RPM w/16
    MByte buffer $144 US
    (ZipFlyZoom except for newEgg for the memory

    Any predictions on overclocking limit?

    Phil Weldon

    | How does overclocking with an E4300 and a 650i nVidia chipset motherboard
    | strike you?
    |
    | Phil Weldon
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 30, 2007
    #12
  13. Phil Weldon

    Thomas Guest

    Phil,

    I'm also looking for a new rig, similar to your lay-out.

    First thing is, I'm wondering why you went 'all-out' with the memory? I was
    thinking about getting some 800 MHz CL4 memory (cheaper), since overclocking
    the CPU by 100% would still leave me with an FSB of 400 MHz, which
    translates to 800MHz memory speed. Or are you simply investing in future
    upgradability?

    My prediction? Well, on air, I think about 3.4 GHz? Mainly depends on
    whether you're lucky with yr sample, I guess.

    Let us know how you fare!
     
    Thomas, Mar 30, 2007
    #13
  14. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Thomas' wrote, in part:
    _____

    I want to thoroughly explore overclocking the Intel Core 2 Duo.
    What I finally decided on was to put together a system with the fewest
    possible limitations on overclocking.
    That's why I went with fast memory and the nVidia 680i motherboard.
    I picked the E4300 for two reasons; it's the cheapest Core 2 Duo, and it
    starts off with a lower FSB.

    After I thoroughly wring out the E4300 then the E6000 series will be
    cheaper, then after that there's 45 nanometers, and 32, and 22, and ...
    I have a water cooling system with a 12" X 12" radiator, a few Peltier
    arrays, and a Lamda 11 - 15 VDC 50 amp adjustable power supply.
    I have temperature readout system with 8 sensors and a serial port and a
    parts box going back to the Celeron 300a.
    With this system it's the journey that's important to me. I am not a big
    gamer, and so far I don't edit video (too much like work for no pay B^)
    The only reason I went for an nVidia 8800 card is to keep an eye on DX10
    (hoping that Microsoft will eventually provide DX10 without Vista, or at
    least wit a more mature Vista.

    So you see I'm more interested in what I can do TO this system than in what
    the system can DO.

    If I really need performance, I'd still think hard about the same high speed
    memory, inexpensive CPU.
    Right now the price differential between 2 X 1 GByte DDR2-1066 (PC8500) and
    2 X 1 GByte DDR2-800 (PC6400) is only $40 US (ZipZoomFly.com).
    The price differential between the E4300 and the E6600 is $150 US ( I see no
    reason to go for an E6000 series CPU with a 2 MByte L2 cache.

    Also, if Intel brings forth a 1333 MHz FSB, then PC8500 memory will still be
    useful with only a moderate CPU:Memory clock ratio change.

    I could be wrong. I first began programming computers in 1965; I tend to
    take the long view.

    Hope this helps. Thanks for your comments and questions. Please post an
    update on what you build and your results.

    Phil Weldon
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 30, 2007
    #14
  15. Phil Weldon

    Thomas Guest

    Phil Weldon wrote: (also in part)
    I understand more about what you're trying to do... With exploring the
    limits, you dont want to be limited by something like yr memory.

    I've been overclocking, too, this started on my P75 :) I went with a
    watercooling setup with my P4C 2.6, but this time I'll see how the current
    air cooling solutions pay out first. I'll be keeping that setup running, my
    girlfriend was surprised how fast photoshop runs on it :) Good excuse for
    me to pass that system to her and make a completely new build.

    I'm now mainly interested in building a 'budget' rig, and trying to get the
    most out of all my components. In the past, i tried to make my pc's future
    proof, but that never really paid out :) I kept upgrading half my PC
    because the upgradability was less good than advertised.

    I'm mainly doubting about my mainboard. I'm planning on getting an Ati
    x1950XT vid card, and it'd be good to have at least the possibility of
    adding an extra card with crossfire. Currently, I'm leaning towards the Asus
    P5W DH Deluxe.

    Anyway, when (if...) I finish the build, I'll report back!
     
    Thomas, Mar 30, 2007
    #15
  16. Phil Weldon

    Ed Medlin Guest

    Seems you are set. Yea, I think a good, brand name 500w should do you
    well. I just read this morning that Intel is releasing a 45nm 8 core chip in
    (at least they say) early 2008. Each of the 8 cores will be hyperthreaded. I
    just read the damn article and forget the code name of the thing.
    With your cooling and tenacity, I would guess you will probably get the
    4300 processor to a 100% OC.........:). Somewhere between 3.4 and 3.6 would
    be very good. Keep us informed on your progress, I am really interested.
    Whichever I decide on, I will probably go with just water cooling sans the
    Peltier. Good luck pal.

    Ed
     
    Ed Medlin, Mar 30, 2007
    #16
  17. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Ed Medlin' wrote, in part:
    | Seems you are set. Yea, I think a good, brand name 500w should do you
    | well. I just read this morning that Intel is releasing a 45nm 8 core chip
    in
    | (at least they say) early 2008. Each of the 8 cores will be hyperthreaded.
    I
    | just read the damn article and forget the code name of the thing.
    _____

    'Nehalem'
    http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/31408/135/

    I really wanted to consider an ASUS motherboard, but found it impossible to
    get a manual successfully downloaded from the ASUS website!

    By the way, I'm going to try out diamond dust in an oil soluble base for a
    thermal compound; it's cheaper than 'Arctic Silver'!
    Five grams of 0-2 micron diamond particles for $7.34 US. Actually larger
    particles would likely be better; that's a bit more expensive; ~ $20 US for
    five grams.
    McMaster-Carr at http://www.mcmaster.com

    Everything but the memory will be delivered today except possibly for the
    memory. ZipZoomFly was backordered for PC8500 and newEgg is slower.
    I'll probably go to CompUSA today to look for a power supply. There should
    be some attractive bargains; CompUSA is closing all of its stores in the
    Atlanta area.

    Phil Weldon

    |
    | | > 'Thomas' wrote, in part:
    | >> I'm also looking for a new rig, similar to your lay-out.
    | >>
    | >> First thing is, I'm wondering why you went 'all-out' with the memory? I
    | >> was thinking about getting some 800 MHz CL4 memory (cheaper), since
    | >> overclocking the CPU by 100% would still leave me with an FSB of 400
    MHz,
    | >> which translates to 800MHz memory speed. Or are you simply investing in
    | >> future upgradability?
    | > _____
    | >
    | > I want to thoroughly explore overclocking the Intel Core 2 Duo.
    | > What I finally decided on was to put together a system with the fewest
    | > possible limitations on overclocking.
    | > That's why I went with fast memory and the nVidia 680i motherboard.
    | > I picked the E4300 for two reasons; it's the cheapest Core 2 Duo, and it
    | > starts off with a lower FSB.
    | >
    | > After I thoroughly wring out the E4300 then the E6000 series will be
    | > cheaper, then after that there's 45 nanometers, and 32, and 22, and ...
    | > I have a water cooling system with a 12" X 12" radiator, a few Peltier
    | > arrays, and a Lamda 11 - 15 VDC 50 amp adjustable power supply.
    | > I have temperature readout system with 8 sensors and a serial port and a
    | > parts box going back to the Celeron 300a.
    | > With this system it's the journey that's important to me. I am not a
    big
    | > gamer, and so far I don't edit video (too much like work for no pay B^)
    | > The only reason I went for an nVidia 8800 card is to keep an eye on DX10
    | > (hoping that Microsoft will eventually provide DX10 without Vista, or at
    | > least wit a more mature Vista.
    | >
    | > So you see I'm more interested in what I can do TO this system than in
    | > what the system can DO.
    | >
    | > If I really need performance, I'd still think hard about the same high
    | > speed memory, inexpensive CPU.
    | > Right now the price differential between 2 X 1 GByte DDR2-1066 (PC8500)
    | > and 2 X 1 GByte DDR2-800 (PC6400) is only $40 US (ZipZoomFly.com).
    | > The price differential between the E4300 and the E6600 is $150 US ( I
    see
    | > no reason to go for an E6000 series CPU with a 2 MByte L2 cache.
    | >
    | > Also, if Intel brings forth a 1333 MHz FSB, then PC8500 memory will
    still
    | > be useful with only a moderate CPU:Memory clock ratio change.
    | >
    | > I could be wrong. I first began programming computers in 1965; I tend
    to
    | > take the long view.
    | >
    | > Hope this helps. Thanks for your comments and questions. Please post
    an
    | > update on what you build and your results.
    | >
    | > Phil Weldon
    | >
    | >
    |
    | Seems you are set. Yea, I think a good, brand name 500w should do you
    | well. I just read this morning that Intel is releasing a 45nm 8 core chip
    in
    | (at least they say) early 2008. Each of the 8 cores will be hyperthreaded.
    I
    | just read the damn article and forget the code name of the thing.
    | With your cooling and tenacity, I would guess you will probably get the
    | 4300 processor to a 100% OC.........:). Somewhere between 3.4 and 3.6
    would
    | be very good. Keep us informed on your progress, I am really interested.
    | Whichever I decide on, I will probably go with just water cooling sans the
    | Peltier. Good luck pal.
    |
    | Ed
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 30, 2007
    #17
  18. Phil Weldon

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Thomas' wrote, in part:
    | I understand more about what you're trying to do... With exploring the
    | limits, you dont want to be limited by something like yr memory.
    |
    | I've been overclocking, too, this started on my P75 :) I went with a
    | watercooling setup with my P4C 2.6, but this time I'll see how the current
    | air cooling solutions pay out first. I'll be keeping that setup running,
    my
    | girlfriend was surprised how fast photoshop runs on it :) Good excuse for
    | me to pass that system to her and make a completely new build.
    _____

    Yeah, I'm passing my overclocked Pentium 2.6 GHz overclocked to 3.2 GHz to
    my brother. Also he has built himself a machine shop, so we may make some
    water blocks.

    Phil Weldon

    | Phil Weldon wrote: (also in part)
    | > I want to thoroughly explore overclocking the Intel Core 2 Duo.
    | > What I finally decided on was to put together a system with the fewest
    | > possible limitations on overclocking.
    | > That's why I went with fast memory and the nVidia 680i motherboard.
    | > I picked the E4300 for two reasons; it's the cheapest Core 2 Duo, and
    | > it starts off with a lower FSB.
    | >
    | > After I thoroughly wring out the E4300 then the E6000 series will be
    | > cheaper, then after that there's 45 nanometers, and 32, and 22, and
    | > ... I have a water cooling system with a 12" X 12" radiator, a few
    Peltier
    | > arrays, and a Lamda 11 - 15 VDC 50 amp adjustable power supply.
    | > I have temperature readout system with 8 sensors and a serial port
    | > and a parts box going back to the Celeron 300a.
    | > With this system it's the journey that's important to me. I am not a
    | > big gamer, and so far I don't edit video (too much like work for no
    | > pay B^) The only reason I went for an nVidia 8800 card is to keep an eye
    | > on
    | > DX10 (hoping that Microsoft will eventually provide DX10 without
    | > Vista, or at least wit a more mature Vista.
    | >
    | > So you see I'm more interested in what I can do TO this system than
    | > in what the system can DO.
    | >
    | > If I really need performance, I'd still think hard about the same
    | > high speed memory, inexpensive CPU.
    | > Right now the price differential between 2 X 1 GByte DDR2-1066
    | > (PC8500) and 2 X 1 GByte DDR2-800 (PC6400) is only $40 US
    | > (ZipZoomFly.com). The price differential between the E4300 and the E6600
    | > is $150 US ( I
    | > see no reason to go for an E6000 series CPU with a 2 MByte L2 cache.
    | >
    | > Also, if Intel brings forth a 1333 MHz FSB, then PC8500 memory will
    | > still be useful with only a moderate CPU:Memory clock ratio change.
    | >
    | > I could be wrong. I first began programming computers in 1965; I
    | > tend to take the long view.
    | >
    | > Hope this helps. Thanks for your comments and questions. Please
    | > post an update on what you build and your results.
    |
    | I understand more about what you're trying to do... With exploring the
    | limits, you dont want to be limited by something like yr memory.
    |
    | I've been overclocking, too, this started on my P75 :) I went with a
    | watercooling setup with my P4C 2.6, but this time I'll see how the current
    | air cooling solutions pay out first. I'll be keeping that setup running,
    my
    | girlfriend was surprised how fast photoshop runs on it :) Good excuse for
    | me to pass that system to her and make a completely new build.
    |
    | I'm now mainly interested in building a 'budget' rig, and trying to get
    the
    | most out of all my components. In the past, i tried to make my pc's future
    | proof, but that never really paid out :) I kept upgrading half my PC
    | because the upgradability was less good than advertised.
    |
    | I'm mainly doubting about my mainboard. I'm planning on getting an Ati
    | x1950XT vid card, and it'd be good to have at least the possibility of
    | adding an extra card with crossfire. Currently, I'm leaning towards the
    Asus
    | P5W DH Deluxe.
    |
    | Anyway, when (if...) I finish the build, I'll report back!
    |
    | --
    | Met vriendelijke groeten, Thomas vd Horst.
    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Mar 30, 2007
    #18
  19. Phil Weldon

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Phil Weldon wrote:


    [snip]
    S'cuse my ignorance Phil but why the diamond lapping paste as a TIM? It
    seems a rather strange thing to use to me. Does it have properties that I'm
    not aware of? Are you sure that the paste won't thin out and run away at
    temperature leaving a few "rocks" and air gaps in it's place?

    Is it just for bragging rights? ("You've got silver? Loser. Mine is
    diamond." <g>)

    (BTW, I'm aware of your view on commercial TIMs).

    Cheers, and good luck with the system, I'll be following your progress with
    interest.
     
    ~misfit~, Mar 31, 2007
    #19
  20. Phil Weldon

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Ahh, OK. having done some research I now know that diamonds are *very*
    thermally conductive. I only hope that your paste has a high percentage of
    diamonds to carrier. Maybe you could heat it and hope that the diamonds
    settle? Probably not at that size.

    Anyway, good luck. :)
     
    ~misfit~, Mar 31, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.